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Author Previous Topic: I weathered a BIG engine... Topic Next Topic: SierraWest and J.E. Mortons Brass & Iron Foundry
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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/09/2018 :  07:25:25 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Chuck, I'm not sure if I'm nuts for doing it or it's driving me nuts.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14804 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/14/2018 :  12:37:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's another example of cutting pieces to fit in window openings. In addition to cutting out individual window panes, the machine can also be used for plywood temporarily replacing the panes.



Because of the lighting, you can't see that there are some window panes in the top row of windows.

The most difficult part of filing windows with “glass” or wood is getting the measurements right. It's a several step process of measuring the opening, making a drawing and then cutting a sample from cardstock. This is repeated till the cardstock cut is an exact fit. I'm working down to 1” (HO scale) accuracy. Maybe I shouldn't say difficult. With CAD making an adjustment of an inch is no more difficult than making an adjustment of one foot. It can take more time getting the sample right than doing the final cut and gluing it in place.

By the way, the plywood is 1/64" thick plywood.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14804 Go to Top of Page

talltim
New Hire



Posted - 08/28/2018 :  11:00:04 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My wife has a Cricut. I keep meaning to persuade her to cut stuff for me.

Tim David

Country: United Kingdom | Posts: 10 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 08/28/2018 :  1:15:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Give it a try, Tim. You might find it useful.

George



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George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/03/2018 :  7:26:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've started cutting vinyl on my Cricut machine. It doesn't pertain to this model I'm working on, but it's about using a Cricut cutting machine, so I'm including it here. I wish I had discovered this earlier since it would have worked on this project, but I'm too far down the road to use it now.

Someone did a posting on the Facebook group, Modeling with the Cricut Explore, showing how he had used vinyl to represent the metal framing on a large station window. I've had experience with the vinyl used for race car graphics, so I thought I'd try scaling it down to HO scale.

Something that has interested me is painting signs directly on the side of a building. The best I could work out was either using a decal or rub-on letters. There was no way I'd try to cut a stencil by hand. However, now I have Cricut. The vinyl is mounted to a paper backing and the Cricut cut setting is light so it only cuts through the vinyl, not the backing (called a “kiss cut”). It's hard to get a picture of the initial cut, but this should give you an idea how it looks.



The vinyl comes in a 12” x 24” piece, so I cut small pieces from this for my signs.

The first step after cutting is removing the vinyl pieces you don't want (called “weeding”).



Notice the centers in the letters D, A, B and R stay fastened to the backing. This is then covered with a clear transfer sheet, that has an adhesive on the bottom, touching the vinyl.



It's pretty hard to make out the letters in the picture.

The next step is to burnish the transfer sheet down onto the vinyl, so when the vinyl's backing is removed, everything sticks to the transfer sheet. This was then placed on a piece of wood siding and given a good burnishing so there were no gaps between the vinyl and the wood. The transfer sheet is then carefully removed leaving he vinyl stencil fastened to the wood.

This picture shows my first try and my second try.



I painted this with a rattle can and on my first try (top) some of the paint bled under the stencil. On my second try, I first sprayed it with Dullcote, then sprayed it with white. The Dullcote prevented any bleeding under the stencil.

A similar procedure was used for a brick wall. I fist sprayed the brick sheeting with a red paint. A white rectangle, slightly larger than the lettering was painted on the wall.



The stencil for this was opposite the one for a wood wall. The letters had to be fastened to the white area. This is the stencil after weeding. The top piece is the “weed” and is tossed out.



The bottom piece was covered with a clear transfer tape and the vinyl's backing removed. This was fastened over the white painted area. The following pictures show my first attempt. I included the rectangular border in my second cut. It works as a mask and it helped align the stencil on the brick sheet.

This how the stencil looked on my first try:


The area to be painted black was masked off.



The letters were picked off the wall and this is how my first try turned out:


As you can see, the white wasn't completely covered with the black paint.

Here's my second try:


The brick wall was easier than the wall with siding. It took a lot of care to get the stencil snugged down on the wood surface. Even so, it wasn't all that difficult.

This lettering is 2' high in HO. I'm sure most prototype lettering would be larger. Larger letters would be easier to work with. Thinking about size, colors and a variety of fonts available, there is a lot of potential in cutting stencils. I'm sure my next structure will have at least one sign painted on a wall.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14804 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 09/03/2018 :  8:32:07 PM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Really appreciate all the investigative work you're doing with this machine George .

Very informative. Thank you!



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wvrr
Fireman



Posted - 09/04/2018 :  08:48:40 AM  Show Profile  Visit wvrr's Homepage  Reply with Quote
That is really interesting, George. Your point about the variety of fonts really is a good point.

Chuck



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friscomike
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 09/04/2018 :  09:03:38 AM  Show Profile  Visit friscomike's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Howdy George,

Nice work and thanks for sharing another use for the Cricut in step by step instructions.

Happy rails,
Mike




Okie logging camp diner (http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50236) and Okie logging camp kitchen: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=47400&whichpage=1

Country: USA | Posts: 970 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 09/04/2018 :  10:40:09 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Carl. I'm having tons of fun with it.

Chuck, sometime in the future I'll be playing around with different fonts and sizes. I'm sure some fonts are too intricate to cut, but it will be interesting to see the limit.

Thanks, Mike. As I said to Carl, It's fun.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14804 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/01/2018 :  2:08:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The structure I'm building is going to be part of a diorama. I just finished a wood fence for the diorama and used the vinyl stencil technique to add a simple sign to the fence.

I built the fence over a drawing I made.



After painting, I added the vinyl stencil.




I sprayed it with Testor's Dulcote to seal the edges of the letters to prevent the paint from migrating under the vinyl.

Here's the finished fence. I like the way the centers of the O's, D's and all are retained in place without the pesky stencil pieces holding them in place.



George



Country: USA | Posts: 14804 Go to Top of Page

Frank Palmer
Fireman



Posted - 10/01/2018 :  2:33:02 PM  Show Profile  Visit Frank Palmer's Homepage  Reply with Quote
You are just killing it with that Cricut.


Country: USA | Posts: 4986 Go to Top of Page

friscomike
Crew Chief

Premium Member


Posted - 10/01/2018 :  5:11:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit friscomike's Homepage  Reply with Quote
George,

Terrific work with the Cricut. You are inspiring me to get mine out and emulate your magic.

Have fun,
Mike




Okie logging camp diner (http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=50236) and Okie logging camp kitchen: http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=47400&whichpage=1

Country: USA | Posts: 970 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 10/02/2018 :  09:54:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Frank and Mike.

Dig it out, Mike. It has a lot of potential.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14804 Go to Top of Page

tloc
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/02/2018 :  10:06:22 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
George, you make it read and look easy. I gave a Circuit last year to the daughter for her crafting business. I need some signs. Thank for sharing your ways, time I learn to use the machine!

TomO



Country: USA | Posts: 2370 Go to Top of Page

Philip
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 10/02/2018 :  11:03:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice project George!

Philip



Country: USA | Posts: 2596 Go to Top of Page
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