Railroad Line Forums - The Tenement and other builds - The grocery
Railroad Line Forums
Username:
Password:
Save Password


Register
Forgot Password?
  Home   Forums   Events Calendar   Sponsors   Support the RRLine   Guestbook   FAQ     Register
Active Topics | Active Polls | Resources | Members | Online Users | Live Chat | Avatar Legend | Search | Statistics
Photo Album | File Lister | File Library
[ Active Members: 6 | Anonymous Members: 0 | Guests: 113 ]  [ Total: 119 ]  [ Newest Member: rsmokingus ]
 All Forums
 Model Railroad Forums
 Startin' from Scratch
 The Tenement and other builds - The grocery
Next Page
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Author Topic Next Topic: On building MoW cars
Page: of 40

Terrell
Fireman

Posted - 06/14/2018 :  10:42:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
More to come.

Edited by - Terrell on 10/23/2018 2:33:35 PM

Country: | Posts: 1682

Terrell
Fireman

Posted - 06/14/2018 :  10:51:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
No, I'm not challenging anyone to build this, but it is going to be a challenge to me.

I found these photos on Shorpy probably 10 years ago. And they have been following me ever since.







I have no emotional attachment to this other than I've just always liked it. After-all it's in Massachusetts and I'm a long way south of there. I've thought about building it numerous times but was always overcome by the challenging details. I know my limitations and have come to respect them. But recently I decided, "what the heck?" maybe I can at least get a reasonable facsimile of it, and maybe I was just bored with doing layout scenery. So that's where we are.


More to come later.



Country: | Posts: 1682 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/14/2018 :  11:20:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
That's a style that you'd expect to see in pretty much any well-developed urban area in the late 19th/early 20th century. A lot of New England mills moved south to the Piedmont in NC/SC/GA when labor costs and refurbishment costs got too high in the Northeast. They'd bring these style of tenements with them for employee housing.

I'm looking forward to seeing your build, and in particular to see how you tackle the mansard roofs.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7181 Go to Top of Page

sgtbob
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/14/2018 :  11:47:33 AM  Show Profile  Visit sgtbob's Homepage  Reply with Quote
What a fantastic idea for a model build, I love it. I am tempted too but it would be too big in my scale.

Looks like there once were shutters on those windows, you can see it by how the paint weathered.

I'm originally from Massachusetts and there were many large tenements in my home town but they
were quite different from these.

Bob


http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=30102&whichpage=1
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=38921
http://www.railroad-line.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=45371
http://www.freewebs.com/santmod/

Country: USA | Posts: 3556 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 06/14/2018 :  1:24:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This looks like an interesting build to follow. You have a lot of little details to work on.

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14641 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 06/14/2018 :  1:53:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Incredible! I found & saved those as well, and love them too....

However Shorpy coerced me to another (but similar) project...

But I'm not starting till later this year....Good luck Fred. I'll be watching



Country: USA | Posts: 2978 Go to Top of Page

Terrell
Fireman

Posted - 06/14/2018 :  1:53:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave, I'm trying not to think about the roof. (But of course I am).

Bob, I noticed the weathering pattern, too. But didn't put 2 and 2 together. You may be right. In doing some other house detective work, I'm actually only building what is seen in the picture which I think is, at best, only 1/2 the structure.


Yes, George, plenty of details.


I guess I should have mentioned earlier, this will be in O scale.


Thanks, Carl. We cross posted.



Edited by - Terrell on 06/14/2018 1:55:04 PM

Country: | Posts: 1682 Go to Top of Page

Guff
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/14/2018 :  2:37:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Fred,
Great design with a lot of added trim and detail! Looking forward to your build!
Dave



Country: USA | Posts: 1529 Go to Top of Page

Pennman
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/14/2018 :  10:45:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Fred,

I will be following along with your build.

Rich



Country: USA | Posts: 3602 Go to Top of Page

quartergauger48
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/14/2018 :  10:58:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Fred, knowing your workmanship and overall skills for details this will be(as often said these days by the younger crowd) "NO PROBLEM" build for you. I love it too as this is real `Americana'and was in every city coast to coast. I cant wait to see your magic at work once again'.


Country: USA | Posts: 5673 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 06/14/2018 :  11:11:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Should be an interesting build for sure.

Jerry

"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 10788 Go to Top of Page

Terrell
Fireman

Posted - 06/15/2018 :  09:09:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks to all for the interest and for following along. I hope I can keep your interest.

I thought I'd start with the Bill of Materials, at least what I know so far.

Black foamcore.
Cardstock
Cardboard (non-corrugated)
Watercolor paper
Square wood dowels
Basswood sheets (varying thicknesses)
Evergreen Scale Models styrene strips (various)
Styrene tubing (various)
Styrene channel
Dollhouse cornice dentil
Vinyl floor tile
Tag holder
Extruded foam insulation board (probably)

Everything but the kitchen sink (and I've got my eye on it).



Country: | Posts: 1682 Go to Top of Page

Carl B
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 06/15/2018 :  09:23:50 AM  Show Profile  Visit Carl B's Homepage  Reply with Quote
No Tichy or Grandt Line on the list.

Does this mean you're scratching all those cool & sophisticated windows and doors?



Country: USA | Posts: 2978 Go to Top of Page

Terrell
Fireman

Posted - 06/15/2018 :  09:55:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm afraid so, Carl. That's where the styrene strips come into play. But it's not that bad, there's only 22, upper and lower sashes, on the front wall. Not including the two sets of double doors. 6 windows on each end wall, upper and lower sashes. And, then, there's the dormers on the roof...……….


Did I mention that this was going to be a challenge?



Country: | Posts: 1682 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 06/15/2018 :  10:07:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Some thoughts on Mansard Roofs... I did a thread on a mansard roof building here: http://www.kitforums.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=6843&sid=52f0af45987e9a1ad8f308858312e60c

For the roof line, I cut the subroof formers on a (full-size) table saw. I then notched it for the dormers on a modeler's table saw.

The more common approach is to construct a subroof with formers for the slope/curve. It would be best to get those laser-cut. Second-best is to use techniques where you glue together a bunch of pieces of thin wood or even cardboard, cut the roof shape from one side, and then cut the individual formers away from the glued-together set.

SS Ltd has some great castings of fancy Victorian windows that work well for mansard dormers. Craig Bisgeier produced a master with the roofline that fit the subroof, and then cast dormers (including the hole for the window) from resin.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7181 Go to Top of Page

Terrell
Fireman

Posted - 06/15/2018 :  11:04:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks, Dave! This will be a learning experience, for sure. For starters, I didn't know they were call "Mansard roofs".





Country: | Posts: 1682 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 40 Topic Next Topic: On building MoW cars  
 New Topic |   New Poll New Poll |   Reply to Topic | 
Next Page
Jump To:
Railroad Line Forums © 2000-19 Railroad Line Co. Go To Top Of Page
Steam was generated in 0.36 seconds. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000