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  • Advice for New Club Seeking Location

    Hello, All...

    A local shop has put together a list of quite a number of people interested in starting a club. Problem is location space. Do you have any advice for us as we seek a place to house our club?

    Ideas we've tossed around so far are local schools, churches, and park districts. With today's lousy economy, several strip mall-types have been willing to talk about a rental agreement, but they're not willing to go more than six months at a time in the event a lease customer comes along.

    Thanks in advance for any suggestions you may have.

    Dave K.
    "Promote what you love instead of bashing what you hate."

  • #2
    Start modular, that way you don't necescarily need a permanent home. Then, when one becomes availible, if yall want, you have the beginings of your layout already.

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    • #3
      I second the idea of a modular group. It will get some of the bugs of the group worked out. We have a group that sets up 4-6 times a year and gets together at least once a month. You will find out who is serious about a group/club and who is not.

      John
      Sitting along side the orignal Central Pacific Rail Road.



      Home of The Great On30 Barn Meet, that will be held May 16th 2015

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      • #4
        I like the idea of a modular format. The gentleman interested in starting the club obtained a layout (only benchwork and some trackwork completed)from a woman whose husband passed away. Thanks for the ideas...I'm printing them all out for use the next time we chat.

        Dave K.
        "Promote what you love instead of bashing what you hate."

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        • #5
          Dave, . .For just starting out, a modular layout seems to be the most practical way to go. Along the way, you will be able to build and operate as you continue your quest for a permanent place to call home. The plus about this is that you are able to operate at meets and shows. Our club has been meeting in the basement of a community hall for more than 25 years. About 9 years ago, the club decided to demolish our existing layout, expand by hand-excavation, and begin building a new layout.

          quote:


          Originally posted by kruisyk


          I like the idea of a modular format. The gentleman interested in starting the club obtained a layout (only benchwork and some trackwork completed)from a woman whose husband passed away. Thanks for the ideas...I'm printing them all out for use the next time we chat.

          Dave K.


          <font size="4"><font face="Comic Sans MS"><font color="blue">Allen</font id="blue"></font id="Comic Sans MS"></font id="size4"> []<br /><br><b><font face="Comic Sans MS"><font size="3"><i>Modeling the East in the West on the <font color="green">Northeastern</font id="green"> <font color="blue">Pacific RIM</font id="blue">, <font color="green">Oregon</font id="green">, that is!</i></font id="size3"></font id="Comic Sans MS"></b>

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          • #6
            Thanks much, Allen.

            Dave K.
            "Promote what you love instead of bashing what you hate."

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            • #7
              Two of our north Jersey clubs have found homes in buildings on county park lands. As such they usually agree to open their layouts to the public a few times a month.
              Bruce

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              • #8
                Thanks, Bruce. Good idea to add to the list.

                DK
                "Promote what you love instead of bashing what you hate."

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                • #9
                  Along the idea of modular, consider building your club layout in sections. Its similar to modular but a custom design. This way, you can start off small, working in one of the members garages or basements until a spot opens up someplace. In the interim, you can take your sections to train shows and show them off.

                  In the meantime, set up the club, pay dues, save some money and see what happens over time. Building one section at a time allows you to focus on scenes, work on structures, etc. The end result will be highly detailed sections ready to go when a space becomes available.
                  Mark

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                  • #10
                    Thank you for the input, Mark.

                    Dave K.
                    "Promote what you love instead of bashing what you hate."

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      For a new club, finding a long-term leased space is going to be tough. Most landlords will want a personal guarantee from one or more of the founders before they'll go multi-year. If you can get up and running with modules (whether you go with Free-Mo, NMRA or whatever), you can see how the group holds together for a while, and maybe earn a bit of money from show promoters while you're at it. Many towns, churches etc. will let you have a set-up/work night in their hall for little or no money, as long as the space is clean the next morning.
                      James

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                      • #12
                        Thank you, James.

                        DK
                        "Promote what you love instead of bashing what you hate."

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                        • #13
                          Fair warning. I belonged to a club that was allowed to build our layout in some old offices that were no longer in use. All we had to do was clean them up. It lasted for a few years until the owner decided to reclaim the rooms and kicked the club out. Since we weren't paying any rent, the outcome wasn't totally unexpected, but the loss of many hours of dedicated work that went to the dumpster hurt.

                          If I were to recommend anything, go modular so you can pick up and leave.
                          Russ

                          It's not Practice makes Perfect, It's Perfect Practice makes Perfect

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                          • #14
                            Dave, a recent episode of the Model Railway Show had an interesting bit on a club that's had to move several times and may be of interest to you. http://themodelrailwayshow.com/ShowNotes/?p=593

                            Jeff

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                            • #15
                              Thanks, Jeff! I'll check it out.

                              Dave K.
                              "Promote what you love instead of bashing what you hate."

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