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Kootenay Lake Sternwheeler Build

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  • #16
    Hi Jeff.

    Just catching up here on this thread. Good work so far. I look forward to more.

    Comment


    • #17
      Thanks, Wes, for joining in.

      quote:


      Looking good so far Jeff!

      With even more views of your shop,I'm really starting to question if you are a modeler or a wood wright.

      Man that looks like a great place to work!


      Greg Shinnie



      Focus, Greg, focus.

      The next stage was to cut each of the slices of wood into the three dimensional shape of the hull lines that were marked:





      The wood was then laminated together to form the hull.





      The result is the rough shape of the hull with steps where the slabs are laminated. This was smoothed out to give the final shape of the hull. Unfortunately, I don't have pictures for this. I'll try to get some shots of the planked hull for next episode of "As the Paddlewheel Turns".

      Thanks for the encouragement guys. It is much appreciated.

      Jeff

      SDG

      Comment


      • #18
        Jeff! How can I stay focused when you are now featuring photo's showing your band saw & thickness planers,in the background

        Your hull is looking more ship shaped, and a little Viking like with all those clamps sticking out like oars. [:-viking]

        Greg Shinnie

        Comment


        • #19
          I'll join with Greg here Jeff-amazing tools at your disposal... [:-drool]

          That is not just any "shop"-could you be a woodworker by trade perhaps?

          Nice work by the way! (which would explain what we're seeing! )
          Carl

          Comment


          • #20
            Thanks Greg and Carl,

            The correct term for this method of hull construction is breadboard in ship modelling circles not bread and butter asI referred to it.

            Carl, I am not a woodworker by trade, just someone who can't seem to focus on one hobby. Hence, I'm still working on the Delwin's kit while I'm doing this.

            Jeff

            SDG

            Comment


            • #21
              Okay. Once the glue has dried and the clamps are removed you have the rough shape of the hull with a series of steps. These are smoothed out to remove the steps being careful not to remove more than necessary to preserve the hull lines. The result is the hull. This is planked over and the deck is cut and glued to the top once the hull is planked.





              This is a waterline model hence the very flat bottom which sits on the layout. Kootenay Lake sternwheelers had shallow hulls for traversing the lakes and rivers that did not have much depth.

              Jeff

              SDG

              Comment


              • #22
                Jeff,

                Looking really great, makes me want to start another ship model.

                BTW I've been a ship modeler for close to 70 years and I've always called it "Bread and Butter". :erm:

                I am enjoying your posts. :up: :up:

                Bob
                http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102

                http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51837

                Comment


                • #23
                  Hey Jeff, with each new step your sternwheeler is really starting to take shape.

                  Since this will be a waterline hull,I guess you have to make the paddle wheel flat as well in one spot.

                  Really enjoying watching your progress!

                  Greg Shinnie

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Thanks Bob and Greg.

                    Bob, I think either term may be acceptable. I was sure I had the term correct when I wrote theoriginal posting. I have a collection of ship modelling books and Ships in Scale Magazine for reference. After I had posted the term on the thread I was reading a recent Ships in Scale issue where the term breadboard was used. For clarity I thought I should correct it. I appreciate the comments of a seasoned modeller like yourself. It gives me a sense that I am on the right track.

                    Greg, I plan to have the bottom of the paddlewheel flat, as you point out, to maintain the waterline.

                    Jeff

                    SDG

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Hi Jeff, wow! I'm glad I tuned in - this is cool! Nice build - fun to see use of the real world tools (that is, big, full scale shop tools) on a build. Ill keep following

                      Nick

                      Comment


                      • #26

                        Hi Jeff - Boy do I look forward to this build. At the boat model conference this weekend

                        I saw this HO transfer barge used on the lakes. Thought you'd be interested.

                        http://www.traintroll.com/hotransferbarge.html

                        John Elwood

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Jeff, break out the champagne bottle it's almost time for the launching. Better use a scale bottle.
                          Frank

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Jeff, I can tell already that this is going to be great model. Looks fantastic so far.

                            Your plan may show it but I do want to submit one word of caution. Most people think that

                            the deeper the paddle blades go into the water, the better, more force. That's wrong. The

                            paddle blades went into the water very shallow. Anything more than that introduced more drag

                            than forward motion. When you get to making your paddle wheel, nothing more then a paddle

                            width should be flat for a waterline model.

                            I am happily following your work.

                            Bob
                            http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102

                            http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51837

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Thanks Nick, John, Frank, and Bob for your encouraging comments.

                              John, thanks for the link. There is a barge similar to the one you pointed out on the layout in the same vicinity that the Kokanee will be situated.

                              Frank, I have a long way to go before the champagne comes out. There's three decks to build yet!

                              Bob, thanks for the heads up. Even though the plans show it I probably would have been scratching my head over it.

                              Time for another update. Once the hull is planked it is time for the main deck. This was cut from a thin sheet of wood. I used poplar. The deck was cut as two halves to ensure symmetry. It was then glued to the top of the hull.







                              The front part of the deck has been planked in the photos. The two heavy timbers extending to the stern are the main supports for the wheel assembly.

                              That's all for now,

                              Jeff

                              SDG

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Hi Jeff,your decking looks really nice!

                                I can see your wood working skills paying off with that work.

                                I can also see your next layers taking shape in the background there.

                                You know me when it comes to staying focused.

                                Greg Shinnie

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