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Author Previous Topic: A Pair of Cabeese for the Ocali Creek Topic Next Topic: AB BRAKE SYSTEMS (TICHY PARTS)
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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2019 :  9:10:17 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Over the past decade or more I have built a number of BTS rolling stock kits representing late 19th Century cars. I built the first half-dozen largely following kit directions, but since then I have modified many to fit different prototypes. These are nice kits that I've used as feed-stock to expand my roster.

A few months ago I bought another handful of kits, and as one of my first projects of the year I intend to show my progress in building them.

To be continued . . .
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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4745

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/01/2019 :  9:17:34 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I have wanted to add a couple of Philadelphia and Reading 30' boxcars to my roster for some time. The Reading and Lehigh Valley were competitors and old photos show P&R cars on the LV.

I am going to use the BTS kit for a generic 32' boxcar as starting material, and a photo from Shorpy and drawings from Eric Neubauer's book on early Reading equipment as guides.



The first step will be to shorten the car. The width and height match dimensions of the prototype car pretty well.

Mike


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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4745 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 01/02/2019 :  08:58:30 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mike you should be able to handle that with no problem.


Edited by - Frank Palmer on 01/02/2019 08:59:13 AM

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Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 01/02/2019 :  09:03:51 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I'll be watching the progress. I might learn a thing or two.

Bernd



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Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/02/2019 :  10:28:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I will be following along too. As Bernd said, we might learn something !

Rich



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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/02/2019 :  4:01:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Thank you, Frank, Bernd, and Rich.

Iíll probably have more pictures later today.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 4745 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 01/02/2019 :  4:57:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I sure like the look of these late 19th century cars. i don't know why, but these boxcars are cool.


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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/02/2019 :  5:07:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Carl B

I sure like the look of these late 19th century cars. i don't know why, but these boxcars are cool.


Carl, I guess I have to agree since it's part of my interest in that period.

Thank you for lookin' in.

Mike




Country: USA | Posts: 4745 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/02/2019 :  5:27:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Did a little work this morning while streaming early blues music over my phone. The first task was to shorten the body. I carefully cut out 2' from the sills as seen here:



The side framing gets a similar treatment:



Because I rarely model a car with open doors I don't worry about the opening. The frame won't show at all. More important for laser kits is maintaining the interlocking tabs and slots tha6t create a nice strong and square framework when sides, ends and bottom are assembled





Because I sliced and rejoined the sides and underframe they are pretty fragile on their own, but gluing them all together with the ends makes for a stronger assembly, still requiring care in handling. But gluing the floor in place really starts to make for a strong unit:



I will still need to be careful until the sides are glued on.

Mike




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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4745 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Crew Chief

Posted - 01/02/2019 :  6:33:18 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mike,

You make it look easy, but I know it is careful and important foundation work. Looking forward to seeing the work progress.

Galen


My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 628 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/02/2019 :  7:37:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by ocalicreek

Mike,

You make it look easy, but I know it is careful and important foundation work. Looking forward to seeing the work progress.

Galen



Galen,

Thank you for your interest.

Iíve learned the hard way to take extra care with the core whether or not Iím doing modifications.

Mike



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David J Buchholz
Crew Chief

Posted - 01/02/2019 :  11:36:19 PM  Show Profile  Send David J Buchholz an AOL message  Reply with Quote
Thanks for the step by step photos. They do so much to clarify things.

Home of the North Coast Railroad.

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Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 01/03/2019 :  09:53:44 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Mike what thickness is that wood? It looks like quarter inch in the photos.


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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/03/2019 :  1:12:24 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Frank Palmer

Mike what thickness is that wood? It looks like quarter inch in the photos.


The thickness is actually 1/16th inch. Looks a lot thicker in the photos, doesn't it?

Mike


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Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

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quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/03/2019 :  1:23:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sure does look thicker than 1/16th Mike, that is very delicate'.. Hats off to you mastering this fragile work...


Ted

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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/03/2019 :  1:41:15 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David J Buchholz

Thanks for the step by step photos. They do so much to clarify things.



You're welcome, Dave. Here are a couple more steps.

The end sheathing is glued on carefully to make sure it is square, centered, and with the bottom edge flush with the bottom of the end sill. Although the sheathing fits the core almost exactly, it is recommended that edges be sanded a little to make certain they don't stick out at all:



Even if there is no discernible material to sand off, it ensures a nice flat surface to glue the side sheathing to:



Obviously I trimmed the siding at the doorways. In gluing it to the core I make sure that all edges match as they should. I want the bottom edges of end or side sheathing to be even. I do not want the side sheathing to be at all shy of the ends. After I took the photo, I sanded the edges to make certain they are not proud of the ends at all. The result: a nice, clean corner. I usually round the corner just the slightest little bit ("breaking the edge"), a trick I learned in furniture making which oddly enough makes the object look more solid. Not much, just a little break.

Next: truss rods.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4745 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 6 Previous Topic: A Pair of Cabeese for the Ocali Creek Topic Next Topic: AB BRAKE SYSTEMS (TICHY PARTS)  
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