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  • JerryB
    replied
    Tearing down a good layout is always a big decision to make. In my 50+ years of model railroading I have torn down many layouts because I've moved, changed era, prototype, scale, or this time gauge (I was in O gauge now On30).

    I've always found after doing it the fun of building a new layout was always worth it.

    Remember nothing is forever in model railroading.

    Jerry

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  • dougcoffey1950
    replied
    Coaltrain,

    I know exactly where you are coming from. Driven by passion to build or dead in the water. It is the journey that is the thrill, not the destination.

    You are a builder. (grin)

    Leave a comment:


  • quarryman
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by Coaltrain



    I started tinkering with the On30 stuff it has renewed my modeling interest,


    Your HO scale layout is very impressive. It shows you understand the operation of coal branches and so forth because it spans and includes all the important elements. I think you might try a different approach when you consider On30. Instead of having a priority on including all the operational aspects, just think about cool rural and small industrial scenes that include a railroad. The priority is on the setting, not on the railroad itself. A great example of thinking this way is Troel Kirk's thread on his Coast Line RR. He is making the railroad fit into his scenes, rather than the other way around.

    You know enough about operations to make sure that the trackplan you end up with is operationally viable ... you will have round around tracks where you need them, you will have practical track arrangements at online industries. But don't discount possible settings that don't include a wide scope of operational possibilities ... a small locomotive pulling or pushing a few cars through well modeled scenes is all the operation you need ... easily operated solo or with 1 or 2 others.

    It's just a different way of looking at it.

    Mark

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  • CieloVistaRy
    replied
    Coal Train,

    Well the benefit of building in modules is that you can move it, so if you build a layout and get bored with it, you can sell it and move it out easily, then start on a new one.

    This actually sounds like you could make a career out of building custom made layouts for other people, since it is the building that gives you the most joy.

    Arthur

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  • Coaltrain
    replied
    One of my biggest problems is that there are a lot of different railroads I would not mind modeling. With that, every time I have to move or tear down a layout I kind of get excited in a weird way because I get to try something else for a while.

    I have never "finished" a layout before this one so I never knew what it would be like to have one finished, now I know and it is like the hobby just ended for me. I have been moping around the house for a while now and since I started tinkering with the On30 stuff it has renewed my modeling interest, even my wife noticed that I was happier lately (which she said it must be becuase I am building models again). I need to build with a purpose, it drives me like a fuel, having a complete layout means that I am just looking for stuff to do that I don't really need and I have no fire to do anything. The biggest thrill for me was to have a scene in my head and bring it to life on the layout.

    I also found out that I am not the type of person to hold operating sessions at my house. I don't mind having a friend over to run trains but I don't like having to get a group of people scheduled, set up the layout, and host an operating session. However, I do think a layout I build needs to have the ability to be operated in some form for at least one or two people. So my next layout will be designed to be able to be operated with 1-2 people. I know that sounds strange because any layout can be operated with one person, but that is not exactly true. Take my current layout, if I want to go run a train I really can't because it messes up the operating schedule to move a train out of order, most trains on my layout must interact with another train to do their jobs, if one train gets moved things get out of whack. Also, if I want to run a train it sometimes means running a train out of staging, sorting its cars, getting a branch line locomotive out of the terminal, build a trains with cars from the train that was in staging plus what is in the yard and then I can finally run it. Sounds like fun but all of that initial operation just to get a train to run on the branch can take a lot of time and by then I am done and I have not really even run the train. Don't get me wrong, I used to like that, that is how I designed the layout, but I have done that now for 9 years and now I want to do something different. I miss no having a loop of track to just let stuff run, the next layout I do will not only operate but have some kind of running loop for those nights when I just want to see something run aournd for a while.

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  • CieloVistaRy
    replied
    Well either way, your tremendous talents will be an asset to the dark side of on30 and please do entertain the idea of building your new layout in modules.. that way it can be transported when/if you move.

    Arthur

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  • Dashman
    replied
    Coaltrain- WOW! I'd be hard pressed to take that one apart. That said, it's always fun & challenging to try something new.

    I moved to the "darkside" of On30. I had modeled HO contemporary era; sold everything (28 engines, 450+ cars) including vehicles and what structures I could salvage- on eBay and my local swapmeet. Didn't do too badly -[:-piggy] but the benefits, real fun and savings have come from numerous angles:

    1) bigger scale= easier for 56 year old eyes & fingers dealing with neuritis.

    2) bigger scale- more room for detail.

    3) Focus: I went from the roster mentioned (with at least "one of everything") to 8 engines, 80 cars- to model "mainline narrow gauge" in 1953 Colorado.

    4) Now that I'm moving residences, I will be able to either keep that theme, or have a smaller layout- using the same equipment. No downsizing to 4-axle diesels & 40' cars, etc. as I would have done in HO.

    Take many pictures of the old layout for the fond memories [:-brokenheart], and go for it ! And then include pics for all of us

    Leave a comment:


  • Coaltrain
    replied
    I don't know if I could get it out of that room in pieces. there is only one section that is removable and that is the yard section.

    the big problem is the backdrop, it is part of the wall.

    I have a friend that said he would be willing to take it, but like I said, I am not sure it could be taken down and saved.

    Leave a comment:


  • CieloVistaRy
    replied
    Also, I myself don't have very much space and I am only working on one 3 x 6 module for now, albeit very slowly.

    Arthur

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  • CieloVistaRy
    replied
    Coaltrain,

    You could try selling it on ebay.. you would get money for it and you'd know that it exists somewhere and that someone is enjoying it, at the very least...

    Not sure if you build your layout as a standalone or if it is attached to the walls, but maybe there is a way to divide it up so you can ship it out of there or it could be picked up.

    Arthur

    Leave a comment:


  • Coaltrain
    replied
    thanks for some reason. I am going to start with a small module to test some scenery and structure modeling to see if I like it. If I did make the switch it will be a while.

    My layout will be 10 years old this fall. It has been fun but there really is nothing to do on it. I have all the structures done, the scenery is done, I have all the locomotives I need and more than enough freight cars. I have rebuild some scenes already, changed the engine terminal, replaces structures, replaces freight cars with better ones. Now all there is to do is up keep.

    There have been many layouts larger than mine that the owners took down so they can do something different, some are rather well known. I would love to keep the layout and just build a new one some place else but layouts don't lend to being able to "collect" them, unless I had a lot more money and space.

    Leave a comment:


  • DHM
    replied
    Or Costa Rica...3 1/2 foot gauge...point to point, no turning facilites, just run arounds on either end...arch bar trucks on the yellow caboose..old coaches, EMD G8 (?)

    This was February 2008. Everyone else on the train was hot(no air conditioning...) and "sea sick" (The track could have used some work) but I was like a kid in the candy store...





    Don Miller

    Leave a comment:


  • quarryman
    replied
    Interesting operations:

    http://www.rypn.org/RyPN/articles/vi...1114020646.txt

    A big headlight centered on the front of the smokebox is the stereotype in my mind of Mexican steam. The B-Mann outside frame 2-8-0 has always looked "Mexican" to me.

    I would also suggest building a module or switching layout first, but logic doesn't have anything to do with it. Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.

    Mark

    Leave a comment:


  • BigLars
    replied
    quote:


    Originally posted by Tommatthews


    Larry,

    Is this the link you were thinking of ..

    http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/t...TOPIC_ID=22912

    Haiti ... but certaining excellant food for thought ...


    No wonder I could not find the thread, I had the wrong country :erm: :erm:

    Thanks Tom

    Leave a comment:


  • Frederic_Testard
    replied
    Coaltrain,

    It's always a tough decision to dismantle something like a layout. There are many hours there, probably a lot of achievements (clearly, there are on your great layout). I've just done this with my partly done Sn3 layout, and despite the fact that it was by far less finished than yours, it took me almost three years to really decide myself to do it.

    I think you should in a first time either follow Larry's or Arthur's advice. Build something new but not destroy what you have. Then you'll have a better idea of whether you're really crazy or not.

    Leave a comment:

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