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  • Bernd
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by NE Brownstone


    "Trouble is I've got to plumb in an air line from the garage."

    Do it! I have my compressor outside in a room I built off of my carport. I ran 1/2 copper tubing for airlines through the carport, into my office and down into my basement where I do my casting and painting. It is so nice to quick connect whatever anywhere in my work areas. just having the ability to blow sanding dust, filings and other hard to remove grit makes it worth every penny I invested in my system.


    Oh it's a definite for next summer. Have to move to much to get at it where it goes through the wall. It's supposed to snow hear in the next couple days. Not to enthused working in the cold. I can wait.

    We return you to your regular scheduled "Fast Tracks kit or pre-made" program.[^]

    Bernd

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  • Nelson458
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by thayer


    A great mini lesson Coaltrain, thank you for posting. I am just dipping my toe into the hand laid track pool for a mini On30 layout I have planned with 12-inch curves.

    Another plan is to not center the gaps. but cut them randomly between the rails. My thought was that if they remain somewhat visible they won't look so intentional if they don't line up.

    I hope I am not off base with these assumptions, but if I am, it won't be that big a deal to replace some of the track on a 3x4.

    Thayer


    Thayer, no, your not off base, in fact you gave me an idea. Although I haven't done one yet, just got my jigs last week, but the real reason for the copper is to solder the rail to it..right?? So, why not remove nearly all the copper except where it needs soldering???

    Another note, thinking the ties will now be a bit low, glue some 1 x 8 or 1x 10, whatever the width is, to the removed solder sections. A little more work, but might be worth a shot.

    Just a thought.

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  • NE_Brownstone
    replied
    "Trouble is I've got to plumb in an air line from the garage."

    Do it! I have my compressor outside in a room I built off of my carport. I ran 1/2 copper tubing for airlines through the carport, into my office and down into my basement where I do my casting and painting. It is so nice to quick connect whatever anywhere in my work areas. just having the ability to blow sanding dust, filings and other hard to remove grit makes it worth every penny I invested in my system.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernd
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by thayer


    Bernd, thanks for the kind words. Given that On30 is HO standard gauge, my formula should work well for you also. I ripped apart some Atlas C83 flex track to source the rail and measured its base at .080 wide. I then made two passes using a 1/16 end mill, with the second offset .018 from the first. I ran 10,000 rpm on the spindle, .010 DoC and 30 ipm feed. I think that the end mill could handle more, but then again this is hobby time and it doesn't really matter if it takes 30 minutes to mill instead of 20. I am not trying to make any money, just having fun trying to not break any tools while solving a puzzle. I made 3 passes for a total rail groove depth of .030. The tie pockets are .085 deep, based on the 1/16 CB material I bought at Radio Shack and cut up on my Byrnes table saw. I know, the numbers don't add up. That's because I wanted to be sure of intimate contact between the rail and tie. I also figured the slight air gap would help keep the heat out of the fixture.

    Thayer


    Ok thanks for the info. I''' be using code 83,70 and 55 for the rails sizes. Un fortunately the Sherline spindle is only a few thousand. I'll need to try the air spindle I bought with the machine. Trouble is I've got to plumb in an air line from the garage. Have an 80 gallon tank with twin cylinder pump. Perhaps that happen this coming summer.

    Bernd

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  • thayer
    replied
    How about that! I fixed an issue I didn't even know existed. Just seemed like a sensical way to do it.

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  • hminky
    replied
    Found that the paper shim raised the ties for better contact with the rail in the Fast Track jigs.

    The jig you made should be fine.


    Harold

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  • thayer
    replied
    Harold, thanks for the tinning tip. Not sure what the paper shim does for you as the upper copper face can't transmit heat into the jig efficiently. The rail? Well now that is a different matter. I realized I needed to make up a frog jig as soon as I tried soldering this pair the first time. Once they were held in air, soldering the frog point looked like a training video.

    Bernd, thanks for the kind words. Given that On30 is HO standard gauge, my formula should work well for you also. I ripped apart some Atlas C83 flex track to source the rail and measured its base at .080 wide. I then made two passes using a 1/16 end mill, with the second offset .018 from the first. I ran 10,000 rpm on the spindle, .010 DoC and 30 ipm feed. I think that the end mill could handle more, but then again this is hobby time and it doesn't really matter if it takes 30 minutes to mill instead of 20. I am not trying to make any money, just having fun trying to not break any tools while solving a puzzle. I made 3 passes for a total rail groove depth of .030. The tie pockets are .085 deep, based on the 1/16 CB material I bought at Radio Shack and cut up on my Byrnes table saw. I know, the numbers don't add up. That's because I wanted to be sure of intimate contact between the rail and tie. I also figured the slight air gap would help keep the heat out of the fixture.

    Thayer

    Leave a comment:


  • Bernd
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by thayer


    I based the turnout design on that arc and machined my own assembly fixtures as seen, in all places, in Richard Gardner's boxcar thread.

    Thayer


    Thayer,

    I'm impressed with the fixture. Very nice. I'm looking at doing something similar in HO standard and narrow gauge. What size of end mill are you using?

    Bernd

    Leave a comment:


  • hminky
    replied
    Tin the pc ties and put a paper shim under them in the jig.

    Found that makes soldering easier.

    Harold

    Leave a comment:


  • thayer
    replied
    A great mini lesson Coaltrain, thank you for posting. I am just dipping my toe into the hand laid track pool for a mini On30 layout I have planned with 12-inch curves. I based the turnout design on that arc and machined my own assembly fixtures as seen, in all places, in Richard Gardner's boxcar thread.

    http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/t...1&whichpage=35

    Below is my test fit waiting for a little more work before solder, if you don't feel like clicking through.



    As an absolute beginner who doesn't know what works and what doesn't, I was thinking about the same issues with the PC ties that you highlight. One plan is to give them a wipe with some bondo to fill the gap and provide a little texture. Another plan is to not center the gaps. but cut them randomly between the rails. My thought was that if they remain somewhat visible they won't look so intentional if they don't line up. And nothing says they have to be perpendicular to the tie either, right? I hope I am not off base with these assumptions, but if I am, it won't be that big a deal to replace some of the track on a 3x4.

    Thayer

    Leave a comment:


  • Coaltrain
    replied
    I have scratchbuilt many HO turnouts using weathered rail, it can be done but all spots need to have the weathering removed, I used a wire brush wheel in a Dremel tool, and it is a pain. I switched to non-weathered rail and it is a lot easier.

    I use Fast Tracks point and frog jigs but I do not use the big turnout jigs. One huge advantage to handlaid turnouts is the ability to build flowing (some slightly curved)turnouts, which allow you to make track arrangements that is just not possible (without a lot of work) with pre-fab turnouts. To me, using the Fast Track turnout jigs basically gives you homemade pre-fab turnouts. Also, I don't like having to blend the PC ties with the wood ties, they always seem to stand out, partly because they are really smooth looking and partly because there is a gap filed into the top surface of the turnout.

    I find it easier to print out the Fast tracks templates and use those to locate the turnouts on the layout, then if I need a special curved turnout or built some special turnouts in a tight space I use some flex track to make my own template. To use the flex track just pin down the flex track in one route, then pin one down on top in the other route and trace the outside of the ties on the roadbed, which will be your guide for laying the ties down and for marking the location of the frog point and the throw bar (head block ties). you could also place a sheet of paper over the flex track and rub a pencil on it to transfer the rail locations to the paper, although you will have to tape it down to the layout, rub transfer one route, lift the paper and remove one piece of flex track, lay the paper back down and rub transfer the other route.

    After you have traced the outsides of the ties glue down your turnout ties, trim the ends, use some sandpaper to level the ties, stain them in place, and then glue down your ballast. Then use the Fast track frog and point jig that is closest to the turn number you think you have and build the turnout in place. If you use the weathered rail all you will have to do is clean the weathering off in the area of the frog. Since you glued down the ballast already the area is finished (other than some paint touch up around the frog) and you don't have to worry about glue getting into to turnout from gluing ballast down.

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  • resqrk
    replied
    I love my Fast tracks jigs but you can usually get the tools cheaper locally.....

    Leave a comment:


  • NE_Brownstone
    replied
    The nice thing about Fast Track fixtures is that they hold their value.

    Leave a comment:


  • Nelson458
    replied
    Just getting caught up on my own thread . I don't get a subscribe link, so I have to physically come here each time.

    Good tips. I just got the fast Tracks jigs in the mail today. I bought a few extra 'tools' too, expensive, but I think the end result will be worth the cost. So....next comes the scary part, assembling. I might try the weathered rail on the outside to see how it goes, cleaning the bottom of the rail, but will start with the non-weathered.

    But to painting, I would probably use an air brush, and probably Vallejo ?? paints. Any further thoughts on this part?

    Leave a comment:


  • dave1905
    replied
    By the way, don't solder wires to the sides of the rail, its ugly, solder the wires to the base. Make the "L" in the end of the wire run parallel to the ties and crossways to the rail. The joint gets buried in the ballast.

    You can solder weathered rail, you just have to clean it (you should also clean un-weathered rail for a good joint). I normally use un-weathered rail and spray paint it roof brown, then build both track and switches with the painted rail, using a "bright boy" or wire brush in a Dremel to clean off the paint where I will need to solder to it (frogs, points, guardrails, bases where feeders go.)

    Have used weathered rail for track, still have to clean off the weathering to solder joints and feeders.

    I don't use Fast Tracks, learned how to lay switches back in the 1970's before Fast Tracks was even thought of. DIY switches are an option (people used those methods for 100% of handlaying for the 60-70 years before the jigs). You are trading money for time, since there is a longer learning curve with DIY. Once you learn DIY, you can lay any size or configuration of switch. There are lots of different approaches to building switches, don't be afraid to try different methods and find the one you like best or that fits your construction situation.

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