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  • INRAIL
    replied
    Wes, Ditto! I agree with everything mentioned here. I use Silfor prairie tufts (weed clumps), pot toppers, lots of super tree material from Sceneic Express, and various kinds of fine and course ground foam or turf. I like static grass too but for late summer and autumn, a mix of various sizes of ground foam turf along with prairie tufts or static grass should be used. In the late summer and fall, there is more leafy vegetation than there is just plain old grass or weeds. When I apply my medium course ground foam, and wet it down with water and dish soap and soak it with glue and water mix. While the turf is still wet, I sprinkle on fine turf of two to three different colors (I like the mixed turf from Woodland Scenics). It gives a better leafy look that just leaving the course turf stand by itself. I also mix in pot toppers or prairie tufts. I'll then spray more water and detergent over all of this with a fine mist hairspray bottle. This will get the glue and water that was previously applied to soak up through the fine turf you sprinkled on later.

    I like using Scenic Express Super Trees to make wooded areas. I'll drill some random holes and plant several trees. I then take bits and pieces of super trees and stuff them in between the planted trees. I do a lot of stuffing. I'll finish by spraying the wooded area with maximum hold hairspray. If there are structures nearby, just take a sheet of light weight cardboard and hold it up in front of your structure so it doesn't get hair spray all over it. You can do the same with the water and dish soap soaking.

    Tom Johnson

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  • wesleybeks
    replied
    Thanks for the pictures Karl and Mario.

    Will be keeping them to come back to when im doing my scenery.

    Karl, like KP im also keen to see your How To on scenery.

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  • hon3_rr
    replied
    Karl, Please do post your how to by example. It's always great to see how folks do things, and I'm sure we can pick up some ideas. Thanks in advance.

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  • Mario_Rapinett
    replied
    a little project, where natural materials were used for greater 3d effect

    http://www.modvid.com.au/html/body_meyers_creek.html

    cheers mate

    PS... there are some examples of scenery on this thread... thanks to Karl and others

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  • Mario_Rapinett
    replied
    Wes

    Natural materials are the best form for 3D scenery. My web site shows many examples.

    here is a small diorama I create within a half hour, during a clinic in Seattle...

    All the materials were collected from outside the place I was doing the clinic. Only the sage bush was purchased.

    Your backyard, parks, creek beds, etc contain years of modeling scenery stuff... beats that RTR stuff in a packet.....

    cheers

    Download Attachment: scenery01.jpg
    97.87 KB

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  • UKGuy
    replied
    Here are a couple more shots of 'spare' space on the same diorama. Again lots of variation in colour/texture depth, which for me is where the realism comes from.





    Also, here are a couple of overhead 'google earth' pictures of the diorama to give a perspective of how the scenery fits with the structure.





    Some thing to note is that in the bottom left corner and the upper middle edge, although these areas are only around 1"x1" and 1"x2" they still got the same levels of scenery as the bigger areas.

    Now, yes this particular dio is O and most of you work in HO, but, I use the same materials and techniques in both scales, the HO PR3 layout was done almost exactly the same.

    Rather than back track over this 'old' dio I have another one in need of scenic treatment that I would be happy to post the steps as I do it if you would like.

    Bear in mind I am in no way trying to proclaim that I am a master at scenery, just to share my thoughts and the way I do it. Hopefully someone can get something from it to adapt or use for themselves.

    Karl.A

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  • hon3_rr
    replied
    Karl.. Great instincts. I think for a lot of us we just move stuff around until it 'feels' or 'looks' right. I know I do. I guess it's one of the reasons that we should not just 'place and glue'. I have noted that for a lot of guys who have created great scenes it was not until much later that they realized the technical aspect of the scene which made it look good. About a month ago there was a fairly involved conversation on the balance of mass in a scene on the Finescale Modeling Forum. ( http://www.finescalerr.com/smf/ ) Looking forward to your additional postings on creating a scene.

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  • wesleybeks
    replied
    Thanks for the pictures and reply Karl.

    That is some fantastic scenery you have made in that little scene. Im looking forward to your

    explanation of how you did it. Im Sure its going to be very interesting and helpfull.

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  • UKGuy
    replied
    Thank you for you kind words Kris,

    it hasnt really been hiding its just a 'spare' corner on one of the only two dio's I've actually finished in the past three years.

    Usually the pics are concentrated on the structure and not the surroundings.

    If there was any 'framing' or 'mini scenes' or 'scene blocks' going on it was all coincidental or subconcious, not planned, just moving things around 'till I liked how it looked.

    I'll post some more scenic closeups tomorrow around the dio to show more examples of the layering and variations of colour/texture/form, at which point you'll probably recognise the dio. That is of course if there would be interest to see it. I would explain my thoughts as it was made for each area shown.

    Karl.A

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  • hon3_rr
    replied
    Well said Karl... and BTW... where have you been hiding this little gem?? What a wonderful study. I also realy like how you used the wood as scene blocks to create 3 different mini scenes while at the same time framing the junk pile. Nice...

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  • UKGuy
    replied
    Hi Wesley,

    I really enjoy doing scenery personally and I can spend as much time scenicking a scene as building the structure (which is only right IMO... )

    Firstly, really REALLY look at pictures of the area you want to depict to get an idea of what type of plantlife is actually there and how it is structured/combined with the other plantlife and terrain.

    Secondly grab as many items as you can that are even vaguely plantlike from anywhere you see them. Even items that you wouldnt usually think of using.

    Diversity and variation as mentioned previously certainly provides the most realistic scenery I have personally seen.

    Third, cut a 4"x4" or 6"x6" piece of foam/card/whatever and have fun, try things out.

    As well as variation, layering is also an important part I feel in realistic scenery, I usually like to have at least four various layers before I even get up to the grasses and small shrubery....

    I'm sure I used over 20 different scenery 'materials' on this small 3"x6" area alone. Not outstanding scenery, or photography, but it was close to hand for a photo and shows what I am trying to say.







    Fantastic work on the Quincy scenery Kris.

    Karl.A

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  • wesleybeks
    replied
    Thanks for taking the time to reply guys. Its really appreciated. If you have any other ideas or hints etc, please post them.

    Sure there is plenty of begginers here on the forum who can learn from your posts.

    KP I really loved your pictures of your Quincys Salvage. You did a phenominal job on it.

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  • hon3_rr
    replied
    Wes,

    When I do ground scenery I keep a couple of items in mind. First is light. Think of sunlight and if the diorama was in the real world, where would sunlight play at different times of day. Always keep the sun path constant to the diorama. Also think about shadows cast by various walls, structures and hills. The second item is water, and all of the very small threads of depressions which it creates. Think of how a light rain would drain down the hill, around various structures, objects and roads. Then think about how light will dry the areas, and plant the appropriate colored weeds for the area in mind, remembering that nature will provide a natural watering and the plants will be greener where the water drains. It also helps to select a specific month or two in the year and model with those colors in mind.

    I use a lot of products to make weeds. Caspia branches glued together back to back with ground foam, Supertree material, lots of jute twin, ground mat foam rolled and twisted between my fingers for the base of the bush, Silflor weeds, which I really like but are a bit expensive. I also use lots of different colored (AMI Scenery) ground foams, medium and fine textures - but use with caution. I use sifted dirt (through 2 layers of panty hose) as the top layer, with sand and just a bit larger pebbles/grit under the top layer, and will sprinkle the grit along the edges of paths.

    The following is are pictures modeled for the late April-May time of year in a higher elevation, approximately 4000 feet.

    Note in the final picture the dark green weed pattern coming out of each side of the bumper box where the water would run. I used a little too dark weeds on this, but it really shows the patterens I'm trying to express.






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  • Dutchman
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by wesleybeks



    Your pictures are the exact kind of effect im going for Bruce. There is varying heights and it looks realistic. How do you glue everything down?


    Wes,

    I brush diluted white glue (about 50/50) over the painted scenery base (plywood, foam, ground goop, etc.) On to that I sift the first layer of dirt and sprinkle the first layer of foam. Any additional layers of foam need to be held by dripping diluted white glue (or matte medium) from above. I use a much more diluted mixture for that. Any foliage clumps, tufts, or pot toppers, get full strength white glue applied on their 'bottom side' before putting them in place.

    For more info on pot toppers, here is a link:http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/t...earchTerms=Pot

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  • wesleybeks
    replied
    Thanks Bruce and John

    Your pictures are the exact kind of effect im going for Bruce. There is varying heights and it looks realistic. How do you glue everything down?

    Thanks for the link Rick. Will go through it this evening. I know Mike C always has great ideas.

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