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Big River S.S. Maru stuck on gravel bar

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  • Big River S.S. Maru stuck on gravel bar

    This will be an attempt to build the S.S. Maru. The donkey powered boat caught my eye and has been saying ..build me. Not a whole lot of information is known about the craft. Most information can be found here.

    http://www.krisweb.com/krisbigriver/...ry/hpbig20.jpg

    June 13, 1900 Big River Maru was launched at the mill without fanfare. (It was 40 feet long, 16 feet wide and approximately 3 feet high, with a flat bottom. A stern driven paddle wheel was its motivation. A licensed engineer was required to run the Maru)

    The Big River Maru was used to drive log rafts, break up logjams and ferry workers and logging camp residents up and down river. Had a licensed captain and first engineer. The engineer was George Jarvis and Phil Goodhart was the fireman.

    December 6, 1919 The new Maru, Big River #2 was launched at the mill. (Its designer and builder was John Peterson. The principal difference between the new craft and the old one was the shed roof over the paddle wheel)

    December 29, 1919 The new Maru, Bib River #2, made a fast run to the Boom, taking 25 minutes on a slack tide. (It was the last such type of craft. Some of its remains still rest in the north bank mudflat, across the river from Iron Pin Hole.

    Lets build this little workhorse. This is where I'm at currently.

    'the beginning'



    'today'



    Follow along and participate with your scale version (build a boat) with comments, suggestions, condemnation, torch[:-devil]! I'm not a boat builder, just want a fair rendition of the Maru.

    Philip
    Philip

  • #2
    Nice start, Philip. And you've found a very interesting picture of the original boat.

    Can you describe how you finally completed the wheels?

    Comment


    • #3
      Very nice job on the wheel Philip. Looking forward to watching this project come together.

      Comment


      • #4
        Phillip

        Nice start and a interesting boat. Looking forward to checking in on this thread.

        Jerry
        Jerry



        "And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

        Comment


        • #5
          Philip,

          Interesting looking boat and I am glad to see another sternwheeler being constructed.

          Since you know that I am also interested in boat construction I will be following along on this journey. :up: :up:
          <img src="http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/data/bbags/20076794158_b3b.jpg" alt="" /><br /><br>John Bagley<br /><br>Modeling the Alaska Railroad in HO in Wildwood Georgia.

          Comment


          • #6
            Interesting subject. But can you make clear for me if the craft moved by means of the donkey engine's piston or was the donkey just used for the steam that powered a separate drive/piston system for the wheel, housed inside the shed?

            From what I can see in this photo, the donkey is rigged to the cranes.

            Cool idea you had!

            Christopher [:-clown]
            Clowning around with trains.



            Comment


            • #7
              Nice looking craft, looking forward to your progress. Looks to me like you are off on the right foot with that wheel.


              Louis L&R Western Railroad
              Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

              Comment


              • #8
                Neat project Philip!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Philip, Great start on the S.S.MARU, I'm looking foward to seeing this come together.Christopher, as I recall reading somewhere, there was a chain drive from the donkey to the rear, with a sprocket connecting to a second chain drive to allow for more power, but there doesn't seem to be any photographs of the port side anywhere. I've been busy moving things from storage back into the Museum before we get any deep snow, so I haven't had time to start on this, but hopefully after new year I will get a round "tuit" Tsp.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Philip,

                    I like the start of the boat, I am looking forward to your build.

                    Larry

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks for the positive comments. I've prepared a tutorial and will post it tommorrow after the lounge opens. Its bed time for me..whooped..[|)] to much pre holiday cheer

                      Philip
                      Philip

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Philip,

                        Great start! Looking good so far. When you shoot some more photo could you please pose a scale figure near the boat? It is hard to gain a perspective on these sorts of things with no reference point. Boats and boilers did come in all sizes.

                        Looking forward to more.

                        --Stu--
                        --Stu--

                        It\'s a great day whenever steam heads out into the timber!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks for all the positive comments. I always figured the donkey boiler served both the winch and the paddle drive system. BTW, I have no idea how the gearing would have worked. Most likely driven by a shaft with a crank. Then it could have been chain drive with a jackshaft as Teaspoon described.

                          quote:


                          Originally posted by Frederic Testard



                          Can you describe how you finally completed the wheels?


                          Yes Frederic. I'll post some photos. I'm still working on two additional wheels. This part of the project is very time consuming and hard to explain..hence the pictures.

                          I know most folks know basic angles and woodworking, so don't take this wheel tutorial as an insult. It is for those who don't know, but are interested in learning. The wheels were made from common bench tools. The plans were drawn up on cad standard http://www.cadstd.com/ a free program and makes for easy planning that you can just glue your parts to when assembling the pieces together. If your worried about to much glue use wax paper between your plans and parts. It will keep them from sticking.

                          I started by cutting 36 wood pieces on the chop saw with a stop attached to the table. Length will vary depending on scale.



                          I then trued the fuzz on the ends.

                          I then extended the lines on the paddle end of the spoke to aid in making the taper. Repeat hub end of spoke.



                          Transfer the lines.



                          I then made two jigs for cutting the taper into the spokes. check the next six photos for details. The taper is 8" at the hub and 4" at the paddle end.













                          I then made a concave cut in the hub end of the spoke and trimed the spoke end flush to the drawing.

                          This will prevent runout and aid in adding the paddle later.



                          Next is to trim the hub end of the spoke. Notice the line intersecting the hub, this is the cut line for the spoke. I did this freehand and it has to be accurate or your rim will have gaps, its actually easy after you butcher a few of the spokes. After the cut is made I sanded the taper off and glued the spoke to the drawing with two tiny spots of glue. I also added a spot of glue to the hub where the mitre meets the square cut for additional strength. I tried several different approaches to this angle and this works the best. It may not be a standard way of doing the spokes but its strong after the washers are added over the top. Its also covered by the washer. The washers are a # 10 standard from a hardware store. I did file them down to 1 1/2" thick as they were way to thick I suppose. The axel is from a 1/4" wood dowell rod.



                          The rest is piece work.










                          Next up will be the steel hoop construction etc.

                          Philip

                          Philip

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:


                            Originally posted by grlakeslogger


                            Philip,

                            Great start! Looking good so far. When you shoot some more photo could you please pose a scale figure near the boat? It is hard to gain a perspective on these sorts of things with no reference point. Boats and boilers did come in all sizes.

                            Looking forward to more.

                            --Stu--


                            Sure thing Stu! Project is o-scale.




                            Philip

                            Cliff Powers sternwheeler if your really motivated. Check it out.

                            http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/t...61&whichpage=1
                            Philip

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I was doing some research on logging in the Big River area of California a couple of years ago and came across a picture of the S.S.Maru. I later found the picture of the #2 Maru that showed the chain system to used to power the paddle wheel. I assumed that the same set-up was used to power the #1 Maru.

                              1. Big River Maru # 1. 1900 - 1919.



                              2. Big River Maru #2. 1919 - 1938.



                              3. Photo Interpolation. At one time I had worked out a set of measurements but then I found a reference to the real measurements. I just deleted my measurements as they were wrong. I then made the card stock mock-up.



                              4. Card Stock Model - Mock-up Maru #1.



                              5. Card Stock Model - Mock-up Maru #1.



                              6. Card Stock Model - Mock-up Maru #1.



                              I like the work you have done on your model. The Paddle Wheel "How To" is really well done.

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