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Author Previous Topic: Bollinger Edgerly  Whitefield Junction kit Topic Next Topic: Building the Pennsylvania & New York Rail Road
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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 10/21/2020 :  6:19:33 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Let me clarify. I want to see both, but the grand tour is my preference for what we see next, to see the big picture.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 6774 Go to Top of Page

Greg Rich
Crew Chief

Posted - 10/21/2020 :  7:41:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sheesh!
Sounds like you guys like your cake and Ice cream!

This'll take a while longer, but, then I guess we have nowhere to go, Eh?

The story of the Huron Brave started long ago in a universe far, far away. I was privileged to visit Irv Schulz layout in my younger days and was REALLY IMPRESSED with the level of detail and the consistant theme throughout his 1895 era railroad; the St. Clair Northern.
Most of all, I liked his boats. When I asked him about them, he referred me to A.J Fisher, a Detroit area manufacturer of scale boat kits made from wood. Well, long story short, I visited said shop and the Huron Brave kit followed me home. That was about 1985 or so. Like so many of my earlier purchases, the H.B. was sentenced to isolation until November of 2019, when it saw the light of day during a bull session following an OPS. After that, it was Katie, bar the door!



As you can see, the "kit" was comprised of a shaped solid hull, blocks of wood and a set of plans. Needless to say a whole lot of imagination and elbow grease were going to be needed. I asked a good friend who had access to some major woodworking equipment to "cut her off at the waterline".

The first order of business was to cut of the gunnels, sand down and smooth the hull and make a couple of cuts that would allow some open ports.


Now it's time to add the new basswood gunnels.IMHO, this really gives the boat the feeling of a true hull. These were constructed and placed using yellow carpenter's glue.



The basswood deck planking was obtained commercially as ships deck planking. It was cut to fit and applied prior to installation of the gunnels. During the same session, the fore and aft bulkheads were also fab'd and installed.





With both the gunnels and bulkheads in place and the glue set, I applied some Elmer's wood putty to both port and starboard sides and allowed to dry thoroughly.



The next day, I sanded these smooth and touched up as needed.

With the gunnels completed I moved on to the rear side engine room ports, 2 per side.


Basswood was cut to fill the openings and glued in place. Appropriate deck bracing was also placed.

Shown below are the results of Elmer's wood putty/filler and some 120 grit sandpaper and finished off with some 180 grit.





With this done, the basic hull is now very much more presentable.

Well, folks that's it for now, we'll continue this saga soon,

As always,
Greg R.







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robert goslin
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/22/2020 :  01:06:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Howdy Greg. Yes, we want it all.
Always like seeing a great layout, but also I think most here also enjoy boats. I know I do.

That looks like a lot of work, but sure does look fine. Nice job on the sanding. Can't tell where you spliced in those bits.
A very substantial ship. How long is it ?


Regards Rob

Despite the cost of living, It's still popular

Country: Australia | Posts: 2511 Go to Top of Page

late-1800s
New Hire

Posted - 10/22/2020 :  07:38:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is jaw-dropping, amazing modelling, layout work and photography. I love how a black and white photo was included. I am humbled by the modelling shown here, thank you for sharing it!


Country: | Posts: 6 Go to Top of Page

Greg Rich
Crew Chief

Posted - 10/23/2020 :  11:56:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Just a quick drop here.
I decided to include a picture from the plans so you know where we are headed with the H.B. It grabbed me when I saw it, hope you are similarly afflicted. I don't know who built that model, but whoever did, . . . my hat is off to him!

Robert, she is about 157 feet in HO scale(3.5mm/ft) or 174 feet long in 1/8" scale.



Greg R.



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acousticco
Fireman



Posted - 10/24/2020 :  11:48:16 AM  Show Profile  Visit acousticco's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very cool! I'll be following along closely!

-Cody



Country: Canada | Posts: 1767 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/25/2020 :  08:24:23 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote



Country: USA | Posts: 13323 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/25/2020 :  09:22:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Greg, this is just fantastic work! Those fillers are almost invisible and will be when finished.



Bruce

Country: USA | Posts: 32885 Go to Top of Page

Greg Rich
Crew Chief

Posted - 10/25/2020 :  4:04:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Bruce,
I agree, with some wood filler, sandpaper and a little patience, it yields a very smooth surface.

Now that the outside surface of the hull is in a reasonable state, time to work on the fore and aft bulkheads.



There was a hatch in the plans, that I assume led to the boiler/engine room. I wanted some depth to my model, so it was previously carved out and framed for a sliding door. The bulkhead is scribed siding that was given a coat of white paint to seal it.





The next night, it was time to locate both of the masts. The locations were marked and the HB was moved to the drill press, to assure a vertical hole.
With the masts temporarily in place, some woodwork and a sliding hatch cover were fitted.

Next my attention shifted to the forecastle.
Decking was cut and fit and the forward bulkhead was painted and added.





Here is a shot of her with her new details, and standing proud.



Note how the masts are tapered near the tops. another fringe benefit of a file and a drill press.

More to come, but for now,
See ya later!

Greg R.



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acousticco
Fireman



Posted - 10/25/2020 :  5:55:29 PM  Show Profile  Visit acousticco's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very fine work as usual! Outstanding!

-Cody



Country: Canada | Posts: 1767 Go to Top of Page

robert goslin
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/26/2020 :  11:14:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good Greg. I especially like the decking.
So at 157' your model is over half a meter / 21" long That's huge.
Will be a real centrepiece.

Nice job on the tapered masts too.


Regards Rob

Despite the cost of living, It's still popular

Country: Australia | Posts: 2511 Go to Top of Page

CNE1899
New Hire



Posted - 10/27/2020 :  1:46:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Greg,
Very nice wood work, and good looking ship. Nice lathe as well.

Scott



Country: | Posts: 48 Go to Top of Page

Greg Rich
Crew Chief

Posted - 11/03/2020 :  12:52:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It's about time to record another entry in this thread.
Below is a photo of the plans that reveal the structures that will populate the deck of our boat.



As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words, and I like to say if I have a picture, I can usually build it close enough for horseshoes.

I spent some time with some .040" styrene sheet and constructed the bow gunnels. I also added the bow stem from basswood. I like to use whatever material will fill the requirements of the component being fab'd.
As can be seen in this pic, the block of wood supplied in the kit as the wheelhouse, is just not going to make it. It doesn't do a convincing job, even if painted.




So, after digging into my box of styrene sheet, I spent an evening or two building the wheelhouse from plastic and the chart room from basswood.







With the bow in fair shape I turned to the stern. It's time to think of rub strakes. I thought about styrene, but with the stress of the extreme bend, I didn't want the glue letting go in 5 years, so, I decided on basswood again.
First order of business is to make a form to bend the wood. I traced the shape of the stern onto a 1X6 piece of pine, cut it on the band saw and sanded it smooth.



By employing several clamps and a lot of imaginative cursing, I was able to position the hot water soaked basswood strips inside the form and let it dry for a day or 3. I made more than needed just in case a strip did not turn out as planned. (and it didn't) Notice that the inside edge of the female form is lined with styrene strip.


With these strips in hand, the next thing to accomplish is to mount them on the hull.
Titebond yellow glue with the aid of straight pins works just fine, thank you.



Well, folks, it's close to 1:00 AM on election day, so good night all and remember to vote!

Kind Regards,
Greg R.






Country: | Posts: 513 Go to Top of Page

CNE1899
New Hire



Posted - 11/03/2020 :  08:35:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Greg,
Enjoying the play by play! Looking good. Also thanks for comments on materials and methods.



Country: | Posts: 48 Go to Top of Page

Greg Rich
Crew Chief

Posted - 11/09/2020 :  8:30:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Scott,
Thanks for following along. Let's have some more play by play.

Just as a roadmap, here's a picture from the plans of what our boat is to look like.




I transferred the locations of the rubstrakes from the plans to the hull using pencil marks and added the remainder of the basswood rubstrakes. Those with sharp eyes will also notice that the rear deck was also added using some hefty weights until the glue dries.
This basswood decking is available from several places, I think Micro Mark is one. The nice thing about this decking is that it is made into planks glued together with what looks like "black glue" which simulates tarred joints very nicely.



The next work session was to be "planking night". I came up with a variation on a theme with this one. I have been known to work with paper on a lot of my models, so I decided to give this a whirl, and make it work for me here.
With a sheet of artist paper; Strathmore 100# smooth. (used for watercolors), a hefty straight edge and a new single edge razor blade, I cut a number of "planks".




Using the rubstrakes as a guide, I layed up the individual planks, gluing them in place with thinned yellow carpenter's glue.

As you can see, this really starts to give
the solid wooden hull some detailed definition and character.

The bow was the easy part, when we reach the stern, things can get tricky if you don't plan your planks.

I am sure there are some "old Salts" out there somewhere that will scratch their collective chins while looking at my planking. I built this steam barge for my railroad and not a nautical museum. Although, this landlubber appreciates constructive input.

Once the lower hull planking was completed, the next order of business was to put a coat of black paint on my new planks and turn my attention to the pilot house, again.

One of the techniques I like to use while building a complex model (or MRR layout for that matter) is to not get bogged down in spending an inordinate amount of time on a tedious task, it can be a fatal blow to the enthusiasm of the build. If I start losing interest, my attention and skills will be redirected to some as-yet unfinished sub assembly of the model that looks interesting. This way, it's a new challenge with something that will engage my gray matter. I can always come back and complete the tedious part later when I am up to it.

So, with that little bit of personal philosophy out of the way, we turn our attention back to the pilot house.

The first thing that may draw your attention is the structure atop the pilot house. I spent a lot of time looking at old B&W pictures of Great Lakes steamers plying the St.Clair River.
Many of them had an auxiliary wheel & navigational aides atop the pilot house. From this perch, the captain had a better view of the traffic and navigational hazards. I guess it is kind of like a "flying bridge" on today's pleasure craft. This perch could get rather breezy on a cool day or hot while baking under the summer sun, so a wrapping of protective canvas was called for.

This structure on my model was built using brass wire, a soldering iron and a lot of . . shall we say self-talk.




After a bit more brass wire/railing work, I needed to add some canvas to see how it would work. This was made from tissue paper. The paper was pre-painted to a canvas color, then cut to fit and Goo-d in place using Walther's Goo.



A point of interest here, in many of the "Old Pictures" I mentioned, I noticed a peak in the canvas similar to that of an old umbrella tent. Upon closer inspection, I detected faint lines running from the apex up to an overhead pulley. So, the "tent" roof was suspended by this rope and did not require a "tent pole".
What to do on my model? I decided to add a small upright "tent pole" from a crossmember to support the "canvas apex" and rig the apex line to this upright later on when it came time.

Well Folks, I hope you have enjoyed this work session, if you have any questions, please do not hesitate to ask.
Until next time,

Greg R.



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