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Getting Sweethome ready to exhibit

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  • Getting Sweethome ready to exhibit

    Since I am taking the layout to a model railway/railroad exhibition this easter, I thought I'd do a photographic essay showing how I get the layout ready to travel.

    When I designed Sweethome, I built in a number of features specifically intended to erect and dismantle the layout quickly and efficiently, and to transport everything with minimal risk of damage. For speed, I permanently attach as much scenery and detailling as possible, so I don't have to stand up figures, plant trees and other items when I arrive at a show.

    A big timesaver was to construct stock boxes to carry all the freight cars and locos safely, rather than spend hours packing each item into its original box. As well as being a timesaver, this is also a big space saver.

    On to the dismantling.

    The first thing is to remove the curtain from around the layout.




    Next I take down the light/fascia assembly and the metal brackets.







    The home-made electrical multi-pin connectors are removed and packed away so they arent left behind.



    continued...


    Jon
    Sweethome Chicago is now on Facebook



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  • #2
    Once the connections are removed, I shift the 'nebby' (curious) cat.




    and pack the freight cars away into their stock boxes, made by fitting dividers into box files and lining with foam. I use different coloured boxes for each type of freight car to make packing easier and store the car card/waybill with the car.










    Continued...

    Jon
    Sweethome Chicago is now on Facebook



    Sweethome Alabama is now on Facebook



    Hudson Road is now on Facebook



    My Videos



    My Railimages

    Comment


    • #3
      Now the stock is packed, I remove the 2 end scenic dividers




      I then remove the coach bolts and wingnuts to separate the boards




      I attach carrying spacers to one end of each of the 8 boards - I fixed a carpet tile to each face of the divider to protect the rail ends on the layout.




      I then pair up the boards and bolt them together to form a box. Each layout backscene forms a protective side to the 'box'. I pin a piece of packing foam to the top of the backscene to prevent damage to the sky from rubbing.




      Continued..

      Jon
      Sweethome Chicago is now on Facebook



      Sweethome Alabama is now on Facebook



      Hudson Road is now on Facebook



      My Videos



      My Railimages

      Comment


      • #4
        Once the layout is boxed up I usually have to banish another pesky cat.




        Then I do a check of the area to make sure I havent forgotten anything. The metal frame that the layout rests on at home is left behind - The layout has its own trestle legs for exhibitions, but the ceiling is too low for me to use them at home.




        Finally the layout is ready to go.




        I'll post some photos from the show after I get home on Sunday.

        Jon
        Sweethome Chicago is now on Facebook



        Sweethome Alabama is now on Facebook



        Hudson Road is now on Facebook



        My Videos



        My Railimages

        Comment


        • #5
          Best of luck at your show Jon. It looks like you've mastered the process. This reminds me of a club I used to belong to. We had a portable layout (not modular) that we transported to shows. There were 10 sections all together, along with backdrop boards and a crate we used to pack all the miscellaneous hardware, cords, etc. Over the years, we implemented design changes to streamline the process and got it to the point where we could have the entire layout up and running in less than 2 hours. It was a challenge, but a fun one!
          Mark

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          • #6
            Very interesting! Thanks for sharing.

            Could you describe the boxes you use for the rolling stock? Looks like you found some sort of box that fits HO cars pretty well, so I was wondering what you use as I have to transport some cars for a modular setup and using the original boxes, although they work well, is time and space consuming. Your method looks safe and compact.

            Mike McNamara

            Delran, NJ

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            • #7
              Thanks for the info John. I have now requisitioned a box file from the office as I needed a similar solution

              Nice cats too
              Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

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              • #8
                Thanks, Jon, for the good information on how you pack up for the move. When you get a chance, it would be interesting to see how setting up the layout looks. I’m interested in seeing the framework you use to support the layout

                George
                Flying is the 2nd greatest thrill known to man. Landing is the first.

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                • #9
                  quote:


                  Originally posted by MikeMc


                  Very interesting! Thanks for sharing.

                  Could you describe the boxes you use for the rolling stock? Looks like you found some sort of box that fits HO cars pretty well, so I was wondering what you use as I have to transport some cars for a modular setup and using the original boxes, although they work well, is time and space consuming. Your method looks safe and compact.

                  Mike McNamara

                  Delran, NJ


                  Hi Mike, John is using box files, which are for storing loose leaf A4 paper. They are very common in Europe but much less so in North America. Carl Arendt is always commenting on them in his micro layouts website because quite a few people build layouts inside them.

                  They are made out off thick, tough cardboard and have a latch to hold the lid closed - very handy
                  Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

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