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In the UK, which side of the loco ...

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  • In the UK, which side of the loco ...

    does the engineer (is it called "train driver" across the pond?) sit on? I'd like to model 1870s - 1890s UK (though I'm not sure if I have the skills, what with the lack of RTR equipment), so if it has changed over the years, that info would be helpful.

    Thanks.

    - Harry

  • #2
    Harry ,

    I would guess the right hand side . Just like our cars .

    No doubt someone more knowledgeable will correct me if I'm wrong .


    NickO

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    • #3
      No, sorry Nick, you're wrong

      The trains run on the left here (same as the cars) so the driver is on the left and the fireman on the right.

      For the 1870s - 1890s you'll need to built some kits but it can be done. A lot of the locos are very small - smaller than in the US. The wagons and coaches are also smaller than in the US.

      Narrow gauge is a bit less common here. Most of the narrow gauge lines are industrial except for the welsh and northern irish narrow railways, which are very pretty
      Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

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      • #4
        Oh well , I had a 50% chance of being right . Shows how much attention I pay to things like that ,

        NickO

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        • #5
          Well this was an interesting question... the first thought that came to my mind was the idea that since auto drivers drive on the opposite side over there, then presumably the Engineer- ahem- the driver, would do the same..

          Arthur
          Arthur

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          • #6
            quote:


            Originally posted by Neil M


            No, sorry Nick, you're wrong

            The trains run on the left here (same as the cars) so the driver is on the left and the fireman on the right.


            not quite correct I'm afraid. The Great Western Railway had the driver situated on the right hand side since the company began right the way through to the end of steam in the UK (1968). Quite a few LMS engines were right hand drive too which caused problems when sighting signalling.

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            • #7
              Hi Harry

              If you want to model UK railways in the period you stated then most locomotives would have been righthand drive, that is if you were on the footplate the 'Engine driver' would be on the righthand side looking forward towards the chimney. On after the Grouping in 1923 did new locomotives of the LMS; LNERand the Southern build locomotives that were lefthand drive, the GWR stuck to righthand drive right through to Nationalisation in 1948 and all BR built locomotives were lefthand drive. I was a fireman on the LMS later London Midland division of BR from 1957 until end of steam in 1968.

              If you want ant more UK info please contact me.

              Happy modelling

              Howard

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              • #8
                quote:


                Originally posted by Nobby Clarke


                Hi Harry

                If you want to model UK railways in the period you stated then most locomotives would have been righthand drive, that is if you were on the footplate the 'Engine driver' would be on the righthand side looking forward towards the chimney. On after the Grouping in 1923 did new locomotives of the LMS; LNERand the Southern build locomotives that were lefthand drive, the GWR stuck to righthand drive right through to Nationalisation in 1948 and all BR built locomotives were lefthand drive. I was a fireman on the LMS later London Midland division of BR from 1957 until end of steam in 1968.

                If you want ant more UK info please contact me.

                Happy modelling

                Howard


                Very interesting.. was there a reason for this? I can only imagine how much work they had to do in terms of switching over all the signals, as well as the signs.

                Arthur
                Arthur

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                • #9
                  Thanks for the info guys. Very helpful.

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                  • #10
                    Hi Arthur

                    Problems with many different styles of signals became a problem when at the Grouping in 1923 when a lot of Companies formed the 'Big Four' A lot of the old signals were outdated and classed as unsafe.

                    The Great Western remained unchanged and stuck to its lower quadrant signals mostly sited on the righthand side of the tracks. The other three of the 'Big Four' - LMS; LNER & Southern adapted to change all signals to a common style upper quadrant semiphore signalling of all metal contruction of tubular steel posts with pressed steel signal arms, plus or minus a few variants mostly on the Southern who used a lot of concrete and old bullhead rail for posts. All new and replacement signals were sited on the lefthand side as we drive on the left, these signals were in turn replaced by three aspect colour lights and as trains got faster and required greater braking distances the thrre aspect gave way to four aspect we use today.

                    Hope this helps

                    Howard

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                    • #11
                      Very interesting historical tidbit.

                      Many thanks,

                      Arthur
                      Arthur

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                      • #12
                        nobby clarke, why does that name ring a bell??

                        southshore group mean anything to you???

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                        • #13
                          Sorry there

                          Nobby is a common nickname here in the UK for anyone with a Clarke surname.

                          Never heard of South Shore

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