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Author Previous Topic: Avalon Tippi Foam Cutter Topic Next Topic: Rebuilding my T&P layout HO scale
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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/12/2018 :  7:36:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was looking at track in the small yard. I think I can fit a 9" turntable as shown, without compromising reach to the yard throat turnout. Access will be from a turnout on the very front track of the yard.

Doing so breaks a whole bunch of yard design rules, but it's better than nothing!

edit Here's a photo showing the TT location. That plate is 8 1/2" in diameter, so it's a good mock-up for a 9" turntable :-)


Otherwise, I've been building FastTracks curved turnouts (4) and #4 turnouts (for the small yard ladder)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 05/13/2018 2:04:45 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7426 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 05/12/2018 :  10:36:42 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

That looks like the best solution for space. It also works well for operations.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4668 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/16/2018 :  3:12:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've been reducing a piece of 4' x 8' 1/4" hardboard to strips and sawdust:

Craig Bisgeier will help me turn those strips into roadbed splines this weekend.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7426 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 05/16/2018 :  4:39:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I salute you Dave! Good Show there. That looks like a real pain especially with a circular hand saw. Spline roadbeds are super strong for sure. I know many swear by them but I think they're over kill.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4945 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/16/2018 :  4:46:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I used the circular saw and a Kreg jig to turn the 4'x8' into 1'x8'. Then I reduced the 12"x8' into 1"x8'. I thought about a jig for the circular saw, but decided the table saw would be better. Handling those 8' long sections is a pain, even with a couple of roller stands.

The advantage of splines is they introduce natural easements. And I wasn't looking forward to trying to map the track plan onto sheets of plywood, then cutting out the roadbed with my lousy jigsaw… I'll report back on how well the spline idea works.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 05/16/2018 4:47:45 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7426 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 05/16/2018 :  5:17:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm sure it will work well Dave. Especially with Craig there to guild you through it. It is a different mind set as laying out the track onto a board surface.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4945 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/20/2018 :  4:05:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Quick update: Craig, David White and I spent all day yesterday and got most of the spines for the main line in place. Today Craig and I got in a half day, first cutting more spline then adding the passing sidings. Photos to follow probably tomorrow (I'm still having some computer problems and can't post photos right now.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7426 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/21/2018 :  08:52:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Laptop is back fully functioning, so I can discuss the spline work from the weekend.


There are 6 x 1/4" wide splines for HO standard gauge. The pattern is to lay down one of the middle splines, using screws driven into the riser to hold it into position. We glued a second spline to that one, so we had a length just short of 16'. We checked the curve layout, then started adding additional splines on either side. We're using an industrial hot glue gun (I got a starter set for about $100 that included the gun, tips and glue sticks. I bought extra glue sticks, which I knew we'd need.)

We used a 28" radius FastTracks QuickStick set to make sure we stayed above that minimum radius.

Once all 6 splines are glued together, the roadbed is pretty sturdy and firm. A couple of places we tacked it to the risers to keep it from moving. We made sure that the joints between pieces of spline didn't align. The hardboard spline itself was easy to snap.


There were 3 of us on Saturday. Craig Bisgeier manned the hot glue gun (with gloves and long sleeved shirt.) Craig would apply glue along part of the spline, and hold it until David White and I got the clamps applied. We had about 40-50 clamps, which was plenty. (I don't think you could do this with less than 20 clamps, but those orange tipped spring clamps are cheap.)

In a couple locations, I wanted to ensure I had a straight section. So we tack-glued a piece of wood to hold the first spline straight and added a couple more splines until the correct profile was locked in place.


For turnouts, Craig had some paper templates of blocks that set the diverging route splines. We drew those on 3/4" stock (actually 3 pieces of 1/4" plywood glued together, because that's what I happened to have.) We then cut these out on my small band saw.

And glued them in place.

We used carpenter glue for this and let them dry overnight.

Then we aligned and glued the center splines to the middle slot in the template. We added splines until the diverging route was complete. For passing sidings, we cut spacer blocks (5/8") and started with the spline closest to the existing track.




At the end of the long siding, I decided to use homasote-over-plywood section at the very end. Underneath this piece are the light switches for the room, so this makes it easier to reach them. Plus the plywood block is a lot sturdier in case that section gets bumped.


I'll have to rework one section, where we forgot to check the radius and it's way too sharp. (That's the lead from the main to that long siding along the stair wall.)

My verdict on splines: If you have the tools (table saw to cut the splines, in particular), this works quite well. It goes quickly, particularly with 3 people working on it. You get into quite a rhythm. We did the main line (first photo) in about 7 hours Saturday. The bandsaw was very useful for the turnout templates, but you could cut those with a jigsaw if that's all you had. I used a reciprocating trim saw (instead of a jigsaw) to trim some of the splines where we wanted a precise fit, and to cut the slots into the homasote-and-plywood sections.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 05/21/2018 08:56:04 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7426 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 05/21/2018 :  09:58:27 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

It looks nice and smooth. I like your turnout solution in particular.

Sounds like the order of the day was straight from the Beverly Hillbillies: “clamp it”

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4668 Go to Top of Page

George D
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 05/21/2018 :  10:07:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Splines are a great idea, Dave. I don't understand how you fasten the first spline to the riser. Do you run a screw into the i/4" spline?

George



Country: USA | Posts: 14933 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/21/2018 :  11:24:47 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The first 2 (center) splines actually started from the small yard (see previous photos). I cut a 1/2" wide slot about 2" long into the plywood&homasote. Underneath that I screwed a shelf for the spline to sit upon. (It's not a coincidence that my spines are 1" tall and the plywood&homasote combination is also 1"). Then we hot-glued that first spline into place, and laid in a piece (not glued) of spline to fill the 1/2" gap. You can see this approach in the last photo of the previous post, where there's a 2-spline wide tongue that anchors the spline into another piece of plywood&homasote.

Without that, yes, I'd start the first spline by putting a temporary screw into a riser, tacking the first spline into place, and then moving from there.

Here's the hot glue gun I'm using, it works great:

I got it from hotmelt.com

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 05/21/2018 11:38:07 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7426 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 05/21/2018 :  11:39:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks like Real Progress, Dave! Congratulations! The switch process is innovative, and will be filed away for future use.

Will the splines now require a visit from a belt sander, or did they stay where they belonged?

Love the turntable, too! Probably just the right size!

And as Mike mentioned, Clamp It, Jed!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 6391 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 05/21/2018 :  12:04:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice looking roadbed. Looks like it won't go anywhere. It seems it was a lot of work though and would be difficult to modify if you want to change your track plan.

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4945 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 05/21/2018 :  12:30:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The belt sander is needed to level off the top of the splines, I forgot to mention that step. I'm going to find out just how hard it is to adjust things, when I redo the one section from the main line turnout to the long siding. Looking very carefully at this, somehow the turnout frog angle is mis-set. I think what we have would be a #1 frog :-(

My late brother, professional carpenter, said "You can't be too rich, too strong, or have too many clamps."

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 05/21/2018 12:31:35 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7426 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 05/21/2018 :  6:48:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looks great Dave! I've never done splines before but can definitely see the advantage. Your moving along quickly!

Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13727 Go to Top of Page
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