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 scratchbuilding a 34' boxcar (styrene)
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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/05/2018 :  6:14:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Usually I've done scratchbuilt cars from wood, so I thought I'd try styrene.

The prototype is from John White's massive book on 19th century freight cars.


I built a subframe from .060 styrene, and a jig to construct the undercarriage.


Then I laminated the Evergreen car siding and started on the details (grey parts are from a Tichy old time car parts sprue.) I decided to do a simpler bottom track for the door.
data/deemery/201811518832_IMG_5850.jpg /

The car has an interesting roof.

I decided I could get something similar by using Evergreen .060 (corrugated) metal siding, and sanding down the top of the siding. To keep the siding piece flat against the sandpaper, I used double-sided tape to hold the styrene against a 1/2" piece of wood. The sanding pad is sandpaper glued to a stone (not ceramic) tile.


And the roof is attached, I think it came out pretty good.


Still to do: roofwalk, grab irons and brake gear. I'll paint the car body and undercarriage separately, and then glue them together.

dave
Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7321

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/05/2018 :  7:25:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Roofwalk, buffer block, some more door hardware added.


dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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railman28
Fireman



Posted - 11/05/2018 :  7:46:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good Dave. A nice diversion from track laying. Did you widen the body to accommodate the wider tread of most trucks or build it scale?

It's only make-believe

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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/05/2018 :  8:15:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Actually, it's a little more narrow than it should be. Prototype is 9', and mine is about 8'9" That's due to a mistake on my part in layout :-( But I put it next to a Silver Crash car (probably the most accurate of the resin cast early rail cars), and the slightly smaller width is not really noticeable (at least not as a mistake.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/05/2018 :  8:34:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Was that today's rainy day project? It looks nice, but the 7:25 PM photo makes me wonder if the roof pitch is a bit steep.


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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 11/05/2018 :  8:58:26 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

I like your car. Neat and clean.

It appears from the drawing that the car has a double board roof, the top boards having two grooves. Here’s a closeup from Voss’s book:



The purpose of the grooves may have been to direct water away from the joints between boards. The New York Central car in Fig 3.41 of White’s book has a similar roof.

Mike



_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Edited by - Michael Hohn on 11/06/2018 07:10:03 AM

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Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 11/06/2018 :  06:50:42 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A good looking build, Dave. How do you like building it in styrene?


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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/06/2018 :  08:09:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
James, roof pitch was determined from the drawings (a rise of 14" at the gable, if I remember correctly.) Mike, why confuse my clever roof with the facts?

Bill, styrene construction goes quickly, but you have to be careful with the solvents when gluing the little parts, to keep the glue from getting on the rest of the model. And you have to be careful the glue doesn't get on your fingers and transfer your fingerprints. The roofwalk supports were a particular challenge, a full "one cuss session" of frustration. Building the jigs from wood reduces, but does not eliminate, the problem of glued styrene sticking to the jig. I use 2 glues, straight MEK and Testor's Liquid. The latter gives me more working time, but I think my bottle has gone bad, it didn't "stick" as well as it should. (MEK flashes off quickly, and I think Testors is just diluted MEK.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

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BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/06/2018 :  09:42:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Nice looking car. I can't see from the photo, did you scribe the board lines into the styrene?

Jim



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desertdrover
Engineer



Posted - 11/06/2018 :  09:44:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great looking build Dave, nice work with styrene products. I see some thought went into that jig as well. You stated it is narrower than it should be, that Prototype is 9', and yours is about 8'9" due to a mistake in layout. Even the rivet counters won't see that once built I'm sure. I know most of my layout visitors wouldn't even see the work that went into the car, never mind the mistake in size.


Louis
Pacific Northwest Logging in the East Coast

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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/06/2018 :  10:20:34 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Jim, it's Evergreen's Car Siding (pre-scribed).

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7321 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 11/06/2018 :  12:48:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Please note, I wasn't saying something was "wrong" with the car. I well know the compromises we have to make with scale to get a fine running model and was only interested in the ones he had to make. Most of my car's are 6" to a foot too wide. I find the roof pitch looks too steep, if I don't

It's only make-believe

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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/06/2018 :  3:10:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
More-or-less done:

That's a Silver Crash MDT car to the left. (It needs those Red/White/Blue stripes.)

I forgot to include the buffer block when I drilled holes for the couplers, so I had to go back and drill and tap new holes there. The small NBW on the bolsters add some details to the side. I should add side straps, I might print those on paper and then drill for 'nail holes' Overall, despite some design and execution errors, this isn't bad at all.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7321 Go to Top of Page

Bill Gill
Fireman



Posted - 11/07/2018 :  06:43:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks good. I like styrene, it can be made to look like pretty much anything.

"design and execution errors" might simply be differences for a homebuilt car :)



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Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 11/07/2018 :  08:15:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
That turned out well. Every detail however small adds a lot. Styrene is better than wood when details are added near edges, where you can get breakout using wood. Also the scribing is more subtle.

Mike



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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/08/2018 :  4:12:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
For the record, that's 46 (Tichy .020) rivets on the (cardboard) corner braces.

Off to the paint shop, I think.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7321 Go to Top of Page
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