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Diorama finishing – keep from having the wet look

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  • Diorama finishing – keep from having the wet look

    I wanted to know what tricks are used to keep from having scenery look like it’s when you glue the scenery materials like grass and dirt. I’ve found that the scene looks like it just rained but I was hoping to get the scene to look like a dry summer day. Anyone have tips or would like to share how they’ve overcome this problem I would love to hear about it.

    Thanks,

    Dave

  • #2
    What are you using to glue the scenic stuff down with? I find using white glue with 4-5 parts water added shops any shine in the glue when sticking down ground foam.

    To glue down dirt without it keeping the darker/wetter colour when it dries I have success if I brush on diluted glue quite sparingly and dust on the sifted dirt until the glue doesn't soak up through it. Leave it to dry and then brush off the excess and the top surface of the dirt should keep the lighter colour.
    Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

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    • #3
      I'm using white glue with water to but I may need to add more water and keep the surface dry when I glue the scenery down. I have noticed I can brush on some powders after it's all dry and that will help keep a dry look. I wanted to hear from other and what they do as I wanted to have options to try.

      Thanks,

      Dave

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      • #4
        I rub earth tone sanded grout onto the roads and sprinkle some over the scenic material to create an uneven earthy look. Then lightly spritz with wet water.
        Chris Lyon

        http://www.lyonvalleynorthern.blogspot.com

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        • #5
          I often rub pastels over the "hard" parts of the scenery and then use a finger to set it well into the pre-existing material. I may then add alcohol to help maintain the fine powder.

          I also use the method mentionned by Neil, adding more scenic stuff to the wet area until it covers the glue.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the ideas guys. Here is a link to the post I have photos of what I'm doing that lead me to this question.

            http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/t...TOPIC_ID=21516

            Dave

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            • #7
              Dave, I think that overall, all your colors are a bit too dark in the scene on the other topic. You might consider lighting the road with a mix of white and yellow (yellow for a hotter color). I'm sure that if you follow the advice above, you'll be able to get your scenery as you wish.

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              • #8
                I'd agree with Frederic. Tarmac roads are not as dark as that expect when they are very new. Dust gets rubbed into them very quickly by passing traffic and it lightens the colour a lot.

                What is your dirt lot made from? The texture looks too coarse and uniform to represent scale dirt and it is too dark. I sift dry sandy clay (not topsoil, the stuff under that and on the verges of roads) through nylon tights to get the finer particles. It gives a nice pale yellow-brown colour.

                Your sidewalks are perfect
                Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

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