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Tellynott corner module

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  • Hi guys.

    Next I cut strips of 3mm MDF about 50mm wide. These I cut to fit between the studs and then glued and clamped them into position around the curve and the straight to the right of the curve to create a backing for the splice of the two sheets of 3mm MDF. I cut another (slightly smaller than) half sheet of 3mm MDF to length and then eased this into the curve and glued it in place. I added 19mm flathead nails to this where necessary to hold it in position while the glue dried. The scenery should end up above the splice, but it gives me something to build against.
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    I then got out the electric planner and straightened the back wall of Tellynott in preparation for the backdrop. The backdrop will step back 45mm at the splice of the two modules. I didn't see any way around this. I figured I needed a minimum of 45mm to create and hold the curved wall, but if I continued the wall like this it would add 55mm of thickness (including the 10mm Clarence) to the backdrop (rather than 3mm). This meant the layout width would be reduced by this amount and my two mines would no longer have enough room. As I am determined not to deduct from the layout width next to be built along the back wall, and don't want to reduce my aisle width, I saw the 55mm quirk as my only option. I intend to have the scenery behind the top track extend all the way to the ceiling here, and so the quirk will not be seen. After straightening I cut a small access hole behind the flotation mine, and then build the rest of the straight wall along to the module join at the threshold between the two rooms.
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    Finally, I used a hand saw to cut the plywood back to the opening stud at left and back to the batten along the head. I marked the position of the dummy wall to be built in front of the roller door, transferred this to the plywood, and used my skill saw to cut this back, finishing top and bottom with a hand saw. I added a new drive pin to the bottom plate before cutting the excess bottom plate off. The step from the back wall to the dummy wall is now reduced to around 175mm.
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    Sorry there has not been a lot of 'dramatic' changes this post - but it was nice to get some of these annoying little jobs out of the way.

    More soon, cheers, Mark.

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    • God bless you Mark! I wore out just looking at the photos and imagining the work involved in building your railroad! Nice job and great planning!
      Dave
      Dave

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      • Mark,
        I agree with the others, wow! An impressive amount of structural work, indeed.

        Scott

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        • God bless you Mark! I wore out just looking at the photos and imagining the work involved in building your railroad! Nice job and great planning!
          Thanks very much, Dave!

          I'm pleased to have worn you out - now I know why I sometimes feel so tired when I come in from the barn and haft past eleven! I'm still itching to get into the barn whenever I can - which is a good sign. Of course, I still have to earn my keep, so there is plenty of other stuff to eat up my time! My plan it to work backwards from the corner module for a while and get the ceiling and walls completed back to the threshold.

          Cheers, Mark.

          Comment


          • I agree with the others, wow! An impressive amount of structural work, indeed.
            Thanks, Scott!

            It was actually - at least in hind sight - a lot of fun lifting that corner section into place with some of my modelling buddies. There was time for a bit of a snoop around in Tellynott - which several of them had not seen before, and the 3-D model is a great aid to explaining where Shadowlands is heading.

            Cheers, Mark.

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            • Mark

              Great work on the module move - first class Engineering along with construction skills. I can't wait until you have some completed sections to show. I close my eyes and visualize that beautiful benchwork with structures and scenery.

              I have been watching your posts but I could not respond because I was traveling light with just my iPad and didn't have the password to sign in and post. My wife and I flew out to California for a visit with my oldest daughter, her husband, and my youngest grandson who just had his first birthday. Great trip but it's time to get back to some modeling.

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              • just excellent work. A very fine foundation
                It's only make-believe

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                • Great work on the module move - first class Engineering along with construction skills. I can't wait until you have some completed sections to show. I close my eyes and visualize that beautiful benchwork with structures and scenery.

                  I have been watching your posts but I could not respond because I was traveling light with just my iPad and didn't have the password to sign in and post. My wife and I flew out to California for a visit with my oldest daughter, her husband, and my youngest grandson who just had his first birthday. Great trip but it's time to get back to some modeling.
                  Thanks very much, John.

                  It will be fun doing some mountain scenery. I'm hoping it goes a bit faster than the structure building. Having said that - I remember a nice beech tree taking around 10 hours to construct. It will be nice to find some good techniques for some rimu, Totara, kahikatea, matai and miro. I have a friend who is 3-D printing trees. I'm hoping to get an example of each sort in the future as an example to emulate. we will see...

                  Great to hear you having time away with the family. I spent a week in California back in 1988. One of my most important purchases took place there - Model railroading with John Allan. I was travelling with my mum and on a whim we caught the train to San Francisco. We got a wonderful taxi driver who gave us a great tour of the city, caught a tram down to pier 39, and spent the night in the bus depot with the street people. We felt quite safe and I remember a man singing Nat King Cole songs all night long. It was a great time with mum, and a treasured memory now that she has gone.

                  Cheers, Mark.

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                  • just excellent work. A very fine foundation
                    Thanks, Bob.

                    I must admit, I enjoy walking into the barn and looking at how much I've achieved over the last couple of months. Benchwork sure does go quicker then structure building!

                    Cheers, Mark.

                    Comment


                    • Hi guys.

                      So here is a photo of the lift in action - just as the piece had been lowered into position. This was when my photographer turned up. You can see the step ladder has replaced the broken saw horse. Notice the safety footwear. Actually, both builders wore jandles for the occasion. I'm in the centre in the high vis T-shirt.Click image for larger version

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                      And here is the ceiling for the long skinny section above Freda mine taking shape. I'm showing off some of my clamp collection here.
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                      More soon, cheers, Mark.
                      Attached Files

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                      • Mark,
                        Are the Wellies considered safety footwear?

                        Scott

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                        • Are the Wellies considered safety footwear?
                          Hi Scott.

                          Mine aren't, I must admit - but you can get safety gumboots. They come with steel capped toes.

                          Cheers, Mark.

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                          • Hi guys.

                            Just time for a quick update. I've been busy with outside stuff - getting ready for a nice winter project in the garden. Today was raining, so I took the opportunity to get a bit more done on Shadowlands.

                            The two photos below show the next module ceiling. Photo 1 is a dry fit to check things all lined up (they did).
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                            Photo 2 - The ceiling was lifted out, glue applied, and lifted back in. The 4.75mm MDF rafters have been screwed to the studs used in the Tellynott backdrop. I also ran a 45x19mm piece of ribbon board along the back of the ceiling (which the 3mm ceiling piece was glued and nailed to) and screwed this to the studs as well. I was able to lift this section in by myself. The stud with cap and rag on top is temporary.
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                            More soon, cheers, Mark.

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                            • Mark

                              Your benchwork is really looking good. My spring time chores are getting in the way of my modeling these days, too.

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                              • Mark,

                                You’re really on a roll. Looks like you’ve accomplished a lot and your workmanship is excellent.

                                Mike
                                _________________________________________________

                                Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

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