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  • Mark, your mill & roof look fabulous! That is one impressive looking structure, made even better by your attention to details.
    Thank you for your kind works, Greg.

    There is still a long way to go. I still have the upper barn to build, and then there is the poppet head. That will be a large build in its own right. I plan to build it without a cover so you can see all the timberwork. I have borrowed a few books off a friend on mining in New Zealand and there are a few photos to inspire...

    Cheers, Mark.

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    • That is a lot of roofing - It looks great Mark.

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      • I've been wondering how you were coming along on this model, not realizing you were alternating work on this and your benchwork.

        The roof looks terrific, especially with the nail detail.
        Thanks, Mike. I do think the simulated lead head nails are worth the extra effort. The ridge capping is quite fiddly, too, but again I think adds some prototypical flavour to the build. I'm not a fan of bent iron as a ridge capping - especially when the iron is running the same way as the rest of the roof. If you'd ever tried to bend a real sheet of corrugated iron that way you wouldn't model it.

        When omicron went rife in our community Neil and I decided to have a break from our Thursday afternoon modeling sessions and hide from the world. I took the opportunity to get stuck in to some serious benchwork. Now that we are back to our Thursday sessions again I'm juggling the benchwork with the flotation mill. That only gives me around 2 1/2 hours on the mill a week - so progress is slow. However, the roof is something I would rather not work on for longer periods, so it works fine.

        Cheers, Mark.

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        • Holy Cow was my first thought. That is impressive roof work. Very realistic!
          By the way, glad you saved those lovely curves.
          Thanks so much, Scott.

          I have done a blow by blow how to on my roofing technique somewhere - no doubt within this thread. I'll have a hunt and add a link. Its not really difficult, just fiddly and time consuming. I don't usually do quite so much iron on a roof - but felt this one really needed it. I bought myself 10 more packs of Campbells corrugated iron recently, as my supplies were quickly diminishing! There will be a lot of corrugated iron roofs in Inglletown - the peninsula of Tellynott based on Wellington suburbs. Wrinkly tin was king here for roofing - still is really. Just a little reminder here - Inglletown is a anagram of wellington and Tellynott of Lyttelton. I have taken a lot of inspiration from both these New Zealand cities.

          Yes - I'm pleased with the overall aesthetics of the layout shape. I certainly feel I made the right decision. I'm hoping to get a bit more done out in the barn over the weekend.

          Thanks for following along and taking the time to comment, cheers, Mark.

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          • Nice start on the roofing. Mark. It looks like you have a lot of cutting and fitting ahead of you on the rest of the roof.
            Thanks, George.

            No - it doesn't really get any easier as I progress! There will also be a number of flashings to do against the gable walls and where the roof is stepped. And you've just reminded me of the dormer window! B###er! I've pre cut and painted the side walls and all... Oh well - a nice problem to overcome next Thursday! Of course then there are all the rafter tails and fly rafters to add... All good fun!

            Cheers, Mark.

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            • That is a lot of roofing - It looks great Mark.
              Thanks, John.

              Bringing back any memories? O. V. Hooker and sons, maybe?

              Thanks for checking in on my progress, cheers, Mark.

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              • Mark,

                I missed where you explained the origin of your place names. Or did I forget? I have long figured that Tellynott was an anagram (my mind works that way) and now know that Inglletown is also. Despite the TV shows from New Zealand that we watch I'm still not very good with place names and did not recognize the origins. But I had my suspicions . . .

                Mike
                _________________________________________________

                Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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                • Mark,
                  Found your thread on this forum by following that link you mentioned on the other forum to get here...looks like 68 pages are to be reviewed...so glad to see your modeling again.
                  Tommy

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                  • Originally posted by mark_dalrymple View Post

                    Thanks, John.

                    Bringing back any memories? O. V. Hooker and sons, maybe?

                    Thanks for checking in on my progress, cheers, Mark.
                    It sure does - I will not soon forget that roof.

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                    • Hi guys.

                      Since Mike alluded to the origins of my place names...

                      I missed where you explained the origin of your place names. Or did I forget? I have long figured that Tellynott was an anagram (my mind works that way) and now know that Inglletown is also. Despite the TV shows from New Zealand that we watch I'm still not very good with place names and did not recognize the origins. But I had my suspicions . . .
                      ...I went back through this thread to give a page reference for my spiels on Lyttelton and Wellington - but couldn't find it. Perhaps I only posted it over at the modelers forum? Anyway - here it is...

                      Lyttelton is a steep port town (now a suburb of Christchurch) about 20 minutes drive from the center of the city. A single track mainline negotiates these hills via a rail tunnel 1.5 miles long. The tunnel was completed in 1867, and at the time, was one of the longest tunnels in the world, and the first to be driven through the side of an extinct volcano. A ferry service was introduced from Lyttelton to Wellington in 1895 (connecting the South Island to the North Island) and continued until 1976. This gave rise to the introduction of the boat train, which soon became a twice daily service. Passengers were picked up from Lyttelton wharf in the morning after their overnight sailing from Wellington and taken through the tunnel to Christchurch, while in the evening passengers bound for Wellington were dropped off. A road tunnel was also constructed, but not until 1964. For years rail was the primary source of transport for goods from the mainland to the port. Lyttelton became a popular destination for picnics and fishing off the wharf and in its hay day, 23 passenger trains traveled the 6.25-mile journey between Christchurch and Lyttelton daily.

                      The name Tellynott is an anagram of Lyttleton, and the port of Lyttelton has certainly been a major influence on the design of the Tellynott section of my layout. The steep site and small area demand complex and tight track-work in order to service as many wharves and industries as possible. This has also led to a large variety of industries in a very small space. Likewise, extremely small building sites have led to the structures being squeezed in, and the tendency to spread vertically rather than horizontally. I have exaggerated this vertical element and have looked to other New Zealand towns and cities for appropriate prototype buildings to either kit-bash or scratch-build.

                      As Maori legend tells it, Wellington is the head of the great fish that Maui hooked and hauled from the sea (the North Island representing the fish, while the South Island is the canoe). She is a city of character and beauty, who grew over the decades, spreading up the Hutt river valley, around the shores of Cook Strait, and along the harbours and bays to the North.

                      I first fell in love with photographs of fantastic wharf scenes of the early 1900's - photos bustling with life, with pretty ships and Clydesdale horses and the wondrous shapes of a row of hydraulic cranes. Smoke and fog intermingled and clouded the sea air, but somehow through all that grime and grit I saw a romantic notion of life. I visited Christchurch's many libraries and checked out many books on the city and also purchased any good ones I found in second hand book shops, especially when visiting Wellington. I developed a shortlist of buildings I hoped to build one day, and many on that list were from Wellington. On one trip a few years ago I found a book entitled 'The Compleat Cityscapes' written David McGill and illustrated by Grant Tilly. It featured 244 heritage sketches of Wellington structures , many of them residential houses, and many located in some of Wellington's steepest suburbs. It was one of those finds that I was so super excited by. When we moved to our new house with the extra modelling space the idea came to me to build an entire peninsula devoted to residential housing, using The Compleat Cityscapes almost solely as my inspiration. As the idea developed I decided to keep this area free from any visible railway. This peninsula will be called Inglletown, and anagram of Wellington.

                      Cheers, Mark.

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                      • Found your thread on this forum by following that link you mentioned on the other forum to get here...looks like 68 pages are to be reviewed...so glad to see your modeling again.
                        Great to have you along for the ride, Tommy and I hope you find a new home here. You will find a fair amount of cutting and pasting between the two forums, especially in recent times when the end of the modelers forum felt imminent.

                        Cheers, Mark.

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                        • Looks great Mark. Glad I won't have to lose track of one of my favorite builders. Good to see a familiar "face".

                          John

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                          • Mark,
                            Thanks for the name backgrounds and history, very enjoyable.

                            Thanks to Mike for asking.

                            Scott

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                            • Looks great Mark. Glad I won't have to lose track of one of my favorite builders. Good to see a familiar "face".
                              Thanks very much, John.

                              I'm glad you found it ok. I jump around a bit in topic from time to time, but I find if I strive for perfection in trying to get my layout 'story' right, I get too scared to post. Best just to use a blunt tool and slap it on, and chisel away to expose the finer points down the track...

                              Cheers, Mark.

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                              • Thanks for the name backgrounds and history, very enjoyable.

                                Thanks to Mike for asking.
                                You are most welcome, Scott.

                                Now that the modelers forum is no more I will have to go through my build thread from there and see what I posted there that I have missed here. I might also do a map of New Zealand with flags showing the origins of some of my kitbashes and scratchbuilds.

                                Cheers, Mark.

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