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  • Bachmann 2-6-0 Bash

    Greetings all. Welcome to my next project. On this one, I will be taking the proverbial hammer to a Bachmann On30 2-6-0. My inspiration for this project is a Brooks Locomotive works Mogul built for the Quincy and Torch Lake Railroad, a copper mining railroad on Michigan’s Upper Penisula. Drawings for this engine were in the Aug. 1985 issue of Railroad Model Craftsman. Pictures and more information on both the engine and the neat railroad can be found here:

    http://www.pasty.com/copperrange/qtl.htm

    The Bachmann engine is a little bit smaller, the wheel base is about 80% of the prototype’s and the drivers are a bit smaller, 39” vs 42” but I think the proportions are similar and, well, I’m not really trying to model this engine, just model a similar one that looks as if it could have been a sister engine built by Brooks for my Iowa coal road.

    The Bachmann engine is a long tried and true good runner. The engine I started with was a basket case I bought at swap meet. Someone had already started something on the engine. It was in pieces and looked like the person had narrowed the frame slightly. There seemed to be an awful lot of slop between the frame and drivers (more than 0.08”). But the price was right (really cheap) and I figured for the price on the engine, if nothing else the wheels and motor would be useful. But I liked the challenge of seeing if I could make anything of this. Any of you that might have read of my previous build would know I’m nuts so…

    My first problem with the engine is that the frame is a more or less solid block of metal. Locomotive frames from this period were much more open with the area between the ashpan and the cylinders being almost airy. Also while the model is based on a prototype that had a long firebox that went to the end of the cab, the Q&TL engine had a shorter firebox (or longer frame) and thus had a more open cab. To represent this I shortened the motor block and the frame leaving about 1/8” of metal behind the gear slot. This cut did obliterate the screw that secures the motor block and frame just behind the gear box. However, there is another screw just ahead of the gear box and there is so much metal here that the chances of there being enough flex to cause problems is pretty remote. To test this before I cut, I removed the rear screw, hooked up power to the motor and while running tried to manually separate the pieces. I wasn’t able to move it with more force that it should ever see, so I feel this won’t be a problem in the future.



    Now to open up the frame. What I’m about to do will seriously weaken the frame. However, I believe the frame will still be far stronger than is needed to support the weight of the engine, keep the wheels and gears in alignment and pull the loads expected. After making these cuts though, one wants to be sure to avoid any hammering on the frame (as in prick punching hole centers for drilling) and to make sure there is direct support when putting force on the frame. If the frame is accidently bent slightly, I found that gently sqeezing it in a vice will bring it back into alignment.

    OK, here goes: I first drilled 1/8” holes through the frame on either side of the axle slots leaving 0.08” of frame material across the top. I then cut out between the holes with a jeweler’s saw. The cut frame was filed smooth, each section being supported in a vice while filing. This is what I ended up with:



    I then made frame overlays from 0.04” styrene. When trying to make two identical pieces like this in brass, the usual method is to cut out two brass blanks, solder them together, cut/file the piece and then heat and separate them. Well, obviously, this isn’t going to work with styrene. What I did was cut out two plastic blanks, clean them very well with denatured alcohol, then stick them together with Scotch double stick tape. I then squared up an edge and end, and laidout and cutout the overlays. When done, I carefully separated them using Goo Gone to cause the tape to release and clean the adhesive. you might notice that some of the lower bars are irregular, unknown to me as I was filing them to shape, they were flexing in the vice, I'll fix this later.



    I epoxied these to the frame block. After they were in alignment, I clamped them and let the epoxy cure for 24 hours. Then I cut the axle slots out, using care to not mar the bearing surfaces.

    Next is to figure out how to collect power from the drivers and hold them on. I have some ideas, time to see if any work. Thanks for stopping by.
    Bill Allen

    Arbor Creek & Middle River Valley Railway

  • #2
    Bill,

    Thanks for sharing this build with us. I look forward to what you will do next. Will you upgrade the motor as well?
    Arthur

    Comment


    • #3
      Arthur,

      At this point, I don't plan on remotoring. I'm not sure simply remotoring without regearing would improve it too much. Unless someone like NWSL makes a regear set for this engine I don't see how I could cut in a new gear box. Now if I could find a gearhead motor that would fit, that might be a whole 'nuther thing.

      You have set me to thinking. Always a dangerous thing. [:-idea]
      Bill Allen

      Arbor Creek & Middle River Valley Railway

      Comment


      • #4
        Bill,

        Bill I will be following along your last engine rebuild was fantastic!

        Comment


        • #5
          Ditto! Oh goodie ... another one that will be fun to watch.
          Cheers,

          Dallas



          Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build

          Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor! []

          Comment


          • #6
            I'll be watching too! You have a way with these steamers.

            -Cody

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm looking forward to see your new work on another loco. The first one was a treat.

              Comment


              • #8
                I can't wait to see more from this bash!!!!
                ______________________

                Carmine * CEO, Engineer, and Janitor * Pacific Belt RR, since 1975!!

                NCE & TCS, w/Keep-Alive ONLY!!

                PBRR Page: http://www.facebook.com/PBrr.N

                Comment


                • #9
                  very interesting story about the Q&TLRR too. Although probably not a direct relative.

                  I hope to bash a 2-6-0 into9 a camelback so will follow your work on this for ideas.

                  8D

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    ..........
                    Bill Allen

                    Arbor Creek & Middle River Valley Railway

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Very nice work.
                      Peter (swissrails)



                      http://www.randomrailroad.blogspot.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Lookin' good! I think the airy look of the frame makes a big difference. Looking forward to more!

                        -Cody

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          As a Yooper who's been forced to live "below Da Bridge" (Downstate Michigan), I'll be watching this. Right after I fix myself a Pasty.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Greetings all. Thank you so much for your kind words and encouragement. I’m glad that others find this interesting and useful.

                            Arthur, I traded emails with Dave R. at NWSL and he suggests a new motor (item #2032D-9) that might help the performance of the engine. The motor has a lower starting voltage and high torque. It’s a little bit smaller than the stock motor which is all to the good as far as I’m concerned. I’m thinking about it.

                            To the misplaced Yooper, I hope you enjoy your pasty. My wife was born in Whitehall, MI near Muskegon. Beautiful country there. I hope to visit the U P someday.

                            Last night I finished the mold for corner braces for the tender frame. I was a little worried as the rubber was past it’s sell by date but it seemed to have worked. I tried casting one, but got a little too impatient and tried to de-mold before it was completely hardened. I think the room might have been a little too cool for resin casting. We keep the thermostat down to save propane. I think I’ll try doing this in the kitchen as it’s warmer there. All in all I’m pleased though.

                            The master and mold:



                            And the first try:



                            Thanks for stopping by.
                            Bill Allen

                            Arbor Creek & Middle River Valley Railway

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Bill,

                              Your work is top notch. I am following eagerly and especially in regard to the motor. I hate the stock motor- especially when you have those big driver wheels; the mogul acts like a jumpy drag racer.
                              Arthur

                              Comment

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