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  • Mark,

    Regarding y0ur comment about the difficulty added to scratchbuilding a structure when there are multiple levels, that's something I miss with my one-level layout. With all the track and most of the scenery and structures completed on my layout, at some point in the future I will need to build scenes that will be added to my original plan, or else just stop building, not a good option. You've motivated me to think about new scenes that have a vertical component.

    Mike
    _________________________________________________

    Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

    Comment


    • Mark,

      I started to try to read thru your thread from the beginning before I commented, But I am just going to comment.
      The small layout mockup is well done and looks to be quite helpful.
      Your building looks great and very intricate! Clean and accurate construction, nice job so far.
      Thanks, Scott.

      Yes - the mock up of the layout is a great tool to visulise the finished layout, and actually cutting it into pieces so you can view scenes as you would while standing in different spots in the room is very beneficial.

      The flotation mill is coming together well. I'm still a bit behind with my posting, but I got the three flotation tank timber supports done on the weekend along with some good progress on the elevated walkway next to the tall tank. These are all still separate sub assemblies, but the fit is pretty good. I was pleased with the weekend's progress.

      I hope you will find the time to finish reading through my thread. As well as the structure kitbashing and scratchbuilding, I try to talk a lot about my design techniques, which I think are a bit different to most. You might also be interested in the benchwork, where I build self contained units on wheels complete with backdrops, ceilings and pelmets.

      Cheers, Mark.

      Comment


      • CNE1899
        CNE1899 commented
        Editing a comment
        Mark,
        Thanks for the reply, and yes it does sound interesting. I am even more motivated to finish reading.

        Scott

    • Mark,

      Regarding y0ur comment about the difficulty added to scratchbuilding a structure when there are multiple levels, that's something I miss with my one-level layout. With all the track and most of the scenery and structures completed on my layout, at some point in the future I will need to build scenes that will be added to my original plan, or else just stop building, not a good option. You've motivated me to think about new scenes that have a vertical component.
      Thanks, Mike.

      Always good to motivate. The vertical element certainly adds to the headwork, and that's an element I really enjoy. Lots of fine exterior timberwork also adds to the complexity, timeframe and aesthetic appeal.

      I know Iain Rice used to build narrow, long layouts which he kept stacked on a rack against the wall. He could then pull one layout out at a time to set up and work on, but actually have three or four different layouts with entirely different themes on the go. Cathy Millett has done the same thing with dioramas, where a chunk of the layout can be pulled out and replaced with a different scene. I'm not sure if either of these ideas would work for you, especially as you are near completion, but worth mentioning. As a layout planner I find Iain Rice very good. It might be worth tracking down some of his plans to check out. He does lots of stuff with curved backdrops and breaking the layout into separate scenes. He also uses nice flowing curves in his trackwork which I personally love. I have several curved turnouts in Tellynott, and there will be many more to come in Shadowlands.

      Thanks for checking in on my progress, cheers, Mark.

      Comment


      • Mark, sorry I haven't posted to your on going adventures here in awhile, I've had a lot of stuff to deal with lately.
        Your current project the Flotation Mill looks absolutely amazing! It will be another awesome addition to your ever expanding layout.
        Keep up the great work!

        Greg

        Comment


        • Mark, sorry I haven't posted to your on going adventures here in awhile, I've had a lot of stuff to deal with lately.
          Your current project the Flotation Mill looks absolutely amazing! It will be another awesome addition to your ever expanding layout.
          Keep up the great work!
          Thanks for stopping by, Greg, and for your encouraging words.

          Yesterday's modeling session was spent considering the pros and cons of building a thin fully insulated temporary wall in front of the double roller door (on the interior) versus the cost and other problems involved in adding permanent cladding along with a large over-height ranch slider/ French doors/ bifolds. This involved redrawing my Shadowlands track plan with 6" less depth to the second model room in the barn. I'll go over this thought process in an upcoming post.

          Cheers, Mark.

          Comment


          • Hi guys.

            A nice afternoon modeling with my good friend, Neil yesterday. Thursday is usually my favourite day of the week because of these sessions. Below is my progress.

            Photo 1 - shows the quick plan I drew up. I drew this up on a cereal box and then cut out the gable wall to use as a template. The piece missing is where I changed my mind on the height of the wall. After I cut in my window and door openings I decided they looked too low when compared to the photo. I have no plan of this barn - only two photos of Jock's model. I also discovered that I had used one of my 4/4 windows on the main sub-assembly (where I was supposed to use a 6 pane window). I decided I wanted both windows to be 4/4 windows on the barn, so will have to prime and paint one more. I had to cut the window and door opening to the left of the barn on the main sub-assembly in after the structure was assembled, as I missed them earlier. I'm pleased I don't do that too often! And just to rub salt into the wound, its been so long since I was doing all these openings that I forgot what I had decided. I could remove the window and patch below, but I'm a little worried I'll unnecessarily cause damage - and I know if I do I'll be really peeved - telling myself "I told you so! You didn't need to do that!" But I do think a 6 pane will look better... Tomorrow is a brave new day...
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            Photo 2 - shows the three barn walls cut out and stained. I have braced the two side walls.
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            Photo 3 - shows the back of the weird wall. I decided I wanted the main roof of the lower level on the main sub-assembly to run all the way through as though the barn could have been a later addition. I didn't make it this way on the mock-up. You can see the wall is braced and spliced together,
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            Photo 4 - shows the weird wall sitting in position. There will be rock running up steeply at this point. I might add some spackle to the styrene walls at this point to resemble plaster over concrete. There is an aerial walkway and set of steps running from the front of the barn, up and along the side of the barn (past the door) and then up to a deck in front of the door and window on the main sub-assembly.
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            I also grained and stained some 8x8, 10x8 and 10x10 for bearers, posts and joists for the barn. Already I'm needing more stripwood!

            More soon, cheers, Mark.

            Comment


            • Hi guys.

              I decided I need to get the supports for the barn done at this stage. The two photos I had of the barn were either at the wrong angle or too lower quality to really see what was going on. I checked out a few photos of local coal barns from some of my NZ books and drew up a quick plan on some masking tape that I affixed to my cutting mat. I covered this in lunch paper and then went to work on the two support walls. I used 10x10's and 10x8's. I opted for three posts with a lower dwang and cross bracing between. With my last Tichy Train order I bought some rivet plate sheets and so I cut this up to represent nail plates to strengthen the wall design and add a bit of neat detail. I went all out and made enough for both sides of both walls. I also cleaned up some footings left over from a Campbell water tower.
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              I cut a hole in the underside of the barn floor and added what I think is some window security bars in their frame to represent a grizzly through which the pure ore is loaded into the wagons. (please let me know if I have my terminology wrong here). I doubt this will ever be seen - but I felt the need to do something here. I primed this and then gave it a shot of some tan paint before gluing it in position. I added 10x8 joists to the floor. I may add some 8x2 to cover the edge of the grizzly.

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              Below are the colours I used to pints the nail plates and the plates in position.

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              More soon, cheers, Mark.

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              • Hi guys.

                After a bit of fitting work I attached the barn to the main sub assembly. I gave it a good sanding to give it some tooth and then added spackle, using a single edged razorblade to smooth. Once dry I sanded using a circular motion and then painted with grey primer. You can see I also added a sheet of block work for a bit of variety. The two post and beam walls are just sitting in position. I glazed, dullcoated (the inside) and glued in the remaining windows and doors (including priming yet another 4/4 that I had forgotten). I added the last small gable wall and added some strengthening. I glued on my nail plates and touched up the edges and visible backs.

                Photo 1 - shows the small gable wall attached and braced.
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                Photo 2- shows the plaster work and block wall.
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                Photos 3 and 4 - show the barn close up.
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                Photos 5 and 6 - show the overall structure.
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                We have a modeling weekend next weekend so I'm hoping to get into some of the timberwork - the support towers for the flotation tanks and maybe some of the aerial walkways and stairs. There is also the roofs to start work on. I don't think I will run out of things to do!

                More soon, cheers, Mark.

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                • Awesome !!!
                  Jerry



                  "And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

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                  • Fantastic build Mark.
                    Carl

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                    • That looks fantastic, Mark.

                      I haven't gotten the original article out, but I suspect you're adding a lot of detail to the magazine model.

                      Mike
                      _________________________________________________

                      Not everything that is faced can be changed, but nothing can be changed until it is faced. James Baldwin

                      Comment


                      • Awesome !!!
                        Fantastic build Mark.
                        Thanks very much, Jerry and Carl.

                        Still a long ways to go, but its been a fun and interesting build.

                        Cheers, Mark.

                        Comment


                        • That looks fantastic, Mark.

                          I haven't gotten the original article out, but I suspect you're adding a lot of detail to the magazine model.
                          Thanks for stopping by and for your kind words, Mike.

                          I have been taking my cues as much from Jock's scratchbuild as from the plans. Having said that the plans do give you a fair amount of detail. Its more that its difficult to work out exactly what is intended. The suspended car barn is not in the original plans. The decking over the flotation tanks is supported by piles in the tanks in the plans. This seemed rather strange to me so I opted for two bearers spanning the tanks to support the decking (as Jock did). There will also be a rooftop water tank which is not part of the plans.

                          Cheers, Mark.

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                          • Mark,
                            Very impressive work on an imposing structure! So many surfaces and windows, you can be forgiven for forgetting one or two.
                            I like the speckled foundation as well.

                            Scott

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                            • Nice progress, Mark. It looks like things are coming together.

                              George
                              The sky is not my limit, it's my playground.

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