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Wooden Ties - Color

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  • Wooden Ties - Color


    What are you doing to color your ties?

    I have used the black I/A wash. What else is there?

    I noticed the I/A does not work well on the Mt. Albert ties. A few years back it did work but on the newer ties it comes out blotchy. I wonder if they changed the type of wood they are using.
    Tom M.

  • #2
    Tom,

    If your ties from Mt Albert were bought in the last 2 or 3 years they had to change the wood used to make the ties. They used to use white sugar pine but it has been increasingly harder to get so he switched to pine and they don't stain the same. I stain my ties with Minwax "Special Walnut" stain.
    Ron Newby

    General Manager

    Clearwater Valley Railway Co.

    http://cvry.ca

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    • #3
      Tom,

      Interesting enough, I just posted this link to a thread above. It may give you some ideas. http://www.finescalerr.com/smf/index.php?topic=1956.0

      8D

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      • #4

        Ron,

        Do you apply the stain after the ties are glued down?

        http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/t...4&whichpage=30
        Tom M.

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        • #5
          Dave,

          Interesting test of the stains.
          Tom M.

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          • #6
            Tom,

            I stain my ties after they are glued down. You could stain them before hand but that is just added work as far as I'm concerned. I know people who have stained them before hand. The method I lay my ties is as follows; 1) glue down the ties and let dry, 2) stain the ties, 3) sand the ties till all the stain is removed from the top of the ties, this insures that there are no bumps and 4) re-stain the top of the ties.
            Ron Newby

            General Manager

            Clearwater Valley Railway Co.

            http://cvry.ca

            Comment


            • #7
              Ron,

              I pre-stain. The rest of your steps are the same as mine.

              I am trying Hunterline Weathering mix (Cordovan brown) on 200 to see what it looks like. They are not dry and the color is not bad.
              Tom M.

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              • #8
                Tom - When I did mine, I use a&i for some and hunterline on the others.

                Back in my other threads, and in some of the new stuff, you can see

                the mix and I like the brown ties better.....not everything has to

                be gray & delapidated.....JMO....

                I pre-stain too, but am willing to try other ways...

                otherwise I do the same as you & Ron

                Comment


                • #9
                  Tie color has varied a lot over the years - I like Minwax Dark Walnut for a creosoted tie that's been installed for a while but is still in good condition. I use Ebony for new ties. Really old ties (30 years or more) are between gray and beige; I haven't worked out how to stain them, but it will have more brown than an untreated tie. If I was modeling an era before ties were routinely creosoted (before WWI), I'd aim for more bleaching than darkening, aside from soot/cinders in cracks & dings.
                  James

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                  • #10
                    I have found that the ties do not accept stain well when new but do after "special treatment" like others have mentioned I glue mine down then sand level. Then I use a very stiff brush and heavily grain. I give 2-3 coats of IA. I used a Mike Chambers formula that had brown/black in it. It gives a nice weathered tie look. Once dry and I'm satisfied with the color I lightly sand the tops just to give a weathered look.

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                    • #11
                      I'm using HunterLine's alcohol stains, and staining the ties and then assembling the track off-line. I separate the ties into 4 piles, each in a small yoghurt container:

                      Container 1: Cover the ties with Light Brown. Swish them around, let the stain soak in a bit. Then remove the ties and place them on a cookie sheet with paper towel, and let dry.

                      Container 2: Cover the ties with Dark Blue Gray. Swish & remove as above

                      Container 3: Cover the ties with Light Gray. Swish & remove as above.

                      Container 4: Pour the remaining Light Brown and Dark Blue Gray stain into this container. If necessary, add Light Gray. Swish & Remove.

                      You can see the variations in tie color here:



                      The PC Board ties are painted with (Liquitex) neutral gray, I want to go back and put a bit of burnt umber brown on them to blend them in more with the actual wood ties.

                      But NOTE: I'm modeling 1890s pre-creosote. You'll want to use darker stains for creosoted ties.

                      dave
                      Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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                      • #12
                        No sure if this shows the true color. When sanded they'll change a bit.


                        Tom M.

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