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  • Anyone Recognize This Location?



    My friend, Stan Conley, brought this mounted photograph out to our SLD NMRA meeting this morning with the question being..."Where is this location?"



    Stan and I thought that the scenery resembled the landscape found along the St. Lawrence River in Quebec, although this river is definitely not the St. Lawrence, which is much broader...perhaps a tributary emptying into the St. Lawrence?

    The station looks "CP" in colours but the passenger car looks "CN" or Grand Trunk. I also thought that the scene may be from Nova Scotia or New Brunswick. Perhaps the large structure on the hillside across the river may jog someone's memory. Could it be the St. John River acting as the border between New Brunswick and Maine.



    Or...perhaps the image is taken somewhere in the territory near where I model...New England? Conn River? The bridge spanning the river certainly is interesting in design and appearance.



    Or...do we head even further south along the US seaboard? Not sure. Perhaps some of the structures in the town will jog someone's memory.

    Yes, it would be fun to find out where this location is and check out Google Earth to see how things have changed from long ago when this photograph was taken. Thanks, in advance, for anyone's help! [:-apple][:-apple][:-apple]
    Mike Hamer

    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

    http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca

    http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca

    http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

  • #2
    It is NOT the Fort Kent International bridge. That one is only 3 spans.

    Something about the landscape and sloping hills leads me to think this is more likely in Canada.
    Dave Mason
    On30Kits.com

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    • #3
      I would tend to agree that this is on the Eastern seaboard of Canada. The types of conifers seen in this picture are fairly consistent with that area and are not really found in New England.

      An intriguing mystery!
      Arthur

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      • #4
        The river is tidal, and freezes. The railroad appears to come downstream to the station, but ends at the water tank and doesn't appear to have ever rounded the point to the far left. Fancy station for the end of a branch, but the big building across the river indicates the town is a regional center of some sort. It isn't any place I've visited in NS, but it could be north of Halifax. It doesn't look tidal enough to be the Canadian part of the Bay of Fundy.
        James

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        • #5
          The water can't be very deep as there are no ships there at all. Does look like one barge. Also, the bridge doesn't lift. The ground looks like it was worked over by glacier action and isn't high enough to be on the Connecticut River. I drove down that this past summer a good deal of the length and it's much higher and steeper sides for the most part.

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          • #6
            I don't think it is St. John River in NB Mike. I grew up on that river and have traveled the area many times. My guess would be somewhere in Quebec.
            http://www.dougcoffey.com/html/model_railroad.html

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            • #7
              Whatever that big brick building with the white roof is, across the river, it has a twin visible off to the left, near the center of the pic.

              Comment


              • #8
                Good eyes Ray, I missed that.

                I spent almost and hour yesterday Googling bridges throughout New England with no luck.

                That bridge is unique with the leading ramps on both sides and the space in the middle.

                All the other 4 span bridges I found didn't have that mid space.
                Dave Mason
                On30Kits.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  If I'm correctly seeing a tide line on the rip-rap facing of the fill, there's no need to look south of Passamaquoddy Inlet. The station is not typical of the Maine Central and there wasn't anyplace where an MEC line dead-ended at the water such that you could have the sun at that angle. The geography of Calais & Eastport is wrong.
                  James

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                  • #10
                    Thanks so much for the input, so far, fellas. When I get some free time, I'm going to check river crossings along those rivers which empty into the St. Lawrence. I'll also check rivers in southern Quebec in the region known as the Eastern Townships. We'll get to the bottom of this image before too long, me hopes!
                    Mike Hamer

                    Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

                    http://www.bostonandmaine.blogspot.ca

                    http://www.craftsmanstructures.blogspot.ca

                    http://modelrailroadsivisit.blogspot.ca

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Maybe it's just me but it looks like narrow gauge track. If so, this would most likely be Newfoundland...

                      Bob

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                      • #12
                        Mike,

                        I have spent hours looking at tidal bays in NS with no luck yet. The color of the passenger car and station suggests a CP line. The sign at the end of the building is short suggesting the name of the town is short. The big building in the back with the gold tint would be a definite land mark. Slowly going crazy on this puzzle.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I railfanned Liverpool and Bridgewater, NS when the CN still went that far; not either of them. Neither is it Digby or Yarmouth on the Dominion Atlantic - rode through them. Too hilly for the St. Lawrence shore of NB, at least the easterly end, which I saw in daylight from the Ocean. River's too narrow for Gaspe', QC. A quick scan west to Quebec City doesn't show any likely inlets, and the CN there is an east-west main line. Some areas of the hill above the town are big groves of deciduous trees which from the color aren't birch/aspen - would that be likely in Newfoundland?
                          James

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                          • #14
                            A friend of mine who grew up in NFLD looked at the picture and is sure it is NOT Newfoundland.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Mike,

                              The photo appears to have been taken in the autumn, and looking toward the northeast. I've been up and down the St. Lawrence using satellite imaging, and have come up empty, and while using this as "entertainment" while sitting in hotel rooms over the last week, have come up empty in NS, NB, NL, the PQ, and anything "tidal" near the St. Lawrence. All of which means that I've probably missed something obvious.

                              Awhile back you posted a large aerial photo of another area, displayed at an OVAR meeting. What was the area of the "other" photo, and is it worth looking around in that vicinity?

                              Pete

                              in Michigan

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