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The Sn3 Lake Itasca Railway and Navigation Company

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  • Thanks for the nice comments, Tyson, Evan and Rick.

    quote:


    The bottom of the modules, was that added strictly for strength?

    I would think that doing that might increase the sound created by the trains since it's built similar to a stringed instrument.


    You see, Rick, I firmly keep my promise. Only new mistakes... Well, I'll have a loco run as soon as trackwork is complete, and see how noisy the thing is...

    Well, in fact, I think you were lead to think that there's a bottom on the entire modules because of the boards of plywood one sees under the 'holes' in the track. In fact, the remainder is open, so I don't think this resonance thing should really happen.
    quote:


    Also, I'm wondering why you are using a sub-road bed?

    Is it for sound insulation related to what I said above?

    I would think being a backwoods scene that the rail would be built directly on the ground.


    It's not real railroad subroadbed, in fact. On the right side the ground will have a gentle slope from track level to the module level. And on the other side, the relief will also start at track level. But the subroadbed helps me drive solidly the spikes, and provides an easily cut space for the magnetic uncouplers.

    Comment


    • Frederic,

      Just checked back here too. Your layout is coming right along and is VERY impressive! Wow!!!

      Tom Johnson

      Comment


      • Thanks for the comments, my friends.

        As I mentionned yesterday, the first pieces of tracks were coincidentally laid the exact day of S scale (3 / 16). I made a small movie with my PBL C18 running along this short piece of track. Despite a few DCC problems I'll describe later, I was able to shoot some pleasant images :

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bUuAcoYeidc

        Comment


        • Hey Frederic, keep up laying those rails, you have more trackage in that one spot than I have in total.

          Mark
          W,L,&E

          Comment


          • Frederic,

            Thanks for taking the time to post your latest progress and your thought process. I find it very interesting how new ideas can change our original design. Also that is on great looking locomotive that is in the video, I bet it was a great feeling seeing it finally run on some track.
            Ron Newby

            General Manager

            Clearwater Valley Railway Co.

            http://cvry.ca

            Comment


            • Frederic,

              That is an excellent locomotive. I know you must be so pleased that it runs so slow. I only wish the on30 equipment could even be as slow as it is.

              Arthur
              Arthur

              Comment


              • A small step, but still you are on the roll! Congratulations! And what a lovely loco... what brand is the sound chip?

                Arthur, one of my inside frame americans runs almost as slowly as this, I believe... and the Forney's are not far off either.
                Troels Kirk

                Näsum, Sweden

                Comment


                • Frederic,

                  Would your new modules shown earlier in this thread be hanging on the wall, or would they rest on legs or on top of shelves ?

                  I am wondering how you will access under the tracks to make the electrical connections or repairs.

                  Nevertheless, this looks promising and I think it is a great idea to put a pile driver working on a never ending construction of a bridge
                  Bruno



                  COHS Member - http://www.cohs.org/

                  CNRHS Member - http://www.cnlines.ca/

                  Comment


                  • The comment is really interesting and it made me think, Bruno.

                    The modules will rest on top of homemade shelves. I had already planned to add a number of holes for visit in the sides of the modules, but I might add more (or larger). These holes will eventually be covered by removable fascia made out of 3mm thick medium. I had planned to have relatively long pieces of fascia, but I'll probably make them shorter to help removability.

                    In the same way, I think I will slightly modify the front relief of the ex-Vance Junction area so as to have a better under access to the wiring, since this is probably the place where the modules fit the shelves in the tightest way.

                    Today progress : the beginning of the installation of the first turnout. It would have gone faster if the tortoise piano wire hadn't been to short to reach the mobile tie (...), which forces me to wait until I find some wire to install the tortoise in its final position... Maybe tomorrow.

                    Comment


                    • A short progress report.

                      I was able to locate some 1mm diamater (0.40") piano wire. It is extremely strong (and hard to cut, but don't worry, I know it must not be done with the fragile rail cutters). So I was able to install the tortoise and complete the wiring (except that I forgot to add wires for the leds indicating in which direction the turnout is set, so I'll have to delicately unscrew two connectors - we call them dominos in France, there is metal inside, plastic around and two screws are used to hold together the wires to be joined - and all two small wires for the leds. I suppose I am not wrong if I connect a resistor to one of the wires and in an opposite manner one leg of each led to the resistor and the other to the other wire. This way when the current is in one direction one led is lit and the other isn't and it becomes the opposite when you change the current direction.

                      I'm always glad to read advice as far as it concerns electricity.

                      Not that all these technicalities are really necessary since the turnout is about 2" away from the operator side of the module so that it is very easy to see where it leads, but I told to myself that it would train me...

                      About 18" before the turnout is a small bridge. To make it, I kitbashed one of the scratchbuilt bridges of a previous diorama, unspiked the rails, removed the ties in excess (the new bridge is shorter) and cut the stringers to fit in the new space. Then new ties were added (with an angle since the gap spanned by the bridge is really not square), replaced the old ties that had been too badly damaged during the unspiking process, and I had a bridge relatively fast. Then I built two wooden abutments, and glue is currently setting to hold them (at least I hope...).

                      I should be able to shoot this progress tomorrow. Apart from spiking the rails, I will then only have to add two lengths of rail to complete the track on this module (not counting the inter-modules junctions). This means that maybe at the end of next week the first eight feet of the layout could be operationnal.

                      Comment


                      • Two shots of yesterday and today progress. The bridge and the whole module.




                        Comment


                        • Looks good, Frederic 8D

                          What do you have in your plans for the space behind the trestle? A cliff?

                          Is your turnout built using a fixture or a commercial product?

                          Regarding the openings in the front of your module to access cabling and turnouts motors, you could possibly make the panels covering them be also removable control panels. You could then put toggle switches and LEDs on them, wire everything at your bench to a connector that will plug into a matching connector inside the module.
                          Bruno



                          COHS Member - http://www.cohs.org/

                          CNRHS Member - http://www.cnlines.ca/

                          Comment


                          • I have an idea close to what you describe, Bruno, about the control panel.

                            The turnout was built by our great Alexander and offered to me as a wedding gift more than 10 years ago. I had always kept it as a model for those I build myself, but recently he kindly proposed to make a couple more for me, so I supposed I could use this one.

                            Behind the trestle will be a gentle elevation of the ground. There's not a lot of relief in this area but when they met this depression, loggers who love saws much more than shovels preferred to build a small trestle than to fill the gap.

                            Comment


                            • Excellent!

                              A turnout is an unusual present for a wedding

                              Regarding the trestle, I was assuming that it was either crossing a river and the plywood behind was not yet cut or that it would be along a more sharp terrain. But OK, I see what you intend to do.
                              Bruno



                              COHS Member - http://www.cohs.org/

                              CNRHS Member - http://www.cnlines.ca/

                              Comment


                              • Looking good Frederic!

                                Comment

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