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 Lou’s Logging Railroad Car Barn
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Author Previous Topic: 1/72 Scale Narrow Gauge Modeling Topic Next Topic: Slater Creek Railway
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desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 12/01/2018 :  3:30:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In a November/December 2015 Narrow Gauge and Shortline Gazette I found an article about a Railroad Car Barn built by Terry A. Holley in HO scale, and this idea inspired me to build one for myself. Granted, I model the Northwest Logging, and there may not have been one of these in the colder parts of the country like the Pacific Northwest, but as I always say, “it’s my Railroad” and they had one.
Like Terry, I used the information from an edition of Ralph Clement Bryant's Logging, The Principles and General Methods of Operation in the United States, 1913, John Wiley & Sons. Inc. published by the National Model Railroad Association in 2008, using the books, plans and text describing a railroad "car barn" used in logging camps to stable and feed horses. Also, a help to me was the added information Terry used to build his car barn. See Terry’s model picture below. Terry’s HO scale model of the "car barn" shown on his layout with its roofs extended, and is complete with a coral.


Country: USA | Posts: 17451

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 12/01/2018 :  3:37:50 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Neat project. Just think, you never need to shovel out the stable. You just move the car.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 4144 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 12/01/2018 :  3:38:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here is a short excerpt from Ralph Clement Bryant's Logging book, explaining history and use of the car barn in logging. “Car barns are employed in some parts of the South and are considered very desirable by those who use them. A type of car barn used in Arkansas consists of a flat car 10-1/2 feet by 40 feet in size, with standard freight trucks on which is built a superstructure 9 feet from the floor to the eaves, with a gradually sloping peaked roof covered with tar paper. A passageway 6-1/2 feet wide runs through the center of the car which provides a place for storage of hay and grain, and on each side of it feed and hay boxes are arranged. A drop roof, supported on 3 inch by 6 inch by 8 foot scantling, covers stall space 10 feet wide beyond which is an extension roof covering an alley. Four double stalls are arranged on each side of the car separated by board partitions wired to supports on the car and under the outer edge of the drop roof. The stable floor is filled in with earth to give drainage. No protection other than the short extension roof is provided at the rear. The car is left on a temporary track and in one hour can be dismantled ready to move. A car of this character is serviceable where frequent changes of site are necessary. Corrals for idle animals are enclosed with panel’s five boards high and 16 feet long which are wired to posts set at proper intervals. The only labor required in moving to a new site is to cut the wire and load the panels on flat cars”.
These two drawings, of the end and side view frames, were included in the article to work from. I typed in new text for better legibility.





I’m using Northeastern Scale Lumber Recessed Roof HO scale #612 for the car barn roof, and Midwest Basswood #4303 for the start of the deck platform. A notch has been cutout from each side of the deck piece for the flatcar side sills.








Country: USA | Posts: 17451 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 12/01/2018 :  3:40:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Neat project. Just think, you never need to shovel out the stable. You just move the car.

Mike



Thanks Mike for your quick reply and post. I'm hoping to hear from you as I progress with this build.



Country: USA | Posts: 17451 Go to Top of Page

Ensign
Fireman

Posted - 12/01/2018 :  4:31:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Louis, well that's something you don't see everyday.
Looks like another fun project to watch!

Greg Shinnie



Country: Canada | Posts: 7780 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 12/01/2018 :  8:58:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ensign

Louis, well that's something you don't see everyday.
Looks like another fun project to watch!

Greg Shinnie


Thanks Greg, yes I also thought this was a unique piece of rolling stock that interested me enough to want one.
Thanks for comments and following along.



Country: USA | Posts: 17451 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 12/01/2018 :  9:00:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I drilled out #80 holes at a scale 10’ across the roof on both sides for the lift-up barn door hinge system using Detail Associates #2206 Eye Bolts. See hole mark locations, Five (5) on each side of the roof bottom edges.



After drilling out the holes for the eye bolts and glued into place, I cut eight (8), 10’ sections from K&S #8117 copper tubing for the top of the barn doors, and placed in-between the eye bolt hinges, four (4) on each side of the roof. Two (2) pieces of K&S .015 wire was cut to be used as the hinge pins. As seen in the picture below, bottom edge of roof shows the tube and wire used. Top edge of the roof shows the tube and wire hinge pin in place.
In Terry A. Holley’s build of the HO barn car, he used a different approach for his hinge system, but I found this to be the easiest method for me.




Country: USA | Posts: 17451 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 12/02/2018 :  06:59:21 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Always follow your threads Louis!

Carry on please....



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Tyson Rayles
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/02/2018 :  07:47:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Neat project!

Mike

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Bernd
Fireman



Posted - 12/02/2018 :  08:31:58 AM  Show Profile  Visit Bernd's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Another great SBS project. I'll be looking in to watch the progress.

Bernd


A PESSIMIST sees a dark tunnel
An OPTIMIST sees light at the end of the tunnel
A REALIST sees a freight train
The LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER sees three idiots standing on the tracks

Country: USA | Posts: 2687 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 12/02/2018 :  08:44:05 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That looks like a fun project, Lou.



Country: USA | Posts: 30834 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 12/02/2018 :  09:06:13 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Carl, Mike, Bernd and Bruce thanks for your kind comments/posts and following along.


Country: USA | Posts: 17451 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 12/02/2018 :  09:10:40 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I had these Center Sills and Body Bolsters in my parts collection, so instead of buying Queen Post, I’m just going with what I’ve got on hand for this build. Picture below shows these items, along with Kadee 501 Arch Bar trucks that will be used on this build.




Country: USA | Posts: 17451 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 12/02/2018 :  10:05:01 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Lou's 'parts collection' must be fantastic! Keeping track of it all must require a supercomputer .

Yet another very cool project from the guru of Portsmouth.

Jim



Country: USA | Posts: 3537 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 12/02/2018 :  1:12:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
this is an interesting build.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4734 Go to Top of Page

desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 12/02/2018 :  1:47:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by BurleyJim

Lou's 'parts collection' must be fantastic! Keeping track of it all must require a supercomputer .

Yet another very cool project from the guru of Portsmouth.

Jim


Since the early 70's my items, parts and kits have collected. Glad I did it then, prices now will kill us. Digging in to my parts boxes is like Christmas everyday.
Here are just a few bins of detail parts.




Edited by - desertdrover on 12/02/2018 3:47:24 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 17451 Go to Top of Page
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