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Repeatable Cutting Tool

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  • Keeper
    replied
    Wow, that JointMaker Pro tablesaw is amazing. The price is rediculous, but what a beautiful tool. I'm not sure how practical it would be for modeling, unless you were building large scale structures.

    Thanks everybody, for pitching in your thoughts on this. It's been most helpful.

    Brett

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  • jaynjay
    replied
    Dave,

    That JointMaker Pro looks pretty neat. I was seriously thinking about it; but the $1200 price tage is a little too spendy for me.

    Thanks for the link, though

    Leave a comment:


  • deemery
    replied
    Check this out: http://www.boingboing.net/2010/12/18...d-table-s.html

    This could definitely have applications in our model railroading world.

    dave

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  • deemery
    replied
    Here's my Proxxon table saw with the MicroMark sled and a stop clamped to the front of the sled:



    The scribble on the back reminds me to push the sled to the right to get the most accurate cuts. (There's a bit of slop in the sled's rails that ride in the table saw's grooves.) Note the pieces of wood glued to the front of the sled, on either side of the blade slot (easier to see on the photo below.) They remind me to keep my fingers away from the blade when pushing the sled to make cuts.

    And here's my 'power tool stand':



    There are a couple good ideas here to mention:

    * The stand itself is a cheapo wood cabinet, sitting on a plywood base, with lockable casters on it. That way I can swing the cabinet out if I need more clearance to work on larger projects.

    * There's a plywood top with T-slot strip in it (the red stripes between the two tools.) The tools are held in place with appropriate clamps. This way I can move the tools around, remove them, etc.

    * There's a floor/foot "press to operate" switch, which provides both convenience and safety. Power goes to the switch and then to the tools. The only thing is that I have to remember to turn off each tool when it's not in use (otherwise I'll have both tools running when I press the pedal down, duh!)

    * You can't have enough light on a power tool bench!

    dave

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  • mabloodhound
    replied
    This link was posted on the Conspiracy.

    http://www.instructables.com/id/Mini...remel-rotary-/

    A good way to make use of that Dremel tool. Not only cut off but router, sander, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Locoman
    replied
    Thanks Terry. your modifications gives me the ideas I needed.

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  • jcoop
    replied
    http://www.instructables.com/id/Mini...remel-rotary-/

    Interesting Instrucktables

    John

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  • Geezer
    replied
    Jeeze John....I thought the "hammer" was for "attitude adjustments"... ;-)

    Leave a comment:


  • desertdrover
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by terry hansley


    Louis

    Styrene.contact glued to Poplar.

    The wood slides nice and tic marks can be made with a pencil and erased easily.

    You know, all the pictures I have posted,---that was the first time the pictures were aligned horizontal instead of vertical----

    Strange.

    Terry H 8D


    Thanks again Terry. Nice addition build.
    The pictures line up showing vertical when there is a space between them in the "Posting Form".

    If there is no space they run together and come out showing horizonal. (together/all in one)

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  • terry_hansley
    replied
    Louis

    Styrene.contact glued to Poplar.

    The wood slides nice and tic marks can be made with a pencil and erased easily.

    You know, all the pictures I have posted,---that was the first time the pictures were aligned horizontal instead of vertical----

    Strange.

    Terry H 8D

    Leave a comment:


  • desertdrover
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by terry hansley



    Hi All

    Here are some pictures of my changes to the Harbor Freight saw.I am very pleased with the repeatability and the quality is certainly worth the price. Replacement blades are at the store although I have cut a lot of strip wood and still have the original on.

    If you notice there is a back table to support angle cuts as the vice swivels to accomodate them. Ask if you have questions.

    Terry H 8D




    Terry thanks for the picture and idea. That makes this tool a whole lot more versatile that way. I like it! :up:

    Is that just white plastic on top of the woodwork???

    Leave a comment:


  • Frederic_Testard
    replied
    John, I bought this one too, about two years ago. It cuts well, and you can repeat cuts. I've found it was a bit difficult to set the length to be cut, but maybe there are some tricks I haven't yet discovered.

    Leave a comment:


  • jaynjay
    replied
    This is an interesting topic. My NWSL choppers and even the chopper that I made have limits. They will only cut very thin basswood without the blade deflecting.

    So I started checking out the various cutting tools listed on this thread. I even considered the $180 "sliding" rasor blade tool. But then I thought; that the blade will still start to deflect on anything 1/8 of an inch or thicker. Can't see cutting and then using a Tru-Sander to finish it either.

    I looked at both Chop-type saws. The Harbor Freight saw kind of scared me; the price is just too cheap for what you are aledgely getting. I found of "demo" of this tool on UTube and the spokesman was demonstrating on wood and aluminum tubing. He is saying how great the saw is; but I was listening to the motor bog down on thin-wall tubing.

    I looked at the more expensive one and I found no complaints about it, I even watched a demo version of UTube. Big difference.

    I've worked with tools all my life and I have learned that you get what you pay for.

    So the UPS came today and dropped this off:



    BTW the infamous hammer on the left was used on the mountain destruction

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  • jcoop
    replied
    Got one of the Harbor Freight little chop saws today. It was on sale and I had the cash, so it fallowed me home.

    Let me start off saying that I have a woodshop full of some nice vintage iron and know the difference between what's good and what's not. I could cut wood on 5 different saws in the shop, but wanted to add something to the modeling bench for quick cuts. i have a NWSL Chopper that I use allot, but it does have it's limits. working on something tonight I needed 40 45degree cuts, the chopper would have taken a while and not have done as nice of job as this has done, I could cut 5 boards at a time and they where cut near perfect. Not going to build a full size house with it, but for the bench so far so good.

    I did have two complaints about it. 1. the stupid safety button that you had to push to cut something. 2. you could not open the saw up high enough to get my big paws in there to clamp the wood. First order of business was to open it up and remove the safety button. Then hacked off the stops on the back of the saw that prevented it from opening up all the way. Now I am happy.

    The price was less than I paid for the NWSL Chopper, it will not replace it, but they will each have there place on the workbench.

    John

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  • jaynjay
    replied
    NWSL still sells the "original" Chopper series:

    http://www.nwsl.com/tools/cutting-to...ppers-i-ii-iii

    Leave a comment:

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