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  • Paint Primer for Plastic and Resin Kits

    What are your thoughts about primer paint:

    paints made for models ( Testors and Model Master) vs. hardware store primers ( Krylon and Trimclad, etc.)
    Tom M.

  • #2
    Tom - I have had the best success with the Krylon primers from Wal*Mart. Years ago, I used the others, but always managed to get runs. I think there is less overspray with krylon paints.

    JMO - Geezer

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    • #3
      Tom,

      I like Model Masters, and you ask why, well I like the grain of the paint, the gray I use is light, so that the over colors work well, like the yellows and reds. I use it for wood, styrene, resins and metals. I use the small cans because that way they are fresh. The paint doesn't hide the detail. For me its not a cost issue or smell, as I paint in the airbrush booth. I usually paint in 2 light coats, rather than one, and bone dry inbetween.

      I use the same gray on wood, to simulate the aged wood, with stains over.

      Since I don't use craft paints I can't relate how that works over my primer. BTW, I don't prime in flat black, even on engines.

      Les

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      • #4
        One reason I post this question is that Testors and Model Master are not available locally.

        I am in Edmonton next week so I think I'll wait and buy Testors or Model Master there.

        The Dunkirk and the stock car can wait until then.

        I am still interested if Model Master or Testors is finer / lighter than the others; they do not fill in the factory simulate wood grain.
        Tom M.

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        • #5
          MY favorite has been Floquil Foundation for many years. It's a nice light tan color, and takes lighter color real good. When I paint scale figures, this paint color is perfect for caucasian skin.

          Based on recommedations on this forum, I've started tryingo out the $2.00 spray can primer from Wal-Mart, and I like it too, especially for larger items. The can says it dries in 10 minutes, but I still leave it overnight. I spray in a booth, and there is a lot of overspray when using the aersol cans. No cleanup of the airbrush too!

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          • #6
            What is the exact name of this spray can primer from wal-mart, please?

            Thanks,

            Arthur
            Arthur

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            • #7
              From an old time modeler, I always primes my models with an air gun and Model Masters Light Gull Gray paint. Works like a charm.

              Peter [:-kitty]

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              • #8
                quote:


                Originally posted by Tommatthews


                I am still interested if Model Master or Testors is finer / lighter than the others; they do not fill in the factory simulate wood grain.



                Hi Tom --

                For a long time, my favorite was the good ole Krylon Primer ... BUT ... they've recently made a change. Most of the cans are now fitted with an "EZ TOUCH 360* DIAL" (360 degree) ... probably a great improvement for GENERAL spray painting ... but a real pain when it comes to painting models ... it puts out a big FAN of paint that's too big for our use.

                So, I tried another alternative from Wal-Mart recently (Arthur, this one is a WM item):

                -- Rust-Oleum Automobile Primer (small print on UPC label says "2081 Light Gray Primer")

                -- This one worked as well as the "old" cans of Krylon; color is a little lighter, but dries quickly.

                Some other thoughts (I've done a lot of spray-can painting!):

                -- Testor's primer is good, but dries slower than others.

                -- Model Master primer is similar to above.

                -- Model Master paints are excellent! Colors are mostly flat (look for "FS" on label)

                -- Tamiya spray paints are also excellent. There's a system for marking which ones are flat finish ... but I forget what the code is! I'd gamble on trying their primer too.

                -- Generic ultra-cheap spray paints are hit-or-miss in quality of pigment/solvents. If you're new to spray-can painting, stick with the good stuff to develop technique ... then experiment with cheapo's to find ones you like.

                -- Floquil paints applied over a good primer will work ... Floquil paints applied directly to resin may cause problems. (Their solvents dry slowly -- something funny happens there.)

                [:-bulb][:-bulb][:-bulb] MOST IMPORTANT TIP and then I'll shut up!

                -- Use LIGHT coats of spray primer!

                -- Do NOT try to get an opaque coat on the first or second pass ... build up with several light coats to get a good finish and good bond without filling in the detail.

                :crazy: So how's that for a long-winded answer! :crazy:

                Condensed version: Rustoleum primer, light coats, top with Model Master or other favorite paints including acrylics, washes, etc. Have fun![:-party]
                Cheers,

                Dallas



                Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build

                Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor! []

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                • #9
                  I've been "converted" to using Wal Mart's store brand primer (I think it is "Color Place"), because it has no filler - it doesn't hide detail. And here it's only about a buck a can, too. It comes in white, gray, and I think a "primer red" color.

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                  • #10
                    Just checked, my Wallyworld stuff is "Colour Place" - different spelling here in Canada! Jeese, a can of this is $2.00, think a one ounce bottle of Floquil is around $5.00 locally.

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                    • #11
                      I have used " Rustoleum" - rust and it was nice.

                      I can purchase it locally. It will take acrylics washes over it.
                      Tom M.

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                      • #12
                        Excellent answers.. Tom thanks for bringing this topic up. It was something I hadn't thought about before, but now will be saving money and using good stuff.

                        Dallas, thanks for your tips.. much appreciated.. and please do not "shut up" your expertise is much valued here.

                        Arthur
                        Arthur

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                        • #13
                          Dallas - Always welcome tips & info from you.....

                          **-- Floquil paints applied over a good primer will work ... Floquil paints applied directly to resin may cause problems. (Their solvents dry slowly -- something funny happens there.)

                          Been there done that.....ruined a finished kit because I didnt wash it and applied Floquil over a primer base....after a month, you could still wipe off the paint....Learned a good one there....

                          Geezer

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                          • #14
                            quote:


                            Originally posted by CieloVistaRy


                            Dallas, thanks for your tips.. much appreciated.. and please do not "shut up" your expertise is much valued here. Arthur


                            Hi Arthur --

                            Well, I think I have enough "babble" in me to preclude completely shutting up!

                            Here's a painting thread from the Gn15 Gnatterbox that may prove interesting for the project(s) on hand:

                            http://forum.gn15.info/viewtopic.php?t=4152

                            And my own take on those techniques on a Gn15 railtruck bash that I have yet to finish [8][:-dunce]:

                            http://forum.gn15.info/viewtopic.php?t=4412

                            Look at page 2 and 3 for "progress" shots on the wood painting.

                            Definitely applicable to On30 ... and the siding on my rail truck is distressed styrene ... so these techniques may also work on the San Juan stock car mentioned in another thread.

                            Kudos to Steve Bennett for the techniques in the first thread. I picked up a set of artist gouache poster paints at Michael's craft shop for some ridiculously low price ... stuff works great, and you can wash off the finish until you get to the point where you like it ... then set in place. Tamiya flat clear coat is a good choice to seal. I'm liking that better than Testor's or Krylon dull coats at this point.

                            See ... complete failure to shut up! 8D [:-bigmouth] 8D

                            Cheers,

                            Dallas



                            Chambers Gas & Oil -- structure build

                            Quality craftsmanship with a sense of humor! []

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Dallas - Thanks for the links and the tips on the poster paints...I will have to try that!

                              The railtruck is really kool, and I lmao at the "sink"........All the best, Geezer

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