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  • Mark,

    My mat cutter is simply a hand-held tool that secures a blade at 45 degrees. To use it I run it along a straightedge. The cutter doesn't quite cut all the way through the cork, but that's no problem. I clamp the cork between the straightedge and a board.

    Yes, I'm cutting half-width strips. They generally come out even.

    Mike
    _________________________________________________

    Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

    Comment


    • Hi guys.

      Thanks for that, Mike - much appreciated.

      Well a little more progress.

      Photo 1 - I have outlined the modules shape. You can see the front of the layout curve in place, glued and screwed, and the back piece temporarily screwed in position. This piece will actually be used as the top of the backdrop but I have it in position to mark both the joists and the position of the studs on the wall top plate as well as to define the modules shape. I have the lower trackbed screwed in position - still descending from right to left, while the high track is shown by the three very tall raisers. This is the point at which it reaches its maximum height of 1550mm (61"). I also have the front jack stud attached to the previous module (right bottom of photo).
      Click image for larger version

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      More soon, cheers, Mark.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by mark_dalrymple View Post

        Thanks for your engineering background input, John.

        I bought a good amount of 90x19 a year or so back in preparation for this project and fillet stacked it with fillets both vertically and horizontally and three strops holding it all together and straight. Of course I have since run out and bought more, although I have kept the straightest pieces aside for making up my L-girder for the long module still to do in stage 2. Drying out over the seasons indoors like this should minimise the timber movement. I'm keen on overkill, myself. Besides, I splashed out and bought a nice little sliding compound mitre saw, so its nice to have some mitres to cut.

        PS - we use the Queens English here in NZ - so although my spelling isn't great, all those words like mitre and colour and minimise are deliberate.

        Cheers, Mark.
        Mark

        If you have any issues it will be with the curved pieces - wood does weird things when you cut at different angles across the grain. When in doubt add another brace on the curves. I had a curve pop up 1/16th of an inch this winter - actually twist would be more accurate. It had been in place for 20 years with no issues. I removed the track from the area braced it down and then made it "perfect" again with the belt sander. Adding braces underneath the layout with the scenery in place is not as easy as it was 20 years ago.

        PS - when you spell like I do you don't notice the difference.

        Comment


        • Mark,

          Sorry about the earthquake, but it is interesting hearing about how you are trying to "earthquake proof" your layout. That last module is somewhat reminding me of a roller coaster.
          I mean that in a positive way.

          Scott

          Comment


          • If you have any issues it will be with the curved pieces - wood does weird things when you cut at different angles across the grain. When in doubt add another brace on the curves. I had a curve pop up 1/16th of an inch this winter - actually twist would be more accurate. It had been in place for 20 years with no issues. I removed the track from the area braced it down and then made it "perfect" again with the belt sander. Adding braces underneath the layout with the scenery in place is not as easy as it was 20 years ago.
            John - all my curves are cut from MDF. That means there is no grain. It doesn't mean there will be no problems moving forwards.

            PS - when you spell like I do you don't notice the difference.
            I hear you! Sometimes I struggle to get my spelling good enough on a word so that my spell check recognises it!

            Cheers, Mark.

            Comment


            • Sorry about the earthquake, but it is interesting hearing about how you are trying to "earthquake proof" your layout. That last module is somewhat reminding me of a roller coaster.
              I mean that in a positive way.
              No probs, Scott.

              It doesn't seem like it, but our big earthquake was over 11 years ago now! I'm just really hoping my layout design never gets tested!

              Here's the roller coaster! Stage 3.1.

              Click image for larger version

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              Cheers, Mark.

              Comment


              • CNE1899
                CNE1899 commented
                Editing a comment
                Mark,
                Whoa, now that looks like a roller coaster! Nice drawing BTW.

                Scott

            • Whoa, now that looks like a roller coaster! Nice drawing BTW.
              I know, right!

              The high track snaking its way away across the gorge is at its highest point here - 1550mm (61"). Meanwhile, the track leading to the mine is at its lowest at around 760mm (30"). By the time I allow for the river flowing past the mine we will have risers for the high track at around 840mm (33") long! I can't wait!

              Cheers, Mark.

              Comment


              • Hi guys.

                Just a short update.

                Photo 1 - shows the ceiling of the end module. You can see the bracing elements marked on it. This will be a tricky piece to get into position. My plan is to assemble the left side and back before moving into position and then assemble the right side in situ. I intend to make up a bit of a scaffold to hold it in position while I glue and screw. I'm thinking I will need a hand at this stage.
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                Photo 2 - and here it is with a number of the bracing elements added (rotated 180 degrees). Once I have got the rest of the bracing elements made up and attached, including the inner half circle, I will lift this piece and position it in the right orientation through in the other room on top of my Fault lines layout top. I will then attach the studs (from where my impact driver is around to the start of the second curve at bottom left). I will then hopefully be able to attach a sheet of 3mm MDF around this curve. If all this goes ok, once the glue has set then the section will be lifted into position and the last studs added. I have blocks screwed to the underside of all my joists for the studs to sit on. There are four different length studs - so there is a lot that can go wrong. I have spent a lot of time trying to think through this procedure, so fingers crossed I have everything right. Its still a few days away from the lifting in stage.
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                More soon, cheers, Mark.

                Comment


                • Very neat and precise work, Mark.
                  _________________________________________________

                  Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

                  Comment


                  • Very neat and precise work, Mark
                    Thanks, Michael.

                    I only have so many weights and clamps (and time) - so little by little.

                    I got the next area of our garden planned out over the last few days so am itching to get that underway now, too. There are two changes in elevation of around 12" each, including a set of curved steps - so the ground work will keep me busy for a while! On the look out for some cheap secondhand concrete blocks now...

                    Cheers, Mark.

                    Comment


                    • Hi guys.

                      Little by little progress pic.

                      So here we are waiting for the glue to dry. The last fins for the inner curve are in place and the curved internal wall for the pelmet is done. I'll probably add a couple of short internal walls to keep things rigid during the move.
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                      More soon, cheers, Mark.

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                      • Mark

                        You are on a roll - great progress and work. In this hobby you can never have enough clamps or weights.

                        Comment


                        • You are on a roll - great progress and work. In this hobby you can never have enough clamps or weights.
                          Thanks, John.

                          I was watching a woodworking video the other day. The guys advice re clamps was - work out how many clamps you think you will need, double it and then just keep buying clamps until you run out of storage space for them! I guess I still need some more...

                          Cheers, Mark.

                          Comment


                          • I'm impressed by your work. It's looking good. I've never attempted a curve surface like you're doing except for curving the backdrop around the corners. You make it look easy.

                            Bob
                            It's only make-believe

                            Comment


                            • I'm impressed by your work. It's looking good. I've never attempted a curve surface like you're doing except for curving the backdrop around the corners. You make it look easy.
                              Thanks, Bob.

                              Typically I am able to make a whole corner section with curved backdrop, curved pelmet and ceiling, and lift it all in as one piece. This is the first time I have had to try to do it in two pieces - or more precisely - a half finished piece lifted in and the rest finished in situ. There has been a lot of thinking along side the work you see in the photos. I managed to lift the whole ceiling piece onto the lid of my Fault Lines layout on my own. I then stood back and realised I had it rotated 180 degrees out! Because the diagonals are longer than the module's length, there is insufficient room to spin the ceiling section without first lifting it above the ceiling height of my existing layout - which I could not do on my own! A couple of deep breaths and expletives and I lifted it off, rotated and lifted it back on. I make that job sound easy, too. It wasn't!

                              Cheers, Mark.

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