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  • David_J_Buchholz
    replied
    Oddly it didn't start as being that complex in my head. But it's a snowball turning into an avalanche.

    Thank you all for the comments. I do appreciate the time any of you take to reply. Particular thanks to those who've followed along from the beginning.

    I have the basic idea for the cradle figured out roughly. It actually slides up and down with the main vertical I-beams. Like the real thing. Just gotta implement it a little better so it integrates as a whole. The top of the leg is sitting a little too far back into the structure. Will need to move it's axle mount on the girders forward. Even an 1/8 inch would help.

    Might need to rework the discharge chute so it does not reach so far back into the tower as well.
    bUt that won't take long to fix. Slightly different radius of final angle will help that. Makes a big hole in the floors otherwise.

    Leave a comment:


  • acousticco
    replied
    I can't really imagine taking on a project this complex, I guess I'm more of a sticks on wheels kinda guy. It's really starting to take shape!

    -Cody

    Leave a comment:


  • CNE1899
    replied
    Bruce,

    Very nice modeling! Lots of details, loads of info. Thanks for all the explanations and photos! Makes for an interesting read.

    Scott

    Leave a comment:


  • Dutchman
    replied
    Wowser! Click image for larger version

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    That is some piece of equipment and a challenging modeling project.

    Leave a comment:


  • David_J_Buchholz
    replied
    The next piece of the puzzle that I'll be working with is what I am simply going to refer to as "the cradle" . There are very few photos that exist to my knowledge. I've gathered the only few that I could find.

    The cradle holds the Marine Leg, enabling three things.

    1) An electric motor is needed to drive the belt within the leg. It sits on a shelf at the top of the cradle. That powers the mechanism that lifts the grain from the hold of the ship, to the top of the leg. A motor using a chain link gear reduction drive turns the top sprocket within the leg.

    2) There is a pulley system above the cradle that lifts or lowers the cradle, and thus the provides the ability to lower the "digger" end into the hold of the ship being unloaded. It holds the entire leg in a position as judged by the operators skill.

    3) A second set of pulleys located above that, pulls upward on the center of the leg. Since the top of the leg at any point in time, is at a fixed vertical position in the cradle, the only movement possible for the leg, is for the bottom to move outward, and therefore defines the only direction possible for the leg to move. The bottom of the leg is forced to move outward across the hold of the ship.

    Think of it like your own leg. It swivels at the hip. If you keep your leg stiff, but lift on your knee, your foot moves outward. If this case, your "leg" weighs several tons, and needs help from the pulleys.

    Not yet accounted for in picture or modeling, is a winch and pulley system that drags the tower along the length of the ship to get from hold to hold. Before the traveling tower was invented, the unloading process required that the boat had to be moved instead.

    Here's a few pictures to give you an idea of the scope of the cradle's mechanism. Pics of the implementation of the model will follow in a few days as it develops.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	Cradle_1opt.jpg Views:	0 Size:	123.7 KB ID:	983167 Click image for larger version  Name:	Cradle_2opt.jpg Views:	0 Size:	201.1 KB ID:	983168 Click image for larger version  Name:	Cradle_4opt.jpg Views:	0 Size:	94.8 KB ID:	983169
    Last edited by David_J_Buchholz; 01-30-2022, 08:59 AM.

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  • Bernd
    replied
    That's quite a bit of engineering there Dave. Like those prototype shots. Now if you could only animate all that action. <BSG>

    Bernd

    Leave a comment:


  • David_J_Buchholz
    replied
    Thank you all for your comments. Although I may not acknowledge each of you individually, I do appreciate your taking time out to add your comments. Many of you have helped change the direction of, add to, or better center the ongoing projects on the North Coast Railroad. Thank you all for your input. Always feel free to add more. I am happy to hear many of you appreciate the history of the prototypes or the real world they existed within that I have laid out. It was a different world back then, a much different world.

    SO much for the sentimentality. Lets get to work before I have to puke.

    The business end of the Marine Arm, the digger, is next on the list for modeling. I noticed in old photos, that the bucket were offset from side to side. Additionally, I found a photo of a shock absorber, an anti-vibration system within the tower. I would suspect the tower was prone to shaking due to the rhythmic action of the buckets doing their work. Similar to how I start shaking when I see a knife in my wife's hands.


    First off a few photos of the prototypes. This is the arm retracted into the tower. the vertical rollers were used to guide ropes seen in the next photo.
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    Secondly, the modeling of the digger end of the arm. It starts with simple side plates , with simulated bearings mounted for the axle. One thing I've learned is not make the part to exact size, I make it larger, then file it down to fit, after is in glued in place. I did the same thing with the vertical braces on the leg. Less waste of material.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_4413opt.jpg Views:	0 Size:	90.7 KB ID:	983034




    Next up is the forming of the bucket cover. Might have to remake it, as adding the crossbars seems to limit the ability to smoothly bend the cover around the endplates. I might try hitting it with a hair dryer, while while wrapping it around a dowel.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_4415opt.jpg Views:	0 Size:	118.4 KB ID:	983035



    Internally the buckets are attached to the belt. It is simple black paper that will be wrapped around a dowel. The buckets are likely to be made from some plastic barrels cut up to quarter circles, then glued to the belt. The side plates have been sanded down now.


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    Lastly the bucket cover in place. you can see why high detail of the buckets is un-needed, particularly when down in the hold of the grain freighter , as it will be very hard to see inside the digger head at that point. You can see it is wider than needed, but centered. Once it is glued, I'll trim it to proper width.


    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_4417opt.jpg Views:	0 Size:	90.0 KB ID:	983037



    That's it for tonight folks. Time for a beer/

    Fifth Dave to the right.
    Last edited by David_J_Buchholz; 01-28-2022, 02:44 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Larryc
    replied
    David if you hadn't told us you were "guesstimating" I don't think anyone would have been the wiser. Looks
    great and I'm sure is a one of a kind model.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernd
    commented on 's reply
    Any way you slice it, it looks great. Nothing seems to be out of proportion.

  • David_J_Buchholz
    replied
    Originally posted by Michael_Hohn View Post
    Wow, what an explosion of information and modeling, with some laser-sharp humor. There won't be any poking holes in your research.

    You might be weird, but you're no flake.

    Cheerio,
    Mike
    You spent a lot of time thinking of every one of those references to posts about grain explosions and Lazer engraved cereal right up to the last sign off of "Cheerio" I got a good chuckle out of it all. ( although the flake comment left me a little "frosted")

    Thank you for you friendship, particularly when it's from the distance of another state.

    Dave Buchholz
    Last edited by David_J_Buchholz; 01-27-2022, 11:56 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • David_J_Buchholz
    replied
    Bernd, selective compression would be the best explanation and still allow me to have some small shred of dignity left.

    Distance between floors of tower was due to the dimension of the spiral stairway available. That turned out to be 12 feet. I thought that was a reasonable guestimate to model, based on what few photos I could find of people within the tower.

    The architectural diagram from General Mills seen in a few earlier posts helps solidify general placement in the real world. But it was only a side view. The frontal diagram does not exist to my knowledge, but at least it confirmed distances between floors as reasonable.

    Campbell corrugated siding only came in certain sizes, so that also became a factor. ( Now I know there is a die press from Shapeways for up to fourteen scale feet available)

    Third was given the height of the Walthers Silo kit, knowing the tower had to be higher than the silos, I kept a reasonable angle from spout tip to the roof top, given putting the collectors in-between. Knowing that everything from the lift spout was gravity driven, the grains had to slide, so it could not be a shallow angle.

    My collection of photos helped considerably in those regards, some of which you helped to find with links. Nothing is truly prototype dimension, but I tried to keep it proportioned to the overall structure. Again the architectural diagram became most helpful.

    Even with all that said, for the most part, I'm just winging it, with many a " How in hell am I gonna make that!" along the way.

    For the buckets visible at the bottom of the leg. I can only think of cutting up some Grandt line barrels to create them. ANY IDEAS would be helpful in that regard. I don't have a Three D printer.


    Fifth Dave to the right.
    Last edited by David_J_Buchholz; 01-29-2022, 07:06 AM.

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  • Michael_Hohn
    replied
    Wow, what an explosion of information and modeling, with some laser-sharp humor. There won't be any poking holes in your research.

    You might be weird, but you're no flake.

    Cheerio,
    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernd
    replied
    Agree with Bruce. Very impressive.

    Question, how are you determining sizes of the individual components? Guesstimating?

    Bernd

    Leave a comment:


  • Dutchman
    replied
    This is becoming one impressive model, Dave.

    Leave a comment:


  • David_J_Buchholz
    replied
    I got some further progress on the Marine tower done on my day off today. So I'm posting some updates, of the models, and a few pics of the prototypes from where the inspiration comes from. When you stop to think of it, since the t0wer literally move on rails, the marine towers are VERY shortline railroads unto themselves. About a hundred yards long. Add to the fact that they are such weird looking things with a pronounced vertical element, and they just begged to be modeled by someone who's into vertical exaggeration. Guess who drew the short straw? ( Make you own joke folk, I just supply strsight lines)

    Ok with all that background material said, the fact I'm wierd, it was a perfect match.

    First up , a photo showing the relationship on the model between the lift head on the back of the tower, the collectors on top of the silos, and the internal conveyor and grain tripper within the head house..

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    Definitely gonna throw an LED inside the head house. The prototype tower was operated at night, around the clock until the ships were totally unloaded. It cost money to leave the ship tied up to the dock. So a few lights to help "night" photos in the future will be appropriate to include on the model. This next photo gives a better Idea of the prototype collectors, and the model seen further below .


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    Last is a photo of the prototype Marine Leg, and my selectively compressed version. It keeps the general idea of the leg intact.



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    That's it for tonight. Your comments and sheep jokes are always appreciated.

    FIfth "Dave " to the right.
    No, over one more, that was only four Dave's to the right.
    Last edited by David_J_Buchholz; 01-27-2022, 03:22 PM.

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