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  • #31
    Harold, thanks for the tinning tip. Not sure what the paper shim does for you as the upper copper face can't transmit heat into the jig efficiently. The rail? Well now that is a different matter. I realized I needed to make up a frog jig as soon as I tried soldering this pair the first time. Once they were held in air, soldering the frog point looked like a training video.

    Bernd, thanks for the kind words. Given that On30 is HO standard gauge, my formula should work well for you also. I ripped apart some Atlas C83 flex track to source the rail and measured its base at .080 wide. I then made two passes using a 1/16 end mill, with the second offset .018 from the first. I ran 10,000 rpm on the spindle, .010 DoC and 30 ipm feed. I think that the end mill could handle more, but then again this is hobby time and it doesn't really matter if it takes 30 minutes to mill instead of 20. I am not trying to make any money, just having fun trying to not break any tools while solving a puzzle. I made 3 passes for a total rail groove depth of .030. The tie pockets are .085 deep, based on the 1/16 CB material I bought at Radio Shack and cut up on my Byrnes table saw. I know, the numbers don't add up. That's because I wanted to be sure of intimate contact between the rail and tie. I also figured the slight air gap would help keep the heat out of the fixture.

    Thayer

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    • #32
      Found that the paper shim raised the ties for better contact with the rail in the Fast Track jigs.

      The jig you made should be fine.


      Harold

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      • #33
        How about that! I fixed an issue I didn't even know existed. Just seemed like a sensical way to do it.

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        • #34
          quote:


          Originally posted by thayer


          Bernd, thanks for the kind words. Given that On30 is HO standard gauge, my formula should work well for you also. I ripped apart some Atlas C83 flex track to source the rail and measured its base at .080 wide. I then made two passes using a 1/16 end mill, with the second offset .018 from the first. I ran 10,000 rpm on the spindle, .010 DoC and 30 ipm feed. I think that the end mill could handle more, but then again this is hobby time and it doesn't really matter if it takes 30 minutes to mill instead of 20. I am not trying to make any money, just having fun trying to not break any tools while solving a puzzle. I made 3 passes for a total rail groove depth of .030. The tie pockets are .085 deep, based on the 1/16 CB material I bought at Radio Shack and cut up on my Byrnes table saw. I know, the numbers don't add up. That's because I wanted to be sure of intimate contact between the rail and tie. I also figured the slight air gap would help keep the heat out of the fixture.

          Thayer


          Ok thanks for the info. I''' be using code 83,70 and 55 for the rails sizes. Un fortunately the Sherline spindle is only a few thousand. I'll need to try the air spindle I bought with the machine. Trouble is I've got to plumb in an air line from the garage. Have an 80 gallon tank with twin cylinder pump. Perhaps that happen this coming summer.

          Bernd
          New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

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          • #35
            "Trouble is I've got to plumb in an air line from the garage."

            Do it! I have my compressor outside in a room I built off of my carport. I ran 1/2 copper tubing for airlines through the carport, into my office and down into my basement where I do my casting and painting. It is so nice to quick connect whatever anywhere in my work areas. just having the ability to blow sanding dust, filings and other hard to remove grit makes it worth every penny I invested in my system.
            Russ

            It's not Practice makes Perfect, It's Perfect Practice makes Perfect

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            • #36
              quote:


              Originally posted by thayer


              A great mini lesson Coaltrain, thank you for posting. I am just dipping my toe into the hand laid track pool for a mini On30 layout I have planned with 12-inch curves.

              Another plan is to not center the gaps. but cut them randomly between the rails. My thought was that if they remain somewhat visible they won't look so intentional if they don't line up.

              I hope I am not off base with these assumptions, but if I am, it won't be that big a deal to replace some of the track on a 3x4.

              Thayer


              Thayer, no, your not off base, in fact you gave me an idea. Although I haven't done one yet, just got my jigs last week, but the real reason for the copper is to solder the rail to it..right?? So, why not remove nearly all the copper except where it needs soldering???

              Another note, thinking the ties will now be a bit low, glue some 1 x 8 or 1x 10, whatever the width is, to the removed solder sections. A little more work, but might be worth a shot.

              Just a thought.
              Tony Burgess

              Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

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              • #37
                quote:


                Originally posted by NE Brownstone


                "Trouble is I've got to plumb in an air line from the garage."

                Do it! I have my compressor outside in a room I built off of my carport. I ran 1/2 copper tubing for airlines through the carport, into my office and down into my basement where I do my casting and painting. It is so nice to quick connect whatever anywhere in my work areas. just having the ability to blow sanding dust, filings and other hard to remove grit makes it worth every penny I invested in my system.


                Oh it's a definite for next summer. Have to move to much to get at it where it goes through the wall. It's supposed to snow hear in the next couple days. Not to enthused working in the cold. I can wait.

                We return you to your regular scheduled "Fast Tracks kit or pre-made" program.[^]

                Bernd
                New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

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