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Kootenay Lake Sternwheeler Build

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  • Jeff,

    I've just been sitting in the weeds watching your ship progress. You're doing a marvelous job! Keep up the good work, I can't wait to see how you build your paddle wheel. You see, I've had my eye on a distant Southern cousin of your paddle wheeler and I'm taking notes! [:-captain]

    Greg R.

    Comment


    • Thanks guys.

      Carl, if I wait until Christmas I'll have to redo the hull as a steel hull to break the ice! 8D

      Greg, your taking me back man![:-hypnotized]

      Frank, I'll try to be more regular (maybe I need more fibre [}]). I should have an update later today.

      Bob, I know your watching and I've seen your ship modelling articles in "Ships in Scale" magazine. The bar is high.[:-scared]

      C.H. Thanks, hopefully you can learn from my many mistakes.[:-bigeyes2]

      Glen, it's coming.[:-captain]

      Dave, the paddle wheel is the next challenge. I'm not tossing in the towel yet![:-dopey]

      Greg R., thanks for the encouragement. I'm working on the paddle wheel and should have an update later.[:-pirate]

      Jeff

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      • Jeff,I guess one could say,You better get paddling on this!

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        • Jeff, I just finished the paddle wheel on the CR Lamb. That in itself was challenging enough.

          I REALLY applaud you on attempting to scratch build a much large one for your model. Put in a

          good supply of scotch under your work bench.

          John

          Comment


          • Thanks Greg and John,

            Greg, I'll post some paddle pictures here for you.

            John, it has been a challenge. It seems like I take 3 steps forward and 2 steps back most of the time. I have to say it's been a great learning experience though.

            Here's a few more pics for your perusal:

            The hubs for the centre of the paddles were made from styrene:



            The pencil line you see is for a piece of curved wood between the spokes to tie them together.

            I thought the best way to do this would be to make a complete ring at the appropriate radius and cut it into pieces:





            The completed ring:



            How it will fit onto the wheel:



            Stay tuned for the next exciting installment of "As The Paddle Wheel Turns"

            Jeff

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            • Jeff,

              Did you steam or soak the wood prior to bending it around your form? Also, are you using basswood or spruce? What kind of glue did you use on the rings? Dry for how long? Sorry for all the questions, but I'm just that kind of guy.

              Great tutorial!

              Thanks,

              Greg R.

              Comment


              • Jeff, you're doing absolutely superb work on this great model. I'd even go so far as to say that your methodology in manufacturing these parts (wheel, rim, spokes) is excellent.
                Gord Schneider

                President and Chief Engineer,

                Kootenay Lakes Steam & Navigation Company

                Comment


                • Jeff,

                  I am getting ready to build a sternwheeler from Inter-Action Enterprises. And I thought the kit going to be quite a challenge. Now I came across your version, and all I can say is how impressed I am. Don't know why I havn't seen your thread before. Either way, I am now going to follow along on your build while I do mine.

                  Good work,

                  Tony
                  Tony Burgess

                  Exploring the unknown requires tolerating uncertainty.~ Brian Greene

                  Comment


                  • quote:


                    Originally posted by JeffB


                    It seems like I take 3 steps forward and 2 steps back most of the time.



                    Jeff, you have to quit the line dancing lessons and spend more time on the paddlewheels.
                    Frank

                    Comment


                    • Thanks Greg, Gord, Tony, and Frank,

                      Ok Frank, I'll try to keep the line dancing to a minimum.

                      Tony, thanks for checking in. I've learned a lot from your builds as well. I've been following your build of your sternwheeler too.

                      Thanks Gord for your input and info. I will put it to good use.

                      Greg, the wood I used in the pictures is actually poplar. It was left over from the hull planking. I have a mini thickness sander intended for making stripwood for miniatures. It is thin enough that I didn't have to do anything with it to bend it. I simply laminated the strips to the desired thickness with yellow carpenters glue. I wasn't happy with it though so I redid the rings. It turns out it was harder to make the rings narrower once they were made. The spokes are make from 3x8 scale basswood so I took some 1x3 scale basswood and laminated 4 layers for a ring width of 3 inches to match the spokes with a thickness of 4 inches. The strips are so thin that they easily wrapped around the form without steaming. I used white glue this time but it doesn't really matter.

                      Once the ring is dry it is time to begin cutting and fitting:



                      That's all for now.

                      Jeff

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                      • Jeff,

                        Thanks for the details. By the way, it looks to me that you're cutting the ring into segments that fit between the spokes. Am I correct?

                        If so, it looks like a cup of coffee, soft music and plenty of time are in order here.

                        Greg R.

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                        • Greg, you got it. Each segment is individually cut to fit between the spokes. Plenty of patience and time is required.

                          Jeff

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                          • I thought I would take a brief break from the paddle wheel and work on the capstan that is at the bow of the boat. I wasn't able to find the capstan I was looking for so I put on together.

                            First I turned the main body on a mini lathe:



                            Next I glued some rings for the insertion points of the levers that are used to turn the capstan:



                            Then using some paper for the relief on the main body:



                            Finally, I painted Mr Surfacer 1000 to hide the wood grain an make it look like a metal capstan:



                            Now I can paint and weather it before mounting it on the deck.

                            Jeff

                            Comment


                            • It is now painted. I may weather it a bit more when I mount it.



                              My apologies for the poor quality of the photo. The colours appear correct for CPR sternwheelers. There is a photo of a capstan on a CPR sternwheeler in a book on the Kettle Valley Railway. I have based this on that as it is the best reference I have.

                              Jeff

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                              • Nicely done on and intricate detail. That's one item that I don't have a picture of from the Sicamous.

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