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  • So are you saying building the tower is off the modeling deep end? Or just if it falls over into the water?

    [:-jester]
    Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

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    • Here's a picture of something all you heavy weathering guys can drool over. A well rusted Marine Leg in Buffalo. The pulley system you see is what drags the tower along the rail from one end to the other so the it can reach all the holds of the ship being unloaded.




      Here's a little more of an overall view of the same structure.




      I have a photo that unfortunately, won't load up "error 13" It shows the mechanism as to how the Marine Leg is angled out away from the tower. As the support arm is lifted by cables, it presses out against the Marine Leg, thereby pushes the leg outward from the tower. It then acts as a fulcrum point as the leg is lowered against it.

      Keeping it mind that the ship starts low in the water and raises as it unloads. The leg needs to be controlled both vertically and horizontally. Between the two movements, the leg downward, and the support outward, it can sweep the width of the hold. The third direction is that it is pulled along the length of the ship from hold to hold via the external cable and pulley system that you are viewing above, So you have the marine leg system capable of moving the bottom of the bucket lift in all three directions to reach down into the hold, across the hold, then from hold to hold to repeat the process until the ship is empty,
      Last edited by David_J_Buchholz; 11-11-2021, 01:00 AM.
      Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

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      • Hi David

        Loving all the work you doing here. Keep at it.

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        • Just had a broken molar yanked out. So no going into work today. Been trolling the internet for pictures of the inside of Marine Leg towers. Hit what is the motherload (so far to date) at the Library of Congress website. WHOOHOO.

          Got photos showing two different ways of extending the leg via the arm underneath.

          One shows the arm fixed to the tower, using pullies lifting the support arm, there by pushing out the leg.

          The other shows a screw jacking system, whereby, the arm is fixed to the leg instead of the tower. In the tower there is a gear driven shaft at the top of the arm.As it is turned, the top of the arm goes down, and the fixed point on the leg has no where to go, but out, pushing the leg out in the process.

          It appears, that the screw jacking system was the later method, but I think the pullies and cables will make a more interesting model.

          On the modeling side, the Tichy casement Windows arrived. NICE! Beats the Walters stock windows all to hell. Got about half the openings enlarged already.
          Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

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          • Marine Leg (X) is angled out away from tower (C) the support arm (A) is lifted by cables (Y), presses out against Marine Leg (B), thereby pushes leg (B) outward from tower (C) acting as fulcrum point (D) as leg (B) is lowered against tower (C).

            Phew I think I go it. Thanks. 8D

            What did he say, I don't know I'm just going along with it. Shhh!
            Frank

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            • What he said. Exactly.

              Frank, the scary part is that there is a diagram that uses letters to describe the parts of the whole structure, and you might have actually hit a few correctly!

              Found a bunch of photo portfolios on the Library of Congress site. I won't post them,but those having interest can use the following links, about 100 or so pics altogether.

              https://www.loc.gov/resource/hhh.ny1667.photos?st=grid

              https://www.loc.gov/resource/hhh.ny1...tos?st=gallery

              https://www.loc.gov/resource/hhh.ny1...tos?st=gallery

              https://www.loc.gov/resource/hhh.ny1...tos?st=gallery
              Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

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              • Got the confirmation message today that my Langell Boys ship from Sylvan Scale Models has been shipped and is Enroute.
                Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

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                • Not too complicated inside there, but where's my dust mask.
                  Frank

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                  • I was out of town today in Syracuse for an Executive Board meeting of our union.

                    After ward I had a little tim, and there was a model railroad store not far away. Found abucket of detail parts, from old boilers, roof details, some Tichy windows, Walthers smoke stacks, and a few other goodies hidden in the car so my wife doesn't find them.
                    Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

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                    • As "final" as track plans ever get, Here's the final design which includes a reset of the yard and engine service facilities, to give both more room.

                      As always, your comments and critiques are welcome.


                      Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

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                      • The fleet is in. Well, actually it's in resin, but at least it arrived.

                        The Great Lakes freighter (Langell Boys) and fishing tug are both from Sylvan Scale Models. Artitec imports the 120 ton motorized barge.

                        You can see the progress of the scene with the Marine Leg Tower in the center, malting house behind that, and the semi-flat building to the right.



                        Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

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                        • David,

                          Given the space available, your layout offers a lot of operations potential. I like the concept and scenes you are developing.

                          I have enjoyed watching you build the marine leg and the information accompanying your work, and look forward to your boat construction.

                          Mike
                          _________________________________________________

                          Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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                          • David, the scene you’re developing is looking great. The marine leg is coming along nicely and the fleet is definitely in. What is a fishing tug? That’s a new one on me.
                            Frank

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                            • Thanks to all of you on the forum that have shown continued interest beyond my Van Gogh cloud painting era.

                              Frank, unique to the Great Lakes was the form of boat used for commercial fishing fleets. They are unlike the lobster and clam boats that we get accustomed to viewing, in that they are usually enclosed, and seemingly very few had masts like a traditional trawler.

                              Oddly they were not referred to as a fishing "boat". That seemed reserved for small non-commercial boats. Many shipyards produced tug boats for the Great Lakes. Many of those hulls were finished as or converted afterward for fishing. So I suspect the word "fishing" was added to the name, to differentiate the final purpose of the tug hull.

                              From Sylvan, the "tug"came with three different versions of the pilot house. One of them may very well get retrofitted to the Langell Boys, to the replace the open wheel house. Over the years, the Langell Boys had been refitted with a different, enclosed wheel house.

                              Here's a link for further info.

                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fish_tug
                              Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

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                              • If you're fishing in that kind of weather some protection would be necessary. Thanks.
                                Frank

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