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Author Previous Topic: Winter Build Challenge:  Old Red Ball kits Topic Next Topic: small coal facilities?
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Tintic Range
Section Hand

Posted - 08/02/2020 :  5:21:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I took a modeling hiatus over the last few months and returned to complete some long-overdue projects.

Here is my latest freight car, a Winona & St. Peter boxcar, another kitbash from a B.T.S. Civil War era kit. The W&StP ran in Minnesota and South Dakota, but since it was a C&NW subsidiary, and the C&NW interchanged with the Union Pacific, I figured it would be a good option for a foreign road car among my solid roster of UP and CPRR.

The W&StP is an old railroad, having been organized before the Civil War, so I distressed this model a bit more than previous ones since I'm representing post-Promontory Summit transcontinental railroad. The canvas roof is peeling up to expose the wood sheathing underneath.

After it was complete though I found out that the car was probably a deep yellow ocher rather than the red I used.



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acousticco
Fireman



Posted - 08/02/2020 :  8:49:23 PM  Show Profile  Visit acousticco's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Fantastic batch of rolling stock, and a nice engine as well. Looking forward to following along.

-Cody



Country: Canada | Posts: 1767 Go to Top of Page

Tintic Range
Section Hand

Posted - 10/29/2020 :  12:04:10 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Some glamor shots of this year's projects taken outdoors. The Rivarossi engine still needs the flanges to be turned.


Some friends and I are writing a guide to modifying the Bachmann new tool 4-4-0 so this project was a proof of concept to show how easy it is to improve the stock model without extensive modifications. I also discovered the hard way that the tender is not actually black.




The emigrant coach and all freight car lettering are more decals that I designed myself tracing from historic photographs.



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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/29/2020 :  08:39:24 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good looking rolling stock, Josh.

George


Fly Army

Country: USA | Posts: 16596 Go to Top of Page

late-1800s
New Hire

Posted - 10/29/2020 :  3:48:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very impressive, top-notch modelling being shown in this thread. Thanks so much for sharing it!

HO part recommendations for the 4-4-0 balloon stack shown on page 3? I'm hoping for something other than PSC 31445 (presently out of stock) or $$$ Shapeways prints.



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dave1905
Fireman



Posted - 10/29/2020 :  5:56:41 PM  Show Profile  Visit dave1905's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Nice modeling.

Dave Husman

Iron Men and wooden cars
Visit my website : www.wnbranch.com

Country: USA | Posts: 1176 Go to Top of Page

Faire to Midland
New Hire

Posted - 10/30/2020 :  10:04:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very nice modeling! I especially like the handrails on your emigrant car.

One question tho; You said you found out too late the boxcar should be a yellow ochre color... How in the world did you find out what color the boxcar should have been? Or the tender shouldn't be black?



Edited by - Faire to Midland on 10/30/2020 10:05:45 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 42 Go to Top of Page

dave1905
Fireman



Posted - 10/30/2020 :  10:10:12 AM  Show Profile  Visit dave1905's Homepage  Reply with Quote
There are photos and you can tell the difference in color in general terms, lighter vs. darker. Plus there are hand colored pictures and news paper articles. Articles back then often went into greater detail on the subjects and often described colors just because there weren't color pictures, so the author had to "paint" the picture with the article.

Dave Husman

Iron Men and wooden cars
Visit my website : www.wnbranch.com

Country: USA | Posts: 1176 Go to Top of Page

Tintic Range
Section Hand

Posted - 10/30/2020 :  12:39:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
RE: freight car colors
The idea that you can identify a color from old photographs is a myth. The emulsions used in the 19th century were mostly ultraviolet-sensitive so yellows tended to turn black while deep blues and purples were lighter than in reality, e.g. light colors turned dark and dark colors light based on which end of the spectrum their wavelength sits. It's not a direct translation from hue to shade.

Outside of photographs, the second-best way to determine color is by paper documentation; we know that Central Pacific's freight cars were an oxide color, but of course what shade of oxide is unknown so I used a variety of red-browns on my CPRR cars to represent different phases of car construction. We know Georgia Railroad cars from the 1860s were a slate blue color due to eyewitness reports, although there is some debate as to what slate blue actually means. We also know that most pre-Civil War railroads used colors other than brown for their cars - yellow ochres, grays, blues, and whites being the most common. So after discussion with some historians who specialize in historic paint, we decided that the W&StP, being an very early Great Lakes railroad built before the Civil War probably would have used yellow ochre, and that would correlate to the dark shades on the old glass plate photographs of the railroad's cars.

As Dave mentioned, the absolute best sources are contemporary historic artworks. Railroad companies often commissioned color lithographs of their equipment to advertise; and many artists painted the railroads they saw, but sadly these resources are rare so we are left to interpret written documents to fill in the gaps.



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Tintic Range
Section Hand

Posted - 12/20/2020 :  01:14:00 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Haven't done much modeling lately, this simple refurbishing project took several months. The Woodland Scenics white metal structure kits are cute, but a bit too cute. Their cubical dimensions aren't very realistic at all, but the detail of the fascias and trim is excellent. I inherited these poorly-assembled stock models and decided to repurpose them into something that would fit 1870s Utah Territory. We tend to imagine the old west as being run-down and heavily dilapidated, but the reality is that I am modeling a town as it was newly built, so I opted for very clean, sharp work and newly-sawn wood.



First order of business was to disassemble them. The milled wood parts were tossed and replaced with Evergreen styrene siding to elongate the structures into more realistic proportions. In the typical wild west fashion the flat roofs were converted to peaked roofs. Paint colors were chosen based on surviving historic paint catalogs from the 1870s, some of which can be found on Pacificng.org.






Now it really bothers me when these companies make clearly 19th-century kits but include fairly modern infrastructure like electrical conduits and meters. After trying to cut those off of the green building, I gave up and chose the path of least resistance, which was to disguise the electrical details. Thus it became a telegraph office.

The roofs were finished with cedar shake shingles, just American Model Builders peel-n-stick roofing drybrushed with gray and washed with burnt umber.



Then I drew up some decals. The majority of the Great Basin was served by the Deseret Telegraph Company, which was owned by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints and ran from Paris Idaho to Pipe Springs Arizona. The right hand store became Martin Meister Shoe & Boot Repair, which has a family connection as my great-great-great uncle of that name operated a shoe shop in Illinois in the 19th century. Finally, a boardwalk and raingutter were built from stripwood.







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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/20/2020 :  07:48:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice conversion of those buildings, Josh. Well thought out.

George


Fly Army

Country: USA | Posts: 16596 Go to Top of Page

Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/20/2020 :  08:31:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote



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Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 12/20/2020 :  10:06:37 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote


New York, Vermont & Northern Rwy. - Route of the Black Diamonds

Country: USA | Posts: 3895 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/20/2020 :  10:37:08 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Josh,

Excellent reuse of the two buildings. I like the way you joined them together with the interesting roof lines as a result.

Mike



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quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/22/2020 :  5:27:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Excellent and accurate modeling'.. Congratulations on such beautiful work'..


Ted

Country: USA | Posts: 6169 Go to Top of Page
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