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  • Mark,

    Seems like money well spent and worth every penny for the enjoyment you’re receiving.

    I have to say I don’t remember seeing a layout on wheels as you have built, but it makes perfect sense.
    Thanks, Mike.

    I hope I never have to test my earthquake theory. I've had enough of those for a lifetime! Although we have to remember the main alpine fault line is overdue for a big one - and that could be an 8.2. It will certainly make relocation easier - hopefully I'll never have to test that theory. either! Of course the main benefit is that when it does move it is complete. Typically backdrops are attached to the wall of the building they're in, or are part of the building they're in, and ceilings likewise. With these modules they just get unbolted, moved, and bolted back together again. Things will obviously get more complicated as the scenery is added - but how many layouts just get ripped to pieces because moving them is just too hard, if not impossible?

    I'm certainly enjoying the building of it. The modelling weekend in July has given me a completion date to aim for - we'll have to see if I make it...

    Cheers, Mark.

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    • Mark,
      Some really nice construction going on there! Love the mitred diagonals.

      Scott

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      • Some really nice construction going on there! Love the mitred diagonals.
        Thanks so much, Scott.

        Actually - where the braces meet the front legs on the angled L-girder - we have compound mitred diagonals! It was good to push my new sliding compound mitre saw to its full capabilities - the only other time I've done compound mitres with it was a couple of practice cuts. Its only a small drop saw and only 'compounds' in one direction, so you have to have your work around the right way. It was a decent price, though. I'm getting better at buying only what I need, but keeping the quality to a reasonable level. I put a better quality blade in it before I made my first cut. So far I have been very happy with it.

        Update coming soon, cheers, Mark.

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        • Hi guys.

          I've been pretty busy with outside stuff. Upper body pretty sore after hiring out a turf cutter yesterday! It was a beast of a thing with absolutely no turning (and I needed to make lots of turns!)

          Anyway - thought I would upload a couple of shots. Firstly - here is a shot of my feet on top of my step ladder. You should see my gumboot socks - they're quite impressive. I laid my 2.5mm MDF sheets along the two modules and used different radii that I had drawn on brown paper to design the layout shape, consulting my plan and model as I went. I also measured across from my existing benchwork to make sure I didn't encroach on my minimum 700m (28") isle width. I'd got myself a nice flowing curve that achieved all this, but at the point where the track is I had a spare 50mm (2"), and was trying to work out whether I could make this scene work or whether it was worth trying to redo my curve before cutting all the joists to length. The middle track here is the high track, and the straight section will be on a large viaduct. The curved track at back against the wall will be a few inches higher than the front track.
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          Photo 2 - and here we are a while later. I decided that the curve was just too nice, and gaining 50mm more over a very small area was likely to diminish its appearance, never mind all the extra work. This area is also directly across from the flotation mill, and I figured a little extra isle width here couldn't be a bad thing. You can see the relevant section of my model of a model in front of the blue straight edge.
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          More soon, cheers, Mark.

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          • Mark

            Your benchwork looks great and I hope you never have to test the earthquake design feature. There are times when I wish I would have mounted my layout on wheels. I did design in a method to move my newest section - just in case.

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            • More impressiveness....
              A model of a model, a great line, something in my mind for many years and recently re-ignighted.
              Great and inspirational progress again Mark.
              Last edited by UKGuy; 05-25-2022, 08:26 PM.

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              • Your benchwork looks great and I hope you never have to test the earthquake design feature. There are times when I wish I would have mounted my layout on wheels. I did design in a method to move my newest section - just in case.
                Thanks, John.

                No - I hope I don't have to test my earthquake design feature, too!. There are a lot of features about this design I like - and I enjoy the work, so I guess its a win, win.

                Cheers, Mark.

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                • More impressiveness....
                  A model of a model, a great line, something in my mind for many years and recently re-ignighted.
                  Great and inspirational progress again Mark.
                  Thanks, Karl!

                  So what was reignighted? A model of a model, or great lines? Always great to hear from you.

                  Cheers, Mark.

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                  • Hi guys.

                    Well, I've been plodding away at the corrugated roofing on my flotation mill over the last three Thursday afternoons. It's fiddly and time consuming work. As you know, I like to simulate lead headed nails in my roofing and cut all the pieces to prototypical size. I also try to vary the lengths of the sheets slightly, while keeping the lead headed nails lined up. Anyway - today I managed to get some ridge capping on so thought I would upload some photos of progress. The ridge capping is made from tin foil attached to double sided tape and melded around a piece of plastic rod. The first shot was taken last Thursday. Today I added some CA to some of the smaller sheets to hold in position, added some more iron to the back side and added the ridge capping. I use a toothpick to meld the double sided tape attached to the tin foil into the undulations of the corrugated iron.
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                    More soon, cheers, Mark.

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                    • Mark, that's some very precise and neat work on that roof.
                      Follow along as my dog and I travel the country in our van.
                      FaceBook link: https://www.facebook.com/A-Dog-A-Van-and-A-View-108345371976229

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                      • Mark, your mill & roof look fabulous! That is one impressive looking structure, made even better by your attention to details.

                        Greg

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                        • Mark,

                          I've been wondering how you were coming along on this model, not realizing you were alternating work on this and your benchwork.

                          The roof looks terrific, especially with the nail detail.

                          Mike
                          _________________________________________________

                          Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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                          • Mark,
                            Holy Cow was my first thought. That is impressive roof work. Very realistic!
                            By the way, glad you saved those lovely curves.

                            Scott

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                            • Nice start on the roofing. Mark. It looks like you have a lot of cutting and fitting ahead of you on the rest of the roof.

                              George
                              Flying is the 2nd greatest thrill known to man. Landing is the first.

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                              • Mark, that's some very precise and neat work on that roof.
                                Thanks very much, Rick.

                                On a roof of this size and complexity it helps to work on it a little bit at a time.

                                Cheers, Mark.

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