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  • New soldier reporting in

    Ladies, and Gentlemen;

    I am new here, this is my first post, hence the reason it is here.

    I am a retired NCO from the U.S. Army. I have 23 years of active duty, followed by four more ADSW post 9/11. Because of my special skills I am occasionally recalled for short periods, not to exceed six months.

    I model the Pennsylvania RR in HO, primarily from the period 1865-1890, but I also model later periods, and subsequent RRs that operated in the same regions.

    The period I model primarily was before the PRR became the "Standard Railroad of the World", IE before it began producing standardized fleets of cars, and locomotives. In the years immediately following the Civil war, the USMRR began to sell off it's large fleet of standardized equipment, and PRR like many of the other (largely) northern roads bought this equipment at surplus sale prices. As such, the benefits of standardized equipment became blatantly obvious to the PRR mechanical dept. As such they began to look at standardizing, however the first internal PRR standardized car was the XA class house car (what is now known as a box car), which began to roll out of the Altoona car shops in 1879. Before that, many cars were built locally, from local materials, with standard running, and brake gear shipped in from Altoona.

    Since pictures OF rolling stock are scarce, and models even more so, the XA being the first model out there, I either scratch build, or take existing RTR, or kits, and kit bash them to meet the operating practices of the time.

    If anyone is interested, I will happily post pictures of some of the models I have made, and point out the modifications.

    Thank you for allowing me to join your community.

    SFC Bruce R. Gadbois

    U.S. Army retired (sort of)

  • #2
    Let me be the first to welcome you aboard Bruce. First of all, thank you for your years of service to our country. It is much appreciated! As a fellow PRR fan, I for one would be very interested to see your work, as I'm sure others will be as well. So please jump right in and share!
    Mark

    Comment


    • #3
      Bruce, welcome to the Forum. We are all about sharing photos of our models and explaining our modeling techniques, so please post away. Either the Rolling Stock Forum http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/f...sp?FORUM_ID=79 or the Early Rail Forum http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/f...sp?FORUM_ID=97 are appropriate for your topic.

      Here is a link to a thread on how to post a picture directly to the Forum. http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/t...TOPIC_ID=15110
      Bruce

      Comment


      • #4
        Welcome aboard, Bruce. I'm a Pennsy fan, but my interests are the steam era after they became the "The Standard Railroad of the World" Still, I'd love to see what you've been building.

        I spent 24 years in the Army and there are a few others like us here on the forum.

        George
        The sky is not my limit, it's my playground.

        Comment


        • #5
          Bruce -

          Welcome to the forum. I extend that welcome even though you ID yourself as Cavalry Troope!

          Edward Traxler SFC Ret. variously - 72B, 19K and 55B/89B

          Comment


          • #6
            Thank you all.

            I will have to go dig out the digital camera, and then figure out how to download them to this new puter.

            BTW, I started my career in MI, (yes I know that is an oxymoron), went to Spec Ops in an intel capacity, I was NOT on an A team, just so no one gets the wrong idea. I moved over to a mounted recon detachment, and YES we had horses, hence the Cavalry Trooper moniker. I have been riding for 50 years now, since I was a little kid, so for me it was a natural transition, besides, why walk, when you can ride?

            When that unit was disbanded, I moved over to forward observer for arty, but was getting too long in the tooth to sleep under bushes anymore, so when an opportunity came up to go fix weapons, I took it. Ended my career nursemaiding parts in a warehouse, and answering dumb questions from ROTC trained second LTs.

            my common nickname is, gee big surprise, Horse.

            Comment


            • #7
              Welcome aboard, Bruce! Enjoy the ride!

              For the record, be glad that those Second Johns were at least smart enough to ask the dumb questions!

              Anchors Aweigh!

              Pete

              in Michigan

              Comment


              • #8
                Bruce,

                Welcome to the crew.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Welcome to the forum. Look forward to seeing some of your work.
                  -- KP --

                  Life is to short to build all of the models I want to.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    quote:


                    Originally posted by Orionvp17


                    For the record, be glad that those Second Johns were at least smart enough to ask the dumb questions!

                    Pete

                    in Michigan


                    Pete;

                    Thanks for the greeting. No offense intended, but most ROTC officers assumed they knew what what going on, my experience has been that they didn't know squat, unless an NCO taught it to them, but enough of this, and back to trains.

                    Found the camera, now have to recharge the batteries.

                    Horse

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:


                      Originally posted by CavalryTrooper25


                      quote:


                      Originally posted by Orionvp17


                      For the record, be glad that those Second Johns were at least smart enough to ask the dumb questions!

                      Pete

                      in Michigan


                      Pete;

                      Thanks for the greeting. No offense intended, but most ROTC officers assumed they knew what what going on, my experience has been that they didn't know squat, unless an NCO taught it to them, but enough of this, and back to trains.

                      Found the camera, now have to recharge the batteries.

                      Horse



                      My point exactly.

                      Pete

                      in Michigan

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Welcome Bruce, I would like to see your work. Please go through the learning curve and post some pictures in the early rail forum.
                        It's only make-believe

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          It's been my experience that there are only dumb answers, Not dumb questions. And most Noncoms would agree...I taught ROTC advanced Infantry, Mechanized, in the First Inf Div.

                          We ran those cadets harder and treated them worse then we did basic trainees. Most measured up pretty well. Of course that was 1971. A completely different world and a completely different solider.....


                          Ted

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Welcome to the crew Cav. Like you I had to deal with the ROTC butters. We had this one time that we went to the field. The week of Field and the week before the field exercise it decided to Monsoon. Well when they put us out in our defensive positions it decided to let up for a while at least 3 days. So back to the positions we when with out 2.5 tons, our 1 tons and our 1/4 tons. Well second night, Started to Monsoon again and the defensive position that we were in was a muck area. Well by Morning, Our Butter decided that we should get our vehicles out of the area and back onto the truck road. Well we started the convoy out of the area. Their were like 6-7 vehicles that we had to out of the defensive position down this path with ditches on either side. Well after starting the 4th 2.5 ton down the path Ruts were getting so deep that the 2.5 tons were grounding out. Called for the Engineers to bring one of the Cat Dozers back to us to pull the Duce's out. But with the rains even the dozer wouldn't beable to pull the Duce out. So this Hair brained Butter decided to take one of the 1 tons with trailer and head down this path before they took a 2.5 ton down it. Well as he was Gunning it and slopping and sliding all around. He ended it up in the side ditch, Front bumper of the truck against the tree and the end of the trailer against the other tree. Well, We had to call the engineers in to Bring a Dozer back with a Chainsaw. Himmmmmm I wonder what ever happened to that Butter after that tactical. I didn't see him too much more after that. Just one of my experiences with The Indiana National Guard. Welcome again and Enjoy your stay with this Crew! Kevin Sgt. Commo Section

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My favorite story from "instructing" cadets, was when we took them out on the night nav course. I had recently sewn on my E-5 stripes (figuratively speaking), and was assigned as one of the cadre/observers for one of their platoons. Their Army Officer leaders had scheduled it in such a way, that they ran the night nav, then ended at the MOUT site. (MOUT = Military Operations in an Urban Terrain). It was a small area set up like a town, with tight, narrow streets, a mixture of wooden buildings, and old containers (to simulate stone/concrete buildings). In other words, your medium, and heavier weapons could penetrate the wood, but not the steel (concrete). The range guys had all sorts of trip flares, and whiz bangs, and what not, as well as smoke, and fire, and recordings of weapons fire, and crying/moaning civilians, etc, etc.

                              Now, the regular Army officers had set this up, so that the kids (college age) could go through both in one night. Not recommended, but not our call as trainers. For the MOUT site, they were issued 60 rounds of rubber bullet 5.56 NATO, left over from the Viet Nam era riot days. Since their officers wanted to bang off, and go to the O club, they decided to issue the ammo before the night nav. Again, not recommended, but also not our call.

                              We did insist that the cadets be instructed that in no uncertain terms were they to open the ammo cartons, load any of the ammo into their magazines, nor place a loaded magazine into their weapons until arrival at the MOUT site, and only after we, the trainers, reviewed all safety procedures, and then specifically instructed them to do so.

                              Now their company was broken up into four platoons, and each platoon had it's own route to the MOUT site, and none of them would be within a klik of each other, so they couldn't help each other out. Apparently, they had some prize for the first platoon to arrive at the site. Anyway, I was off with one of the platoons. I was instructed to observe only. I was not to interact with the cadets, nor give them any guidance, unless I observed safety issues. They had three hours to complete the course, and I could only intervene if they were lost, five hours had expired, and their team leader acknowledged he was lost, IE he was quitting the exercise.

                              Off we go into the darkness. The platoon leader actually seemed pretty good, he set out flankers, a point team, rear guard, and had his cadet NCOs spread out along the column to enforce light, and noise discipline. Found out later on, he had been an E-5 in the real Army.

                              Anyway, not all of his minions were as sharp as he.  We got to an obstacle, where a large tree was laying over the path. His point people stopped, and called him up (correct so far). I drifted over to listen to the conversation, even though I could not advise at all.  The lead point man wanted to skirt the obstacle, but the platoon leader realized that this path led them right to this obstacle, for the purpose of forcing them to breech it to the standard.  The first point man handed his weapon to the second, and climbed over.  The second handed the first guys weapon over, then his own, and he climbed over.  Then the first moved out away from the obstacle, while the third handed his weapon over, then climbed over.  Once over the third took up the post, and the second guy moved out, and the first moved further out.  So, it becomes apparent that they, or at least the platoon leader knew how this exercise was supposed to go, so I backed off, and skirted the obstacle to observe the far side teams.  After about fifteen troops had crossed, the point team moved out about 100 meters, and two flanker teams moved out to the edges about fifty meters.  Again so far so good.  Now I had NVGs (Night Vision Goggles), as did the platoon leader, the lead point man, and one each of the flankers, so I could observe the whole game.  After the fist squad had come across, and the second was starting over, I moved forward to about half way between the obstacle, and the point team.  Suddenly, there is a loud bang (an M-16 going off), and I feel pressure, and pain in my left butt cheek.  I hear the platoon leader shouting "cease fire, cease fire", and other cadet NCOs starting to shout orders.  Then the platoon leader calls out for any injury reports.  I respond that I have been hit, and raise my weapon over my head.  The platoon leader comes running over to me, while two of the cadet NCOs are screaming at some cadidiot at the obstacle.  Another cadet officer comes forward, but without NVGs he can't actually see much, but someone calls him over to us. By now the platoon leader, and I have exchanged enough info for him to realize A:, I'm not one of his cadets, and B: I am wounded, and bleeding.  He calls for the medic, and the order is passed back along the column.

                              A couple minutes go by, and up comes running the medic.  Turns out she is a very cute 20 year old, blonde.  By now there are several red, and blue lens flashlights glowing, so when she gets to us, she asks who is hurt, and in what way.  I answer that I am, and I have been shot.  She asks where.  I said, matter of factly, in my left butt cheek.  By now, most of the flashlights have removed their night lenses, so are glowing in nice bright white light for her to see better.  She blushes, it was obvious to see, but she chokes out that she needs to see it, and squats down to get level with my butt.  I asked her if she wanted me to drop my pants, and she chokes out, yes.  So, I did.  It was summer, hot, humid, and so I was commando, IE no underwear.  Now, this cutie is squatting right in front of me, and I have dropped trou, with no undies.  This female cadet medic is not behind me, she had squatted down in front of me, and when she looks up from her medic bag, all I heard was "Oh My".  Then she whispered, could you turn around please, so I did.  

                              She mopped off the worst of the blood, packed the wound, covered it with a large gauze pad, and taped the crap out of it, and told me there was nothing more she could do here.  I thanked her, and pulled up my pants, and informed the platoon leader, that we had already wasted enough time, but that I suggested he confiscate the weapon from whoever it was who had shot me.

                              He did.  We finished the nav course, got to the MOUT site, and I released them.  Because of the delay, his platoon was third in (probably would have been first, except for the delay).  His RTO (Radio Telephone Operator) had notified Range Control that we had a minor wound, that would need an ambulance to meet us at the MOUT site, but that helo extraction was not necessary.  While the platoon was briefed for safety (a little late now), and prepped for the MOUT training, the cadet who had disobeyed the safety procedures was segregated, and taken under guard by cadets.  I reported to the ambulance crew, and they whisked me away to the post hospital.

                              At the post hospital ER, the doc cleaned the wound again, pulled out the chunk of rubber bullet (I asked for it, but they would not give it to me), inserted a piece of surgical tubing, and stitched the skin level of the wound closed around the tube.  He then covered the area with a large gauze pad, gave me a shot of antibiotics, and had the MPs called to transport me back to my unit.  MPs had to transport me because I had two weapons, and sensitive government property, NVGs, and special radios which I could not transport in a POV.

                              Back at my unit I had been given the next day off by the docs, and was ordered to report back to the hospital the next afternoon for a recheck, and further treatment.  The next day, I heard that the dipstick who shot me, was the cadet Company XO, and felt that he knew better than a bunch of regular Army NCOs, so loaded his weapon, and even charged it.  But even more than that, he decided he didn't have to cross the obstacle like everyone else, so he climbed over carrying his weapon himself.  When he slid off the top of the huge tree, to land, he lost his footing, and fired his loaded, charged, and not on safe weapon, because his trigger finger was in the trigger guard, instead of being indexed like you are supposed to.  Well, from what I heard, he had been busted back to regular cadet, and was going to be charged with some offense.  Needless to say, his military career was likely to have darkened considerably over this incident.  I had no more contact with this company, or any other companies of their Battalion for the remaining weeks they were on post.

                              But I did get to enjoy the shenanigans of a different cadet unit a few weeks later.

                              Horse

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