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Dutchman
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Posted - 11/10/2004 :  7:47:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The November 2004 issue of RMC devoted its "Scratchbuilder's Corner" to the topic of "Interiors: philosophy and practice". That article, along with Gerry's recent posting of his modeling of the interior of the bakery, prompted me to open a thread devoted to the art of interior decoration. I hope that members will join in by posting pictures of their efforts and describing some of their techniques.

Let me begin by listing some of the ideas mentioned in the RMC article written by Bob Walker.

(1) Big windows and open doors cry out for interior detailing.
(2) Floor treatments should be continued as far as can be seen through a window or door.
(3)Often it is possible to achieve the illusion of detail by showing the shadow of a person on a shade, or by scattering assorted "clutter" around the interior of a factory or warehouse rather than using expensive detail parts.
(4)"There are times when it pays to be meticulous, going down to glassware on the bar."

The article also talks about the use of commercial detail parts vs scratchbuilt detail parts, the effective use of view blocks, and the artful use of window treatments. All could be addressed in this thread.

So how about it, do you have a picture or technique to share?

Let me start off with a sample of what the author suggests as far as adding flooring as far into the model as can be seen. In these pictures, the "floorboards" only extend an inch or so beyond what can be seen in these photos. They are simply scribed styrene painted "floor brown".



Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 31774

MikeC
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Posted - 11/10/2004 :  8:52:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce, first of all, let me say I think this is going to be a dynamite thread!

I've got plenty of photos of interior detailing, but most of them are of SW kits. As many of us already know, Brett makes interior detailing all too easy because he provides all of the castings and other items necessary to complete a great scene. As a result, there's little "challenge" to doing any extensive detailing with his kits. So.....

While I agree that large windows beg for interior detailing, sometimes that isn't possible with some models. When it isn't, how about considering signs? They're easy to make, and they disguise the fact that the structure is otherwise empty. Here is a photo of a couple of signs I printed and cut to size for a DPM kit a few years ago. (Some of you have already seen this photo in another thread. Sorry.)






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Dutchman
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Posted - 11/11/2004 :  07:58:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, the use of those large posters was an effective way to ensure that people would not just see an empty void behind those large windows.

When I examined more closely the pictures that I took at the NEB&W layout art RPI in Troy, NY, this one jumed out at me because of the empty store front windows. The modeler took a lot of time to take care of the upstairs window treatments, then left the store empty.



Bruce

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MikeC
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Posted - 11/11/2004 :  09:36:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The least he could have done was print some "GOING OUT OF BUSINESS SALE" and "LOST OUR LEASE" signs on white paper and glued them at an angle in the windows. That would offer a plausible excuse for the empty store front.




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Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/11/2004 :  10:58:39 AM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Since Bruce kindly mentioned the bakery (above), I thought I'd repost the photos here.

I'm a huge believer in interior details, not only for the coolness factor, but because, once a layout visitor thinks s/he's seen it all, you can offer them a whole new level to enjoy it on with interior details.

Everything in the bakery interior is scratchbuilt -- counters are .030" styrene painted Stainless Steel. The pastries and breads are tiny beads from my wife's stash painted brown, or just chunks of painted styrene. Signs, chalkboards and floor were printed on a color laser. Wedding cake is two pieces of different diameter wooden dowel; the upper layer is held up by four pieces of .010" brass rod. "Bride and groom" are simply styrene rod painted black, white, and flesh. No details on them at all.



This is how it will look when it's installed in the building. And once the awning is installed, even less will be visible. BUT... when it's discovered by a viewer, it justifies the 2 evenings' work I put into it, IMHO.



Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

jerryglow
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/11/2004 :  11:44:00 AM  Show Profile  Visit jerryglow's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Wish I had a pic of it but I modeled for years with a guy named Freeman so I just had to do a shoe store athought he certainly wasn't related. At the time, I was in the custom painting business and many customers wanted crew figures installed. There were often clearance problems getting the figures in the cabs esp steam engines so many were "amputated" to fit them in. For some reason I kept all the feet and legs (yuck is that guy sick) and guess where they wound up??




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MikeC
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Posted - 11/11/2004 :  12:11:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gerry, that's a beautifully done scene! I marvel at it every time I look at the photos. Did you illuminate the interior also? Or is the lighting in the photo coming from overhead room lights?

-------------------------------

Open doorways, as Bruce already illustrated, can be a problem. But when the doorway is freight-door sized, the problem is as bad as a building with large empty windows. And the larger the structure, the more details it seems to take to "make" the scene. Here's my tractor repair shed. It has three large open doorways - two on the front and one on the side. Between the three, a complete view of the interior is possible. Since I had used most/all of the details that came with the kit, I found myself digging through my "junk" box for extra castings and wood scraps to help fill the scene inside. All of the tiny details - bottles, cans, etc. - on the shelves were individually painted.

Like Gerry said, it can be time consuming to do this, but when the scene is discovered by a viewer...






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Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/11/2004 :  3:55:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

Gerry, that's a beautifully done scene! I marvel at it every time I look at the photos. Did you illuminate the interior also? Or is the lighting in the photo coming from overhead room lights?


The interior hasn't been installed in the building yet, so what you're seeing on the second shot are the photofloods. I'm thinking about white LEDs wrapped in paper (as diffusers) so I never have to worry about the bulbs burning out.

quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

Here's my tractor repair shed. It has three large open doorways


This is the kind of stuff that gets me all jazzed up. This is beautiful. I love clutter like this, and it all looks like "legitimate" clutter -- stuff the guys would actually have put where it is, or would be walking around. You did a great job with placing it all and making the whole shed look "lived-in"!

Are all those things on the shelves individual pieces of indeterminite styrene or is it a mix or are they all SS Ltd. details or what?


Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
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Posted - 11/11/2004 :  5:35:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Gerry


Are all those things on the shelves individual pieces of indeterminite styrene or is it a mix or are they all SS Ltd. details or what?



Gerry, the shelf castings are from Brett Gallant at Sierra West. They are extremely high quality resin castings that are beautifuly detailed. All I did was paint them and place them. A number of the remaining details either came from other sources or I made them (the greasy rags, for example). I'm not sure where some of the detail castings came from now because I've had them for years. Some of the junk castings (not in view in the photo above) I remember are Chooch, but the rest.... Maybe Woodland Scenics... Evergreen... Scale Structures...




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Dutchman
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Posted - 11/11/2004 :  6:38:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Gerry, thanks for posting the store front in this thread and giving us some a description of how you scratchbuilt the details!

Mike, a great example of super detailing of an interior. May I prevail upon you to once again describe how you make your oily rags?


Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 31774 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
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Posted - 11/11/2004 :  9:17:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dutchman

Mike, a great example of super detailing of an interior. May I prevail upon you to once again describe how you make your oily rags?



Bruce, they're really very easy to make. I cut a 3/32" (approx.) square from the corner of a facial tissue such as Puffs and then separate it into 2 single-ply pieces. Next, I shake up a bottle of Polly Oily Black and remove the cap. Using tweezers, I dip the corner of one square into the edge of the paint in the bottle cap and let it wick into the tissue. After it's dried for a minute or two, I wad the little piece up between my fingers, straighten it back out, and then drape it over the edge of a (model) workbench or over a railing and let it dry in place. Sometimes I don't straighten it back out. I just leave it in a wad and place it on the floor or on a workbench.

If you just want a moderately soiled rag, substitute flat red paint for the Oily Black. Then after it's dried, use a fine brush to lightly streak it with black. The rags hanging over the rail of the tool car were done in this manner.






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Dutchman
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Posted - 11/11/2004 :  10:55:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike,
Thanks for the tutorial. This time I cut and pasted it into my "tips" folder.

Going back to the topic of large store windows, when building the "Little Dutch Store", I felt that something had to be behind the windows, even thought they would eventually be recessed behind a rather large overhang.



The solution was to build two "display" cases out of balsa wood, paint them green, and then put a few "crates of fruit & vegetables" on them. Those crates were fairly crude plastic castings that came with an IHC freight house kit--not suitable for close-up viewing, but perfect for inside the store front.



On more than one occasion, I have used "second rate" details by burying them in the background inside a building.


Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 31774 Go to Top of Page

George D
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Posted - 11/11/2004 :  11:22:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You guys have some very interesting ideas for interior details.

I made the stacks of beer cases for the interior of the Connoquenessing Valley Beer Distributor from drawings I did using a CAD program. They're mounted on Tichy pallets. I don't remember who made the beer kegs.





George



Country: USA | Posts: 15450 Go to Top of Page

Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/12/2004 :  12:37:30 AM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by George D

I made the stacks of beer cases for the interior of the Connoquenessing Valley Beer Distributor from drawings I did using a CAD program.


Wow -- great idea for the inside of a warehouse, George. I'll have to remember that one.


Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

Gerry
Engine Wiper

Posted - 11/12/2004 :  12:56:05 AM  Show Profile  Visit Gerry's Homepage  Reply with Quote
At the very edge of the BV layout there's a sliver of land that contains part of a building named "Hunt Paints" -- named for my good friend and fellow Railroad Line Forumster, Dave Hunt (Thorn Creek & Western).

The sliver of land was unprototypically thin, so I decided to "chop" the building off right at the aisle, just like the rest of the "world" is chopped off there. So the innards are totally exposed, and as "up front" as you can get.

Here's a shot of that. The outside walls are most of the DPM "Cutting's Scissors" building. What was interesting was to try to figure out what the floorplans would be, based on the locations of the doors and windows. ("hmmm...what were they thinking?")

Had to scratchbuild two staircases from the ground to the first floor. First floor has a receptionist room, and the usual loading dock stuff, as well as I-beams holding up the second floor, and even headers over the dock doors.

Upstairs is Mr. Hunt's office with his secretaries and their desks, and part of the hallway with a bulletin board,paintings, etc. I even scratchbuilt a fire extinguisher in a case for the hall.

All the doors and windows had to be finished on the inside, too.

BUT... this building always gets a ton of comments!



Gerry (MMR #346)

Country: USA | Posts: 264 Go to Top of Page

jerryglow
Engine Wiper



Posted - 11/12/2004 :  07:38:06 AM  Show Profile  Visit jerryglow's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
[i]
I made the stacks of beer cases for the interior of the Connoquenessing Valley Beer Distributor from drawings I did using a CAD program. They're mounted on Tichy pallets. I don't remember who made the beer kegs.

George



Lemme just back up my truck and load up



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