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Author Previous Topic: o scale swsm oneills fabricating Topic Next Topic: final pics of the scratch built bed and breakfast
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George D
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Premium Member


Posted - 10/02/2018 :  11:19:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Tom and Phillip.

You need to borrow your daughters machine, Tom. You'll find it's useful and fun.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14933 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/07/2018 :  09:06:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I completed the diorama I've been referring to. The Cricut was an invaluable tool for building the truss rafters Making window panes, cutting plywood and for painting the sign on the fence.

Here are some pictures.











George



Country: USA | Posts: 14933 Go to Top of Page

wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 10/07/2018 :  10:38:02 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very nice, George. You are really getting your money's worth out of the Cricut machine.

Chuck



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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/07/2018 :  11:16:18 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Chuck. I'm loving the machine.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14933 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 10/07/2018 :  11:29:21 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
George,

Very realistic-looking scene. Good choice of colors; I associate blue like that with small industrial buildings or automotive shops, like you’ve done.

Mike



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George D
Moderator

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Posted - 10/07/2018 :  7:59:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Mike.

George



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Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 10/08/2018 :  10:15:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Very nice, get out the lawn mower.


Country: USA | Posts: 5112 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/08/2018 :  10:55:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Frank. I'm always having to tend to the static grass.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14933 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 10/08/2018 :  1:38:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George, it really came out great looking. The roof looks like a lot of work was put in. Even though the Cutter helped you still put in a lot of work and the result is ;just excellent. Thank you for sharing with us how these new machines can help us.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4949 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/09/2018 :  09:56:53 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Robert. The Cricut sure made things easier with the jigs and cutting the gussets. I never would have tried that if I had to cut all those gussets by hand. There are 242 of them!

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14933 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/09/2018 :  10:11:17 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Nice work George.

Any chance you could put together a small list of "do's & don'ts" here for the Cricut?

or maybe "can" and "cannots".....



Country: USA | Posts: 3160 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/09/2018 :  12:38:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Carl. The machine does have some very useful features, but it also has some limitations. Let me think on it.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14933 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/09/2018 :  12:49:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George, Glad to see the spectacular results. Think about how much you learned in such short (well, maybe ) time. Outstanding!

Jim



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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/09/2018 :  4:46:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Jim.

Carl, after 10 months or so of playing with my Cricut machine, here are my observations. They are not in any particular order, just as they come to my mind, which may give you some insight to my thought processes.

1. I've built a number of structures using cardstock as the primary construction material. I design the buildings using AutoSketch for my drawings, print the drawings on cardstock (Bristol paper) and cut it out with a ruler and a #11 blade. The Cricut looked like a logical tool to do my cutting, and that's why I bought it.
2. You need to use CAD drawings as input into the machine. I've demonstrated in the clinics I've given that you can make a drawing with a pencil and ruler, scan it, save it as a JPEG file and use that for cutting. One of the good features of the machine is it's cutting accuracy and this type drawing doesn't use the machine's full potential.
2. The machine is limited to the materials it can cut and the thickness of those materials. It cuts paper, cardstock, wood, styrene and vinyl. The maximum thickness I've cut is 0.040” styrene and it doesn't cut it completely through. For thicker styrene, the cutting is really the scribe and break technique. The groves made by the blade do provide an easy guide for further passes with a #11 blade. This is the technique used for small inside cuts like window and door openings. The same applies to sheets of wood siding, except that scribe and break doesn't work here. Follow up passes with a knife complete the cuts.
3. The limitation in thickness gave me the idea of making the truss rafter jig by scribing the styrene and using these marks as a guide for placement of the wood pieces.
4. Inside corners are not completely cut on thicker material. A little extra time is required, using the knife point to finish the cuts in the corners. It's not difficult - simply poke the knife into the corner. On paper or thin cardstock this isn't a problem.
5. It's a big time saver when repetitive cuts are needed. I commented to Robert that I had to cut 242 gussets for the rafters and within that there were six different gusset shapes. I hate to think how long it would have taken to cut them by hand. Once I sorted out the size of the individual window panes in the building, I cut a bunch of them to glue into the frames – a time saver and easy for the machine.
6. The first building I made with the machine was a lobster shack http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50263. The machine's accuracy allowed me to cut openings for the windows and doors in the walls and cut windows and doors that were an exact fit in these openings. Cricut will make very accurate repeatable cuts.
7. The machine requires an internet connection to work. The cutting program (Design Space) resides in the cloud. I wanted to demonstrate it at the train club but we don't have an WiFi in the club. Cricut has an app for smart phones, so I was able to demonstrate the machine using my iPhone.
8. The CAD input to the machine is an SVG file. This means I have to copy and paste from my drawing to Inkscape (free CAD program). Once pasted I simply save the drawing and load it into the Cricut cutting program. I know very little about the workings of Inkscape, but that didn't matter until I tried loading words for sign stencils . I won't go into the details, but I had to learn a few basic things about Inkscape to get things to work. It was well worth sorting that out when I saw the capability I now had for making realistic painted signs.
9. I've just done some simple signs, but the potential for more complex designs are exciting. I know there are more uses for the Cricut than I have found. I'm simply waiting to run into the next “need” that Cricut can solve. I know the more I build the more I will find new uses. I'm sure there are others using the machine that have solved many of these “needs”. There just isn't much interchange between us modelers with the Cricut machines. In fact the only interchange of ideas I've found comes from a Facebook group called “Modeling with Cricut the Explore”.

Random thoughts and I'm sure more will come to mind. I find it fascinating to play with the machine. I still have a lot to learn. In fact, I gave two clinics at the NER convention in New Jersey last month. The cuts I made in the first clinic weren't real good. I changed cutting blades and the cuts in the second clinic were just perfect. That day, I learned how to tell when the cutting blade is dull.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14933 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/09/2018 :  7:19:10 PM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
WOW George thank you for that synopsis!
Very enlightening...

You get an A+ on your paper.



Country: USA | Posts: 3160 Go to Top of Page
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