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Mann's Creek hopper, ITS ALIVE!!!!!

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  • #46
    quote:


    Originally posted by Coaltrain


    I have tried tapping the bubbles out but I like to use a backer sheet of plastic so I get a flat back on the castings and so they are all the same thickness, trouble is that it traps the bubbles in the mold. If I used a vacuum chamber I could deair the castings and the add the backer, or I am sure that the vacuum will pull air out from under the backer. I would sure like to know how some of the other resin casting model product sellers do it.


    I was given some help when I posted my thread on molding cars. I was told to use the backer sheet of clear plastic so you can see the bubbles and then inject extra resin into the bubble areas with a syringe placed between the mold and the plastic. I was never able to figure out how to do this before my resin cured.

    Good luck,

    Larry

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    • #47
      yes please, let me know if you do go into production i can sure use some in On30
      On30 Dave

      seen on G+, YOUTUBE and FB

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      • #48
        There's a very good booklet from Smooth-On thats costs $3.00 on moulding techniques.

        http://www.smooth-on.com/.

        The Workshop that I did the casting material was vaccumed for approx 2mins before use. Obviously this varies between materials. The vacume consists of a pot say 1.5 times the size of a pressure cooker it had a heavy glass lid, and a vacume motor to reduce the air bubbles. Have you thought about using Smooth Cast 320 rasin with a brown tint ?. If your intrested I could scan the tech page and send it as a PDF. I can't claim to be an expert on resin casting

        but it look like controlled evacuation is the way to go to reduce air bubbles.

        Rich

        BTW the hoppers look teriffic


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        • #49
          quote:


          Originally posted by MMaD


          There's a very good booklet from Smooth-On thats costs $3.00 on moulding techniques.

          http://www.smooth-on.com/.

          The Workshop that I did the casting material was vaccumed for approx 2mins before use. Obviously this varies between materials. The vacume consists of a pot say 1.5 times the size of a pressure cooker it had a heavy glass lid, and a vacume motor to reduce the air bubbles. Have you thought about using Smooth Cast 320 rasin with a brown tint ?. If your intrested I could scan the tech page and send it as a PDF. I can't claim to be an expert on resin casting

          but it look like controlled evacuation is the way to go to reduce air bubbles.

          Rich

          BTW the hoppers look teriffic




          Thanks, I would be interested in seeing that spec sheet.

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          • #50
            I reviewed casting resins with a friend of mine that works at Disney .Here is some basic information : There are endless varieties of resins ,each with its own characteristics and each having its own way of removing air bubbles . Here are some of ways to remove the air : pulling a vacuum(almost a complete vacuum, 28” ) for it to brake before pouring . Pressurizing before poring . Lightly passing a torch flame across the resign after it’s been poured ,and spraying a misting pass of urethane reducer after it has been poured . With higher grades of resin you are likely to have less porosity problems . The faster cure resins are more likly to have porosity problems . You should also get a tech sheet with the product you are using that tells you the best way to minimize this problem.

            I hope this helps .

            Little Dave

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            • #51
              I was thinking that the rapid cure resins might be the problem. I am going to do some research to some other resins that I have been pointed to. If I get somehting that works I would be more interested in producing kits in the future.

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              • #52
                Well I now have five of the plan ten car fleet finished. After these five I am taking a break and building some locomotives, then I will finish up the other five cars.

                Of these five cars three are all wood and two are resin with real wood planks on the sides. The first car I built I scratch built the door hinges, for the other four I discovered that Grant line O scale engine house door hinges look really close and they already have the bolts cast on, which eliminates 80 NBW castings that I had to put on, don't worry there are still plenty to add to the car even after I use the Grant Line hinges. The Grant Line hinges need a slight modification but they still save plenty of time.

                Here are some photos of the cars. I still have not decided what to do for car numbering, I would like to not have to use decals but I am not sure how to paint them on and make them look good, I don't think my hands are that steady.

















                So far every car is a little different than each other in their details. One car represents the as built cars with a wood floor and only the corner steel braces. Some cars have a few steel bracing added while two have a lot of steel bracing. One car I built from a photo in the Mann's Creek book that shows the end diagonal bracing to be upside down and two diagonal braces on one side missing.

                here is a close up of a truck to show the weathering. I am using acrylic paint which I brush paint on, while the paint is still wet I dab on Bragdon weather powder to give it texture. The wheels are Polly scale oily black with black powder brushed into the wet paint to make a greasy paste which represents the oil and dust that is found on the surface of wheels that used friction bearings. The trucks are San Juan Car company trucks


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                • #53
                  Great looking fleet of cars, I am impressed.

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                  • #54
                    Just superb. Well done. I wish I had the ability to do something like this.

                    Arthur
                    Arthur

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                    • #55
                      Beautiful job...I love my Manns Creek book and these hoppers bring the pages to life!...looking forward to seeing what you do with the locomotives....tom

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                      • #56
                        Great looking cars! I don't think decals will work too well on wood, have you considered dry transfers?

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                        • #57
                          Hand lettering is not as difficult as you might think! You have to have two brushes... one with the lettering color and one with the car base color for corrections. Acrylics dry fast and are easy to correct. Load the brush with quite thick paint and roll the point gently on a piece of paper to get a fine paint point... Try it on a piece of wood or paper and have fun.
                          Troels Kirk

                          Näsum, Sweden

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                          • #58
                            Jeff-

                            I would be very nervous about attempting to hand letter such beautiful models. I use a fine tipped brush to paint numbers on my rolling stock using a stencil



                            It yields a sufficiently rough looking job to look hand done, yet is still legible. Card stock stencils can be cut by anyone providing laser cutting services. You would just have to give them the art in the file format they prefer.

                            Mark

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                            • #59
                              It's really a great fleet. I love watching them.

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                              • #60
                                thanks everyone. I am going to try and shoot some video of them unloading and post it here soon, I just have to set up a test track long enough for five hoppers on each side of an unloading area.

                                I did mess around with hand lettering a little but maybe I will give it a try your way Kirk.

                                The other idea I did have was to try and find someone to make laser stencils, any body know anyone that does them?

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