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Jordan Truck Build

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  • Carl_B
    replied
    Of course you were Greg...and I guess you could now say: "the JIG is up"!

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Carl, I've been quietly watching this thread, and I've got to say, that I love that Jordan Jig idea!

    Greg Shinnie

    Leave a comment:


  • Carl_B
    replied
    You're welcome Jeff.

    I have never built any Jordan wagons.(Assuming you mean the horse and buggy type)

    But you could apply the same "jig" principle to them with larger square stock.

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  • jschumaker
    replied
    Many thanks, Carl. Would a similar jig work for wagons?

    Jeff S.

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  • Carl_B
    replied
    Thank you Pete, Bruce, Frank, George and Jeff !

    Nice way to dodge the bullet Frank.

    Glad you all liked the jig. Jeff, the square stock is 3/16th."

    Leave a comment:


  • jschumaker
    replied
    Carl,

    Great jig. What is the size of the square stock you use?

    Jeff S.

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  • George_D
    replied
    Beautiful trucks,, Karl and thanks for the good info on assembling the wheels.

    George

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  • Frank_Palmer
    replied
    Excellent job, fortunately for me these predate Wrecker’s. Phew that was close.

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  • Dutchman
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by Orionvp17


    Carl,

    These are very nicely done, and I love the jig idea. I need to build one....


    I echo Pete's comments.

    Leave a comment:


  • Orionvp17
    replied
    Carl,

    These are very nicely done, and I love the jig idea. I need to build one....

    Or more....

    Thanks!

    Pete

    in Michigan

    Leave a comment:


  • Carl_B
    replied
    I glued down the seat to the base frame, and attached the steering wheel to column. The column already has a square base cast into it.



    Once dry, glued steering column in front of seat. If you want a LP in there, now's your chance!



    Attached hood and radiator (separate pieces) to front fender section.



    Glued down the cab body over frame with seat and steering wheel inside. The cab walls fit over and around the front of the base.



    Glued down wood covered payload onto frame.



    The secret weapon. I built this jig to keep wheels and axles tight, aligned, and in place for the glue to set.

    I glued 4 pieces of square stock to contain the wheels upright, and the axle will be supported to dry as well. Between 15 mm and 20 mm (distance from tire to tire) covers most of them.

    I made several sets on a single 1 x 2 board. There are front and rear slots for cars and light trucks, and larger Jordan trucks. There are a few millimeter differences between all of them. A stop keeps the axle and the wheels square to each other.

    I usually put the wheels on the axle, slide it in place, then drop some Ambroid Pro Weld onto the joint. Let it sit for at least 30 minutes.



    Payload and cab now glued to front fender section.



    Upside down to glue front axle with wheels, into the provided slot behind radiator. After using a slower setting glue (like Testors), I flip the model over and let it rest on a flat and level surface, allowing both wheels to touch. If they don't, I may drop a penny on top of the roof or payload to "settle it down".

    Steering rods can be glued over this axle, but I can never see them, so I don't bother.



    The rear axle gets a spring, which correctly adjust the height of these wheels, so it can't be skipped.

    I'm using the jig to hold the axle and wheels still, so I can cement the spring on top.



    Rear axle and wheels are glued in place and immediately set on level surface, I use a red ceramic tile. A touch of rust paint in random spots.

    The finished truck with two neighbors I also finished, a 1929 Model AA Ford Tank Truck, and the 1923 Mack Tank Truck. Those have more parts and different assemblies, and require even more patience and careful construction.



    A few final thoughts...

    1. Some of the trucks/cars have a definite "lean" towards the front, meaning they are not level front to back.

    2. I found I must be in a styrene "mode"... Admittedly, I am a "wood" guy, so these require a BENCH CLEARING from me. Actually, I build these in batches, in between my other work, not during.

    3. Walking away from the kit- for a break of some minutes, hours, even days helps the eyes, back and nerves.

    4. There is no rush to finish, take you're sweet old time.

    Try your hand at a Jordan...Use the first as a test to get the "feel" of it, then your second should turn out much better. Then you can use the first as an abandoned jalopy in a junkyard!

    Good Luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • Carl_B
    replied
    Thank you Bruce, and you're welcome on the build thread.

    A big pile of un-built Jordan kits is not unusual...

    I hope you'll tackle one after I finish this up.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dutchman
    replied
    It is coming along nicely, Carl, and I appreciated the build thread. I won't tell you how many of these kits I have on the shelf - and I have yet to build one. :erm:

    Leave a comment:


  • Carl_B
    replied
    Thanks Mr. Magoun!

    Agreed, once you're completely exhausted at the finish, they do turn out well...

    I shall be careful with the cement, as I have experienced the magic "disappearing" styrene in the past! [:-censored]

    Leave a comment:


  • Orionvp17
    replied
    Nicely done, Carl, nicely done indeed.

    These little beasties are fabulous models, but be careful with the styrene cement; it eats them!

    Pete

    in Michigan

    Leave a comment:

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