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Author Previous Topic: FSM Kit #35 Two Stall Engine House Topic Next Topic: Red Bird Taxis - In O
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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/21/2021 :  5:24:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One challenge for this year was to bash a kit. It took me a while to get inspired, but I've finally picked a kit and started the bash.

The kit is Mine Mount Models "Wileys Good Times Tavern" https://minemountmodels.com/shop/ols/products/wileys-good-times-tavern It didn't hurt this kit is on sale and is the topic of a build contest.

What you'll notice is the front of the kit is stucco. I've always hated stucco, so I'm doing the front in brick. One thing I've seen in some older towns are structures that were added on to, often built pre Civil War with Victorian era additions and touches. So my kit will have the front part be brick instead of stucco, and will have a whole new 3rd story with a Mansard roof.

dave
Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8973

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/21/2021 :  5:35:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The big challenge for me is how to do the mansard. I used my 10" table saw to cut a piece of poplar at about a 15-20 degree angle.

I use a good quality rip blade to do this. The resulting piece is about 2" tall, so the next question is 'how tall will the Mansard roof be?" I laid the pieces down on the mansard, including another structure next to it, to get a sense of size. I want to use the dormers from the original kit (although they'll have to be extensively reworked.)




Next I had to decide if I wanted to include the back "package store." I decided not, so I cut a new back wall from a matching piece of clapboard siding. Then I cut the peaked gables off of the clapboard ends, so this is the rear of the structure (with the cutoff/unused parts above.) I added a door and double window on the ground floor.


I glued the bracing onto these parts, plus the plain wood pieces that will get covered by brick paper. Then I painted the insides black (I'll probably do some lighting.)

Next step is to paint the clapboard and corner trim and assemble those parts. I'll also think through and attach the brick paper and assemble the brick front. Then I'll glue the walls together, and cut a floor for the structure. (I won't glue the floor into place, but it'll add rigidity when the structure is set on top.) Once the structure walls are assembled, I'll start on the roof.

dave



Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 03/21/2021 5:42:58 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 8973 Go to Top of Page

postalkarl
Fireman



Posted - 03/22/2021 :  01:15:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
hey Dave:

It's coming along nicely so far.

Karl S.



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robert goslin
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/22/2021 :  04:06:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, Nice looking structure, and with the mansard roof, should look very nice. They are such an unusual shape. Good luck working it out.

Regards Rob

My current build.
http://railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=53468

Country: Australia | Posts: 2951 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/22/2021 :  3:48:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The brick paper is overlaid on the front of the kit. This is stuff I think I got off the internet, it's really more OO than HO, but it looks OK. The "sticky" isn't that great so I will probably reinforce the glue with some CA.

And a test-fit of the two halves of the structure:


I also made a floor (sits inside the walls) and ran 1/8 square around the outside for a foundation (I'll use the same brick paper.)


Now I can cut a subroof that will also fit inside the structure, and then build the Mansard on top of that.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8973 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/22/2021 :  6:17:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I laid out and cut down the Mansard subroof.

Part of this was figuring out how much overhang the Mansard would have in front of the wall. Then I looked at how the gable windows would fit, to determine how tall the Mansard would be.

And a test fit on the front of the structure

The proportions look OK, there's enough space to do a roof over the window gable.

The next challenge is cutting the mitre corners in the gable. I'll do that on my tilt-arbor modeler table saw. This is one of the few times where the tilt function really pays for itself. But the layout isn't obvious... Fortunately, I have plenty of Mansard stock if I make a mistake or two or three :-(

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8973 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/22/2021 :  7:17:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Cutting the Mansards was an effort in careful measuring, marking, and sawing, but they're cut!


And here's how the structure looks:


dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8973 Go to Top of Page

mikethetrainman
Fireman



Posted - 03/22/2021 :  7:24:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave neat looking project. I don't think I have seen to many people do mansard roof. If you have a chop saw (power miter saw) it should be easy to cut the corners. Just sit the wood piece down on the table with the flat back to the fence and cut on a 45. No figuring necessary.

Mike Mace
Northern Division of the Santa Fe

Country: USA | Posts: 1903 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/22/2021 :  7:35:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, thanks! The problem with using a conventional mitre saw is the pieces are really short, about 3", so holding them in place is a challenge. I'd need to build an aux fence. But tilting the blade at 45 and then carefully marking and thinking-through which end to cut worked out OK.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8973 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 03/22/2021 :  9:53:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Neat kitbash you have going on here, Dave. Iím looking forward to seeing how it turns out. To me, mansard roofs are the epitome of high Victorian.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 7476 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/23/2021 :  08:59:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is a clever way to form the Mansard Roof, Dave. I like the modifications you are doing.


Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 33523 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 03/23/2021 :  09:43:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice job on the roof Dave!!

Jerry

"And in the end, it's not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 13384 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 03/23/2021 :  10:10:28 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice job of sorting out the geometry of your cutting angles, Dave.

George


Fly Army

Country: USA | Posts: 16944 Go to Top of Page

postalkarl
Fireman



Posted - 03/23/2021 :  3:00:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hey Dave:

Looks just great so far.

Karl S.



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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 03/24/2021 :  7:51:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dormers and chimneys constructed, and mocked-up on the Mansard.

I used the leftover long piece of wood to set the angle on my modeler table saw and then finished sanding the angle so the chimneys matched.

Then I did the front (diamond) shingles. That's nit-picky work, and I don't have enough of those to do the full roof, so for the sides and back I'll use my "normal" slates.

dave



Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 8973 Go to Top of Page

mikethetrainman
Fireman



Posted - 03/26/2021 :  8:37:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave your kitbash is coming along nicely. roof looks great.

Mike Mace
Northern Division of the Santa Fe

Country: USA | Posts: 1903 Go to Top of Page
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