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Distressing a MTL C-and-S coal car

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  • Distressing a MTL C-and-S coal car

    I distressed the first of my HOn3 Micro Trains Line C&S coal cars:
    • Tops of sides cut down with a hobby knife.
    • Insides and brakeman's footboard scratched with a stainless steel brush.
    • Insides and footboard painted off-white, and then stained with a mix of oak and ebony stain.
    • Iron straps and corner braces inside car re-painted boxcar red.
    • White lettering scratched with stainless brush.
    • White lettering smeared with pan pastel.








    Cheers,

    Jeff.

  • #2
    Coal and rain produce carbonic acid, which would cause the inside iron to rust.

    Overall a great job, consider adding some road dust along the bottom of the car.

    dave
    Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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    • #3
      > ... consider adding some road dust along the bottom of the car...

      Definitely. But I think I need to figure out the airbrush for that (it's been about 30 years since I last used one).

      The truck in the background needs it even more (as it's a darker colour).

      Comment


      • #4
        The car looks great, as does the layout it's sitting on. I'd love to see more!

        -Cody

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        • #5
          quote:


          Originally posted by jeyjey


          > ... consider adding some road dust along the bottom of the car...

          Definitely. But I think I need to figure out the airbrush for that (it's been about 30 years since I last used one).

          The truck in the background needs it even more (as it's a darker colour).


          Or try some Pan Pastels, they work well for this kind of application.
          dave
          Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:


            Originally posted by acousticco


            The car looks great, as does the layout it's sitting on. I'd love to see more!

            -Cody


            He he... you've just seen about 1/2 of what is done.

            The other 1/2 can be seen near the end of the Stub Switch thread (http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/t...TOPIC_ID=45882).

            Cheers,

            Jeff.

            Comment


            • #7
              I was holding off on Dave's suggesting of adding some road grime until I got the couplers swapped out for some Sergent Engineering Sharons.

              Sure enough, the handling of the car rubbed off most of the white pan pastels I had applied for the washed-out paint.

              So I pastelled it up again, added some road grime (using powder scraped from a Derwent pastel pencil), and sprayed it with matte varnish. The varnish also made most of the pastels disappear.

              I thought "no problem", I'll just put it on a bit heavier. The second application of matte varnish, however, didn't have nearly as big of an effect, leaving me with a slightly caricature weathering.

              My guess is that the first coat of varnish provided more tooth for the second application of pastels, but I'm not really sure. In any case, I'm happy enough to consider these "done" (apart from adding a full load to one, and a partial to the other).



              Cheers,

              Jeff.

              Comment


              • #8
                It looks very good and old. You are right about the matt Varnish it will add the 'tooth' you were referring to. Spraying with dulcoat will do the same

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                • #9
                  My eye was distracted in the first few photos by the nice job you did on the truck!

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