Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Tellynott corner module

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Oops,

    Did a double post.

    Scott
    Last edited by CNE1899; 03-08-2022, 07:17 AM.

    Comment


    • Mark,

      You build beautiful benchwork and nice flowing curves and smooth grades. It's all going to be very dramatic when complete.

      Great progress you're making.

      Mike
      _________________________________________________

      Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

      Comment


      • Thanks for the riser tip. Enjoying your benchwork. The last photo really gives you an idea of the it's overall size.
        Thanks, Scott.

        The benckwork is a lot of fun. With all the backdrop and ceiling being part of each self contained module, and with my love of curves (both trackwork and fascia/ pelmet) and grades it soon becomes quite a complicated animal. I certainly don't think I could make allowances for everything in the planning stage so there is a fair bit of 'making it up as I go along'. The module will be somewhere between 3400mm and 3500mm long (11'2" & 11'6") and 1250mm (4'2") wide at its widest (this includes the framing and backdrop). It will reduce in width to around 750mm (2'5 1/2") in the centre. I'm working on the shape of the fascia now. This will involve, at the least, making up site plan cutouts of the Wislons Cement works so I can shuffle them around and compose my scene. I may need to make mock-ups of some or all of the buildings. Below is a link to a wonderful picture of the cement works. There will be a fair amount of selective compression involved!

        https://natlib.govt.nz/records/22904...Bpath%5D=items

        Cheers, mark.

        Comment


        • You build beautiful benchwork and nice flowing curves and smooth grades. It's all going to be very dramatic when complete.

          Great progress you're making.
          Thanks so much, Mike.

          I really love the curves. I think it helps tremendously in the framing of the scene by using curving fascia and pelmets. I must admit - it certainly creates a lot more work, but I think it is way more than worth it. I can feel a big surge of framework building coming up! I'll try to keep uploading lots of pictures and explanations as I go. I think the self contained modules on wheels idea works pretty well. I think if you looked into some sort of system where you could screw the wheels up by some distance to lower the module then you could have the module ceiling at a good viewing height, but be able to lower it sufficiently to navigate a standard door height for moving. If only I'd thought of that earlier...

          Cheers, Mark.

          Comment


          • Hi guys.

            A bit more progress. I've been spending a lot of time playing with curves trying to get an atheistically pleasing shape to the module which fits within my restrictions and allows enough room for my various views. I started by moving the module into its position against the wall and then mocked up my flotation mill in the next room. I added some extensions to the benchwork there to support and used my plan and eyeometer to line up the correct angle for best viewing. I temporarily extended the two curved track beds into the next room and made sure things would fit and clearances were sufficient. I also checked the distance from the back wall to make absolutely certain that I wasn't stealing too much space. All this involved lots of crawling through the hole in the wall - as I haven't yet dismantled my temporary wall, I've just peeled back the building paper and removed the insulation. Once happy with all this I went about designing my curve fascia.

            Photo 1 - shows the right hand end with the lime works mocked up. What looks like a lower track bed is the curve of the fascia.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG20220310095852comp.jpg
Views:	69
Size:	111.7 KB
ID:	988520

            Photo 2 - After a lot more designing I settled on the shape of the fascia for the rest of the module. I then moved on to mocking up the cement works and the track work for spurs. There isn't a lot of room here. I started by drawing up cardboard templates of the cement works floor plan. After a lot more experimenting I opted to cut the end off the left hand complex. A lot more shuffling around and I came up with the design below. I found a wye turnout gave me the best option for spurs. I also mocked up the ore wharf and placed a tramp steamer to the side of it. I allowed 110mm from the edge of the dock to the layout edge here, and so can adjust the length of the dock to suit a bigger or smaller tramp steamer. As much as I would love to build a 2' steamer, I think smaller will prove better, as it will help with the scale of Shadowlands.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG20220311152802comp.jpg
Views:	63
Size:	165.2 KB
ID:	988521

            Photo 3 - shows a closer view and the cardboard cutouts are easier to see.

            Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG20220311151757comp.jpg
Views:	67
Size:	125.2 KB
ID:	988522

            More soon, cheers, Mark.

            Comment


            • Now that's some impressed framing outstanding job with the curves!

              I like the way your doing the mock ups so everything fits.

              This has been an interesting build since day one!
              Jerry



              "And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

              Comment


              • Lots of excellent woodworking craftsmanship shown here.
                Mark, that looks very good.

                Comment


                • Mark,

                  Your work is looking very good.

                  The cement works is impressive in the number and complexity of buildings. It's right down your ally.

                  Mike
                  _________________________________________________

                  Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

                  Comment


                  • Now that's some impressed framing outstanding job with the curves!

                    I like the way your doing the mock ups so everything fits.

                    This has been an interesting build since day one!

                    Thanks so much for the kind words, Jerry.


                    I'm like a pig in mud doing this sort of thing. I'm having a ball of a time.


                    Cheers, Mark.

                    Comment


                    • Lots of excellent woodworking craftsmanship shown here.
                      Mark, that looks very good.
                      Thanks, Jerry.

                      Its coming together. I bought a little Makita jig saw second hand in a bundle of tools (I was really after the belt sander) and had a $30 repair done on it. It has had a lot of use recently - well worth the $30. It cuts the curves nice and square.

                      Cheers, Mark.

                      Comment


                      • Your work is looking very good.

                        The cement works is impressive in the number and complexity of buildings. It's right down your ally.
                        Thanks, Mike.

                        Yes - its a great group of structures. Its a shame I have had to cut a bit off the back, but I'm hoping it will still look very impressive. It will be a fun scratchbuild - lots of concrete.

                        Cheers, Mark.

                        Comment


                        • Hi guys.

                          For the mock up of the wharf area in the last set of photos I marked things out on a piece of 2.5mm MDF. Once I had sorted out the shape that worked I cut the 2.5mm MDF to the correct shape with the jig saw. I then used this as a template on the 16mm MDF. I lightly marked out the shape on the 16mm MDF and then used a large compass (a piece of long timber with a screw at one end and a series of holes into which I can insert a pencil at the other). I found centres, tangent etc and marked these nice and visibly and then carefully cut out the curves with my jigsaw. I then put the piece in position and marked all the joists for cutting. I removed and cut the 90x19mm joists with a hand saw. I then added some pine ripped tp 43x19mm on top of the joists, glued and screwed, as well as a couple fanned out at the end for fixing. I then replaced the piece of 16mm MDF and marked the fanned pieces, removed and cut these. Finally the 16mm MDF was glued and screwed into position.

                          Photo 1 - shows the module in position with the mocked up flotation mill in next door. This is at the correct height. I allowed a little tolerance for the modules, as the floor is not quite even. I will lift and add slithers under the wheels to adjust. I had to remove one of the temporary wall studs as the layout edge went right through its centre. I have decided to remove the jamb from the wall as well to give me a little extra room (white piece of timber).
                          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG20220311224703comp.jpg Views:	38 Size:	77.9 KB ID:	988592

                          Photo 2 - and here we are a little closer in. That's the heel of my hand in the photo as I hold the building paper out of the way.
                          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG20220311224742comp.jpg Views:	36 Size:	144.2 KB ID:	988593

                          Photo 3 - a close up showing the fanned timber supports.
                          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG20220311224759comp.jpg Views:	35 Size:	150.1 KB ID:	988594

                          Photo 4 - from further back with the cement works site mocked in.
                          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG20220311224805comp.jpg Views:	36 Size:	69.8 KB ID:	988595

                          Photo 5 - with the mocked up cement works site removed to show the nice flowing curve. The internal curve is 880mm, then a short straight, then 670mm flowing into 1524mm then back to 670mm at the wall.
                          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG20220311224845comp.jpg Views:	38 Size:	117.7 KB ID:	988596

                          Photo 6 - one from a higher angle. I could have gone a little wider for the cement works, but I wanted the flowing curve around the lime works to protrude further. I felt aesthetically this worked better, and gave this a higher priority than the cement works site. It also means the isle width will be a little wider here.
                          Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG20220311224859comp.jpg Views:	36 Size:	149.8 KB ID:	988597

                          More soon, cheers, Mark.
                          Last edited by mark_dalrymple; 03-25-2022, 04:41 AM.

                          Comment


                          • Mark,

                            Your curves are very nice! I mean the benchwork. Wow, not only benchwork, but actual framing .
                            Very nice for a beginner to see how someone goes about figuring out details like views, scene hierarchy, rail layout, and form.
                            Your paper mockups look good as well.

                            Thanks,
                            Scott

                            Comment


                            • Your curves are very nice! I mean the benchwork. Wow, not only benchwork, but actual framing .
                              Very nice for a beginner to see how someone goes about figuring out details like views, scene hierarchy, rail layout, and form.
                              Your paper mockups look good as well.
                              Thanks for your kind words, Scott.

                              Its great to hear you are getting so much out of my postings. I think for a lot of people planning stops after the initial plan has been drawn up. For me it is an ongoing process. My son is visiting at the moment. He was a bit taken a back by the scope of the project. He was asking me how to deal with things when I die. I'm hoping he is a bit premature! I'm 52 now - and am hoping I might get another 30 years or so of chipping away at things yet! Still - nice that he sees my work as something that will need to be preserved if possible. It also reminded me that I will need to write some comprehensive deconstruction instructions for when that time does eventually come.

                              I'm working on the splicing together of the two sections at the moment. Again, this is first involving a lot of 1:1 scale planning. I need to consider the relation of the flotation mill with the new module and the mine that will be to its left, I need to sort out the spur trackwork to the mine - remembering to attempt to keep the trackwork as simple as possible across the module joins, I need to make sure I don't encroach on my isle space, and of course, there are all the different heights to consider....

                              Cheers, Mark.

                              Comment


                              • CNE1899
                                CNE1899 commented
                                Editing a comment
                                Mark,
                                I'm 59, and hoping I get another 30! I am building my first layout, 2Ftx2Ft (60.9x60.9 cm)
                                After looking at how you are approaching your layout top, I think I will cut my top out of card board first, before I cookie cut out of plywood.
                                Scott

                            • Mark

                              Your benchwork looks fantastic.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X