Railroad Line Forums - Small Layout Design Help/Challenge - c.1905 Pennsy
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 4 | Anonymous Members: 1 | Guests: 126 ]  [ Total: 131 ]  [ Newest Member: Bigbandito ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Early Rail Forum
 Small Layout Design Help/Challenge - c.1905 Pennsy
Previous Page | Next Page
 New Topic |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Previous Topic: Promised Update... Topic Next Topic: Offical Railway Equipment Register Measurments?
Page: of 7

RyanAK
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/07/2019 :  11:45:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, Sanborn maps are available for Dushore for 1885, 1892, 1897 and 1911. Penn State has a pretty extensive collection of Sanborn maps for PA online. Here's the link to the set of Dushore.

https://digital.libraries.psu.edu/digital/collection/maps1/search/searchterm/Dushore!Sanborn%20Fire%20Insurance%20Maps/field/geogra!collec/mode/all!exact/conn/and!or/order/nosort


Designing a 1905-ish Pennsylvania Short Line
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51030&whichpage=1

Country: USA | Posts: 113 Go to Top of Page

RyanAK
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/07/2019 :  11:46:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The main PSU Sanborn page:

https://libraries.psu.edu/about/collections/sanborn-fire-insurance-maps


Designing a 1905-ish Pennsylvania Short Line
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51030&whichpage=1

Country: USA | Posts: 113 Go to Top of Page

RyanAK
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/18/2019 :  1:00:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I finally identified the ĎMystery Buildingí!!



Itís a sawmill. And I found TWO images of it!









How neat! Sunday I hope to visit with the local NRHS to see what information they might have. And today Iíll be in Sonestown. I love this stuff!


Designing a 1905-ish Pennsylvania Short Line
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51030&whichpage=1

Country: USA | Posts: 113 Go to Top of Page

robchant
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/18/2019 :  2:39:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wow ... great find! I also know the thrill of 'discovery' ... it is a wonderful feeling. Congrats!


Edited by - robchant on 01/18/2019 3:56:28 PM

Country: Canada | Posts: 1157 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/18/2019 :  3:55:47 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Congratulations!

And it doesnít look ridiculously large either.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 5101 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/18/2019 :  4:36:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's a rather long passenger train at the station. Looks like it might be 8-9 cars. Even if the cars in the back of the photo are attached to a different loco, that's still a lot of cars for "the middle of nowhere". I'm guessing this might have been a tourist train, maybe even a special, up to the resort of Eagle's Mere. (I visited Eagle's Mere once, 40 years ago. Don't remember much, except it was typical 'PA north woods'.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7651 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/18/2019 :  5:57:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Congratulations!

And it doesnít look ridiculously large either.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 5101 Go to Top of Page

RyanAK
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/19/2019 :  10:27:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Rob! Thanks, Mike! It is neat when you come across a piece of information that helps to further define a modeling project. Iíve been told by a local guy that the WD&Lís tracks ended at Loganton at an engine house. Either that is inaccurate, the engine house hasnít be built yet in these photos, or one of the structures of the sawmill is actually an engine house. Hmmm.

I think the image of the baseball game is just so interesting!


Designing a 1905-ish Pennsylvania Short Line
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51030&whichpage=1

Country: USA | Posts: 113 Go to Top of Page

RyanAK
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/19/2019 :  10:51:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, if youíre talking Sonestown ...

(Iím actually sitting in my truck looking at the Sonestown depot as I write this...)

Eagles Mere has three or four LUXURY resort hotels on the lake. Big ones. Like, 300 rooms, Gilded Age big. Plus all the Ďcottagesí built there by captains of industry. 3 stories high with staff to take care of them. During the heyday and height of the season, the Reading was running special trains of Pullman sleepers from Philadelphia to Halls, where the Williamsport and North Branch would take them to Sonestown. From there, the EMRR narrow gauge finished the journey to Eagles Mere.

The W&NB also was known to run quite a few excursion / picnic trains. This is one short line that really thrived on passenger service.

Today, Sonestown is a sleepy north country hamlet of a few hundred people. Post Office, minit mart, the Sonestown Inn, and not much else. But once, it really boomed.


Designing a 1905-ish Pennsylvania Short Line
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51030&whichpage=1

Country: USA | Posts: 113 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 01/19/2019 :  12:17:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ryan said:

"Today, Sonestown is a sleepy north country hamlet of a few hundred people. Post Office, minit mart, the Sonestown Inn, and not much else. But once, it really boomed."

So true. That happened all along the rail lines. Somewhat a familiar pattern:

* Industry choked for lack of transportation.

* Arrival of the rails supplies transportation.

* Industries have transport, thus began to grow.

* Influx of people to work and thus build/enlarge towns.

* Industry thrives.

* Industry peaks due to various factors (supply of raw materials being one of the chief reasons).

* Industry starts downward trend as raw materials dwindle. Downsizing of work force, those downsized often move out of area to find work.

* Long (or not so long) decline as the circumstances continue to alter, typically on the downward side, and more often than not, leading to closing(s).

* No longer a need for rail service, so the rail line folds and rails are pulled.

Thus, I learned long ago that the most enjoyable and engaging part of a rail's history is found in points 1 thru 4-5.

That could be part of what draws us as rail historians to the liking of TOC19: A place that is Nowhere now, was Somewhere then... with rail service even!

Andre





Country: | Posts: 794 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 01/19/2019 :  12:52:20 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Some very rural lines in the northeast were built in part to serve resorts, parks and lakes.




Country: USA | Posts: 5101 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 01/19/2019 :  1:54:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike:

Yes, we had at least one such line in the Ozarks... but it ran its course a whole lot faster than the line's that were running to the timber mills/etc! Only one such road readily comes to mind: The very short (5 miles I think?) "Monte Ne RR".

The Ozarks were always more financially "less than" other parts of the USA. (Still pretty much the same today.) Thus, generally speaking, the railroads of the region were never able to really capitalize on the "resort" thing as much as other areas. However, in the "hey day", Eureka Springs had a good amount of resort traffic.

However, I digress from the topic at hand.

Andre



Edited by - OK Hogger on 01/19/2019 1:55:05 PM

Country: | Posts: 794 Go to Top of Page

RyanAK
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/19/2019 :  1:54:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Story of America in the early 20th century, eh? I find it endlessly fascinating.

Took the long way home from the cabin and went through Loganton. Also a quiet village in the high mountain plains of Sugar Valley. I love the character and the pace of life here and could make it my home. Itís pretty remote, and one would certainly need to be comfortable with the lack of conveniences and services to make a go of it.

Took some photos while there. Thanks for following along. Iím enjoying our conversation.

1907


Approximately the same scene in 2019.


Location of the depot.




View looking from the depot towards the saw mill.



Snow is starting to fly. Samantha and the babies are visiting family, so the house is empty. Time to put a fire in the stove, pour a glass, and finish up the Bitter Creek box car build.


Designing a 1905-ish Pennsylvania Short Line
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51030&whichpage=1

Country: USA | Posts: 113 Go to Top of Page

OK Hogger
Crew Chief

Posted - 01/19/2019 :  1:57:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Neat pictures! Very similar to scenes found in the Ozarks!

Small town life is cool. Been there, done that, loved it.

Andre



Country: | Posts: 794 Go to Top of Page

RyanAK
Engine Wiper

Posted - 01/23/2019 :  4:05:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The town we live in now is about 2,500 people. Loganton is the biggest town in Sugar Valley... which is 20 miles long and ~1 mile wide. There are less people in the entirety of Sugar Valley than in Mifflinburg. I think the village of Loganton's current population is less than 500. Population has been pretty flat for over 100 years. It really is remote, even though I-80 passes within 1 mile... and there's even an exit!

I just think it's so cool to visit these places, historic photos in hand, and think back. In a place like Sugar Valley, you don't even have to suspend reality to be taken back. In the first 2019 photo of Loganton above, that little black speck on the road up near the town... is a horse and buggy.

How neat?


Designing a 1905-ish Pennsylvania Short Line
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=51030&whichpage=1

Country: USA | Posts: 113 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 7 Previous Topic: Promised Update... Topic Next Topic: Offical Railway Equipment Register Measurments?  
 New Topic |   Reply to Topic | 
Previous Page | Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-19 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.35 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000