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Projects in Progress on the Southern Central RR

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  • quote:


    Originally posted by Bill Gill


    A interesting load of lumber. I made the same discovery about work vs material saved with a load of boards

    Do you have any idea why the ends of the flatcar sides taper?


    Bill,
    Thank you.

    Where the savings is worth the extra work is when individual boards are long, as in a pile of lumber, not short like my lumber load, or when one wants to hide a weight inside the load.

    The taper in the side sills: the center and intermediate sills in cars of the last quarter of the 19th century were pretty standardized on 4 1/2 by 8 to 5 by 9 inches in cross section. As Voss explained in 1892, flat cars and gondolas, not having sides to add to the strength of the frame, needed thicker side sills on the order of 10 to 12 inches. This thickness (vertical dimension) could be maintained the length of the car, and sometimes was, but end sills needed to be cut into the side sills. That's not a difficult task in itself, but the car-length sills were tenoned into the end sills, and as Voss goes on to explain, tenoning machines did not work in this situation. Therefore, the side sills were tapered to match the end sills.

    Does that make sense?

    Mike
    _________________________________________________

    Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

    Comment


    • Thank you Andre, Bernd, Bruce and David!
      _________________________________________________

      Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

      Comment


      • Mike, that's today's "learn something new", thanks for the explanation.

        dave
        Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

        Comment


        • quote:


          Originally posted by deemery


          Mike, that's today's "learn something new", thanks for the explanation.

          dave


          You’re welcome, Dave.
          And thank you for being such an avid student. Pop quiz tomorrow.

          Mike
          _________________________________________________

          Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

          Comment


          • Mike, yup, makes sense. Thanks.

            Comment



            • Looks good Mike, sometimes we try too hard.
              Frank

              Comment


              • quote:


                Originally posted by Frank Palmer



                Looks good Mike, sometimes we try too hard.


                Thank you, Frank.
                Yes, I plunged right into cutting 200 little pieces of wood, cutting a few at a sitting between other tasks, then staining them. I think it was when I was gluing them down that I realized what a mistake I'd made. Too late.

                Oh well. Live and learn.

                Mike
                _________________________________________________

                Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

                Comment


                • Mike, seems its been a long time since we've seen any overview photos of progress on the layout as a whole. How about an update?

                  Second Question, wondering if you have used the Sanborn Insurance maps from the Library of Congress to help with your planning of features and Industries?

                  I know there are maps from around 1890 on their site.
                  Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

                  Comment


                  • David:

                    Here's a tour from one end to the other. First, Auburn New York.














                    _________________________________________________

                    Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

                    Comment


                    • Part 2 of the tour: Alderson, Pennsylvania.



                      The kindling wood factory:



                      Lehigh Valley freight house:



                      This is the newest part of the layout. I'm redoing it extensively and have about a half-dozen structures to build.

                      Mike
                      _________________________________________________

                      Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

                      Comment


                      • wow, just wow... Mike your commitment to building these structures to spec, building the freight to spec and having a simple realistic track arrangement has really paid off in modeling that really looks like the Lehigh Valley with all of its idiosyncrasies. Nothing here says- oh there's that old Fine Scale miniatures kit again. Great story on how you arrived here with the research like the Sanborn maps and such.

                        You're going to need to paint up a late 1800s loco to blend in more in some of these shots now. Looking forward to seeing how this develops.

                        Blair

                        Comment


                        • Mike,

                          You have some very nice work on display there! Congratulations!

                          Pete

                          in Michigan

                          Comment


                          • Looking so Good Mike. I like how your urban development looks evolved rather than planed. You have planned well indeed.

                            Bob
                            It's only make-believe

                            Comment


                            • MUCH progress since I visited, but then that was many years ago.

                              dave
                              Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

                              Comment


                              • Seems like forever to set tortoises and wiring on the North Coast Railroad. Glad to see you have been moving along.
                                Home of the HOn3 North Coast Railroad, along the shores of Lake Ontario.

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