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  • Mark,
    Great ducting job! I also like those realistic 22.5 degree angles.
    Nice catch on the subroof.

    Scott

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    • Mark, Nice, precise ductwork & subroof.

      Comment


      • Mark

        Great modeling! The duct work looks very realistic. Getting that tape on there straight must have been a fun job. I find getting my hands do do what my eyeballs want to be a little more difficult than it once was. Keep up the great work.

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        • Great ducting job! I also like those realistic 22.5 degree angles.
          Nice catch on the subroof.
          Thanks, Scott.

          I can see the 22.5 degree angles are a great success. Yes - it would have been difficult to affix my flashings to those two protrusions with a gap in the subroof like that!

          Cheers, Mark.

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          • Mark, Nice, precise ductwork & subroof.
            Thanks, Bill.

            That subroof had me thinking about math from decades ago... My wife is a math teacher - so I could have asked for assistance, but I like to save that for computer stuff! Besides, my practical application of this sort of logic isn't too bad...

            Cheers, Mark.

            Comment


            • Great modeling! The duct work looks very realistic. Getting that tape on there straight must have been a fun job. I find getting my hands do do what my eyeballs want to be a little more difficult than it once was. Keep up the great work.
              Thanks, John.

              I often employ the use of my very expensive and accurate tool - the eyeometer1969! You no doubt have one in your tool collection, all be it a different year of production. Yes - I have a fantastic habit of spontaneously juggling or throwing very fragile objects. Years of practice at this and the default decision to 'just let it fall to the floor' is finally starting to kick in!

              The weather has been much warmer over the last couple of days. Its a catch 22 though, great weather for getting back into the barn and tackling some more benchwork is also great weather to get back to all that paving for the formal rose garden - and I do enjoy a well needed fix of vitamin D from the sun.

              Cheers, Mark.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by mark_dalrymple View Post

                Thanks, John.

                I often employ the use of my very expensive and accurate tool - the eyeometer1969! You no doubt have one in your tool collection, all be it a different year of production. Yes - I have a fantastic habit of spontaneously juggling or throwing very fragile objects. Years of practice at this and the default decision to 'just let it fall to the floor' is finally starting to kick in!

                The weather has been much warmer over the last couple of days. Its a catch 22 though, great weather for getting back into the barn and tackling some more benchwork is also great weather to get back to all that paving for the formal rose garden - and I do enjoy a well needed fix of vitamin D from the sun.

                Cheers, Mark.
                Mark

                My tool collection does have a eyemeter1958. A bit older version than yours. Great tool but very high maintenance.

                I struggle with getting enough modeling time all summer here. Lots of outside activities and chores to keep me busy.

                Cheers,

                John

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                • Hi guys.

                  Well - I got a bit more benchwork done over the weekend. On Saturday I got the curved front bottom plate and the straight back plate glued and nailed to the 3mm MDF. The position of all the fins has to be worked out to line up with the studs and then carefully marked. I then flip the ceiling and mark the underside for nailing. I then cut all the 4.5mm MDF fins cut and checked out for the front and back plates. The 45x19mm front jack studs have to be ripped to the right angle for the curve (every angle is slightly different, so this takes some time). I then screw and glue the jack stud to the 45x19mm rafter. Once this is done the fins are then carefully glued and nailed to the 45x19mm dressed pine. I then line all the fins up and drill and screw two screws through from the back 45x19mm plate (which is on its edge). I then stand the assembly on its edge and drill and screw through the front plate into all the jack studs. Each fin now has three screws in it to keep it lined up. I then undo all the screws, take all the fins off and add glue. I then work quickly to reassemble. The pre drilled and screwed holes make sure this is as quick and easy as possible. The assembly is then flipped upside down and 19mm brads are added to the pre marked positions. I then flip the assembly back the other way and lay the top plate underneath nicely lined up. I use my small adjustable square to mark the position of the jack studs on this top plate. I then glued and screwed this into position on top.

                  Photo 1&2 - show the assembly at 5pm on Saturday.
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                  Today was a little bit more of a broken day, but I still got what I was hoping done. I started off by adding the last of the dwangs (remember those?) for the backdrop. I then cut some 3mm MDF to size and glued and nailed this into position. I bought a whole lot of 600mmx2200mm sheets for $1 each, so I'm using these when I can. When you see a horizontal join on the backdrop its because I think the scenery will be above this join on the completed scene. I then made up a scaffolding from 45x19mm pine and lifted my assembly into position. Again, I spent a bit of time lining the ceiling seam up and getting the back of the ceiling down hard on the backdrop. I drilled and screwed as I went. Once this was done I again undid everything and slid the assembly aside before adding glue. The assembly was then reinstated and re screwed. Things lined up pretty nicely on this one,

                  Photos 3-6 - show the assembly in position. The scaffolding will, of course, be removed, but I will first need to add a few hanging supports from the ceiling.
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                  More soon, Cheers, Mark.

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                  • Stopping by to see the wonderful wood work. I am curious though about the elaborate ceiling you are building. Why? (I may have missed the reason if it was posted. I haven't read every single post.)

                    Bernd
                    New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

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                    • Mark,

                      Your construction is, like, museum quality. The methods you are using are terrific.

                      Mike
                      _________________________________________________

                      Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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                      • Mark,
                        I agree with Mike, excellent benchwork, nice and precise!
                        It is helpful to get an overall view as well, very impressive.

                        Scott

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                        • I'm joining the others, beautiful woodwork, Mark.

                          George
                          Flying is the 2nd greatest thrill known to man. Landing is the first.

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                          • Stopping by to see the wonderful wood work. I am curious though about the elaborate ceiling you are building. Why? (I may have missed the reason if it was posted. I haven't read every single post.)
                            Thanks, Bernd.

                            There are several answers to your question.

                            Earthquakes - Christchurch suffered from several earthquakes last decade. The worst of these was in Feb 2011, and claimed almost 200 lives (in a country with pretty high building codes). At the time we lived on the hill and the quake and hundreds of large aftershocks which persisted for years felt like a giant was using a jack hammer next door. My layout was set up in the garage in an L-shape. Half of the L was on legs and attached to the wall which was used as the backdrop and lighting was in the ceiling above. The other half was on wheels with a built in self contained backdrop and ceiling. There was considerable damage to the half attached to the wall with great tears in the backdrop and damaged structures below. The half on wheels suffered very little damage.

                            Portability - Of course the other thing our earthquakes taught us is that even when you think you will be living in a house for decades to come, you never know when this may change. After a long winded fight with our insurance company we eventually moved, but even if we had have stayed we would have had to move everything out of our house and put it into storage for about a year while the repairs were done and gone into temporary accommodation. So, along with making my layout with self-contained backdrops and ceilings and on wheels, it is also sectional. This means it can be relocated either temporary or permanently if needed.

                            High ceilings - My layout room here in the barn has 3.4m (11' 8") ceilings. The self contained ceilings with pelmets means I can put my lighting nice and close to the layout. This also helps make the scene more intimate and helps block out 1:1 scale 'noise'.

                            A possible future - If, by the time I die, I have created a layout worth preserving, then all one would need is a 10mx5.9' room. Its nice to think that that might happen one day, rather than the layout having to be torn down and a few structures saved (which is usually the case).

                            Enjoyment - I like a challenge and I enjoy woodwork. It also goes fairly quickly. I have achieved all the new benchwork working spasmodically over about 6 months, as well as working on some structures. For me that is a good amount of progress.

                            Cheers, Mark.

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                            • Your construction is, like, museum quality. The methods you are using are terrific.
                              Thanks you very much, Mike.

                              It was a good weekend of progress. It was actually our annual Trainz weekend, but I chose to stay home and dedicate as much time as I could on my layout benchwork instead.

                              Cheers, Mark.

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                              • I agree with Mike, excellent benchwork, nice and precise!
                                It is helpful to get an overall view as well, very impressive.
                                Thanks, Scott.

                                That old mantra "we can never have too many pictures" always seems to float around in my head at times like these - so I just uploaded all the ones I had took. Its getting harder and harder to get back far enough to get overall photos now.

                                Cheers, Mark.

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