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Author Previous Topic: Lets get those ON30 juices flowing Topic Next Topic: Corps of Canadian Railway Troops  Europe 1918
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Larryc
Engine Wiper



Posted - 05/13/2020 :  2:50:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Over the past few months I've been thinking about starting a new project; with this in mind I decided to model my Grandparents farm as it appeared in the 1940's. Because of the sheer size of the buildings modeling in Gn15 would have produced a very large layout. So I decided to drop down a scale or two to keep this project in a reasonable sized area; On30 seemed like a good fit. Even though this takes me to "the dark side" of modeling; thought that I would give it a go.

The farm was purchased around the mid 1920's for $1000 with a yearly mortgage of $100 paid once for that year. When the Great Depression struck they had to save every penny possible in order to make that yearly mortgage payment or loose the farm. Gratefully they were able to make every payment until the farm was paid-off. About 1950, with no interest from their grown children in farming, my Grandparents sold the farm and moved into town.

Fortunately I have a few photos of the Farm, including the house, barn, and outbuildings:







Not sure how large this project will end up being. I'm going to make the buildings first, then figure out how large it will be. Also this is going to be more of a diorama than a layout with a siding coming into the Farm to pickup the milk; even though it never actually existed. It's called "modeling license".

The Cy Mining Co. mini layout has been put on the "back burner", for now, so that I can start this new project. Thought that it would be fun to recreate some of my families history with pictures to model by.

More to follow.

Country: USA | Posts: 362

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 05/13/2020 :  5:26:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks like a great project. Don't forget the dog!!

Jerry

"And in the end, its not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 12729 Go to Top of Page

BigLars
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 05/13/2020 :  6:02:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That is a great project.


Country: USA | Posts: 11740 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/13/2020 :  9:06:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good luck on a noble project. That Collie really tells a story.

Jim


Take the red pill

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Rick
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/14/2020 :  08:03:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Is the collie running to let everyone know Timmy fell down the well again?
I will definitely follow along as you build this.



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David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 05/14/2020 :  09:59:25 AM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Its great to honor your own family history in modeling. There was a similar project a few years back on this forum by CarlB, it was a wonderful tribute to his ancestry. It might help guide your thoughts. Here's the link.

http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50218&SearchTerms=Frank,Bertha



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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 05/14/2020 :  10:52:25 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Larry,

Looks like its going to be a fun and interesting project to follow. From the Greek revival look to the house and the snow it might not be too far from Carls family farm (Westfield, NY vicinity).

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 6610 Go to Top of Page

CieloVistaRy
Fireman



Posted - 05/14/2020 :  1:51:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
No modeling license required in the realms of the dark side! Continue as you wish.

Arthur

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Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 05/14/2020 :  3:01:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking forward to your project Larry!

Where is the farm located?

And member David Buchholz... beat me at offering my own thread as a reference.......



Country: USA | Posts: 3920 Go to Top of Page

Larryc
Engine Wiper



Posted - 05/14/2020 :  5:34:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Carl, Arthur, Michael, David, Rick, Jim, Larry, and Jerry thanks for your thoughts and words of encouragement.

The Farm was located northeast of Syracuse, NY up in the hills in a small hamlet known as Perryville. The Farm was in a valley down a dirt road and my GreatGrand Parents also owned a small farm about a mile or so up the same road. After the farm was sold the new owners demolished what was left of the buildings and used the land for crops. To the best of my knowledge the same family still farms the land today.

David that was an inspiring family story and build of your family history. Nice to see that this type of build is achievable.

This is going to be lot of fun seeing the Family Farm come off the pictures and become 3D, the farm was gone before my time, even if it's just a model. Thanks for following along on this journey with me. More to follow.




Country: USA | Posts: 362 Go to Top of Page

David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 05/14/2020 :  9:53:30 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
To Carl, I was very impressed by your family farm build on several levels, not just the obvious modeling skills, but that you beautifully honored your ancestors in the process. That touched me deeply.

(Keep in mind that under their breath, people say "That guy is touched" if ya know what I mean)



Edited by - David J Buchholz on 05/15/2020 08:03:23 AM

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Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 05/15/2020 :  08:36:49 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks David, now it's Larry's turn to build his family farm!


Country: USA | Posts: 3920 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 05/15/2020 :  08:37:37 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Yes, the house, barns and silo looked upstate NY to me. I grew up in Batavia and Rochester and my current layout is set in Auburn. The architecture is distinctive. Im going to enjoy this.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 6610 Go to Top of Page

Philip
Fireman



Posted - 05/15/2020 :  10:44:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit Philip's Homepage  Reply with Quote





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Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/15/2020 :  12:58:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
David,

This looks like an interesting project to follow, so count me in. I've wanted to do something similar, but not yet.
One word of thought here, I was told by my Grandfather, that when farmers were constructing their buildings, they usually built the farm barns and outbuildings first, and with whatever wood was left, they then built the house. Their mainstay was that their barns would produce their income, so the buildings had to be built good. When my parents bought a farm that was built in the late 1800's, this was true, my Mom always complained that the floor boards in her living room were bumpy due to unplained boards. When they installed wall to wall rug, you could see every bump.
Great project, I will be following along.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 4621 Go to Top of Page

Larryc
Engine Wiper



Posted - 05/15/2020 :  3:46:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
When my Grandparents bought the Farm it was already a working farm so the buildings were all ready there. As a side note I guess that I'm going to be buying a model Collie dog since "Chucky", not to confused with the doll in the horror films, seems to be a big hit here on the forum.

Ok time to get started. Years ago I purchased some computer software to plan models with. It was called ModelBuilder by Evan Designs. It's a very easy to use cad type program which was meant to have the model printed out on paper, cut out, and built. I've been using it to plan buildings and locating windows, doors, and rooflines. It can be used in multiple scales for different types of modeling:



Since I'm not selling or making any money posting this pic of the software I should be ok and it's for demonstration purposes only. As you can see I have been able to tell exactly where the windows and doors are to placed and what the front of the building will look like before I touch a bit of materials. Also in the top lefthand corner it will tell you the size of whatever has been clicked on and you can resize anything on that page. Works pretty well and I will use this process to plan all of the buildings.



Here we go; I'm making the house out of foamcore with bracing added for strength and to stop any warping. Also I have enough wood to do the barn only. These are the four walls for the main part of the house which will have two more additions attached to it. Figured that this would give me a solid surface to add the siding, windows, and doors.



This is the back wall which has the corner bracing added. It was indented just enough so that the side wall ends will be flush with the back wall. The front wall received the same treatment.

Thanks for following along and any suggestions/comments will be appreciated. More to follow.




Country: USA | Posts: 362 Go to Top of Page
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