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Lou's Flag Making _ How-to

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  • Lou's Flag Making _ How-to

    Flag making is no easy solution. I will describe here my approach for an HO 1/87th; this one is based on an old technique I came across from another modeler, involving the use of kleenex tissue as the base material. This old procedure involved drawing the pattern on the kleenex and then carefully painting the flag with water colors or acrylics. I will describe a method whereby the pattern and colors are applied by means of your Computer and ink jet Printer.

    First find the flag you want in a book or on the internet, or draw your own image on illustration board. Scan the flag into your computer and reshape it to the desired size. I made mine a scale 3’ x 5’ Flag. I will be doing the U.S. Flag as my project for this how-to. Next, print the flag on an ordinary 8-1/2 by 11 piece of paper using your color ink jet printer.





    Next, separate the two plys of kleenex and select an area that is smooth and free of defects. Cut a piece of the kleenex a little larger than the flag will be. Place the kleenex over the flag printed in last step/picture. Carefully paste the edges of the kleenex to the paper, covering the area where the flag was printed. Be careful not to get paste on any part of the kleenex that will eventually be the flag. I used highly diluted Elmers glue with water to stick the tissue down to the paper using a paint brush. After the glue has dried, print another copy of the flag using this same sheet of paper run through the printer again. This time the flag will be printed on the Kleenex tissue.





    After the ink has dried thoroughly, cut the kleenex flag out. You will find that the ink has completely penetrated through the kleenex, and the flag will be shown on both sides of the Kleenex tissue. (You can even see the stars). I used a 48 star flag as I model the 30’s thru 50’s railroading era.





    I will be using a wooden dowel a scale 20’ long for the flag pole, a round headed pin for the top of the flag pole and white sewing thread for the flag rope line. You can use wire or plastic for your pole if you wish.



    Next, super glue the flag on to the thread and make up your flag pole. I used acrylic antique white paint for the pole, and silver for the top ball and rope cleat that I made from a common sewing pin. I used the rivet from a leather working snap for the flag base.





    A few pictures of the completed flag and pole. The last picture shows the flag formed/shaped with some waves, and stiffened by spraying with testors dull coat, or you can use a similar material, to protect the colors and shape of the flag.





    This method will work for a wide range of sizes, and for intricate patterns. For all types of flags, it solves the problem of painting stripes with straight edges and making small stars on a blue background. The type of flags you can make is endless. You find the flag, if you can print it, then you can make it. I hope you enjoyed once again another Lou’s How-to. :up:




    Louis
    Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

  • #2
    Learn something new everyday, I woulda thought the printer would destroy the Kleenex. Nice looking flag and pole Louis!

    Comment


    • #3
      Lou,

      Outstanding!
      Bruce

      Comment


      • #4
        quote:


        Originally posted by Tyson Rayles


        Learn something new everyday, I woulda thought the printer would destroy the Kleenex. Nice looking flag and pole Louis!


        Thank you Tyson. I was kind of leary about running it through my printer when I tried it, I held my breath, but it works fine. Madkes for a nice job I think. Thanks again.


        Louis
        Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:


          Originally posted by Dutchman


          Lou,

          Outstanding!


          As always, you're right there. Thanks for the comment Bruce. [:-cowboy] :up:

          Always a lot of on lookers, but noone says hey! :erm:


          Louis
          Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

          Comment


          • #6
            I’ve done a few flags using computer paper glued back to back. I like your method much better, Louis.

            George
            The sky is not my limit, it's my playground.

            Comment


            • #7
              quote:


              Originally posted by George D


              I’ve done a few flags using computer paper glued back to back. I like your method much better, Louis.

              George


              Thanks George. The way you are doing it, is the same way I was as well until I came upon this idea. I tried painting the kleenex at one time, but couldn't keep it from ripping while painting. Thanks again for your comment!


              Louis
              Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

              Comment


              • #8
                This is really an interesting - and creative - way to make a flag (and it should work with those for other countries... ).

                One thing is not clear for me though. Since, when you run the kleenex sheet into the printer, ink penetrates the sheet and appears on both sides, what's the reason for pre-printing the flag first?

                Comment


                • #9
                  That was excellent.

                  Regards,

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Amazin!!! Beautiful how-to & beautiful job!!! Well done Lou!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      A very nice idea. It's a shame it wouldn't work on my laser printer.

                      Frederic - I assume Louis prints the flag on the sheet of paper before the tissue is stuck down so he knows exactly where the printer will print the real one so he doesn't get glue where the flag will be printed?
                      Built a waterfront HO layout in Ireland http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=22161 but now making a start in On30 in Australia http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=52273

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        quote:


                        Originally posted by Frederic Testard


                        This is really an interesting - and creative - way to make a flag (and it should work with those for other countries... ).

                        One thing is not clear for me though. Since, when you run the kleenex sheet into the printer, ink penetrates the sheet and appears on both sides, what's the reason for pre-printing the flag first?


                        Thanks Frederic for your comments.
                        The flag is pre-printed on the paper first only so you can see where it will line up, so that you can cover around that area only with the tissue paper and glue. Then when you run the paper through the printer again it will line up onto the tissue inside of the glued area.


                        Louis
                        Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:


                          Originally posted by rfmicro


                          That was excellent.

                          Regards,


                          Thanks Trent. glad you liked this one! :up:


                          Louis
                          Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            quote:


                            Originally posted by Geezer


                            Amazin!!! Beautiful how-to & beautiful job!!! Well done Lou!


                            Thanks very much Geezer, your comments are always welcomed! :up:


                            Louis
                            Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Thanks for the kind way you answered my question, Neil and Louis. After reading the answer, I just wondered how I could not have thought of it by myself... [:-spin]

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