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Author Topic Next Topic: Tunnel liner
Page: of 39

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/31/2019 :  09:15:25 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Looking good, Dave. Itís going to be an iconic scene.

Made any decisions on the backdrop?

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/31/2019 :  09:47:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I have some 'bendable MDF' arriving (supposedly) today. I'll see just how well it bends. Then I have to figure out how to attach the MDF to the benchwork or wall, and then the backdrops to the MDF (probably in that order, because of the need to get the coving right first.)

The other thing I'm pondering is the geology underneath the stream. My Woodland Scenics rock molds are pretty much 'generic', no obvious stratification. And that's probably OK for this part of the country, where the rocks are mostly basement rocks. But the actual Sandy Lake PA sits on sedimentary rock. So for this part, I'll probably go with the generics. I still need to decide what color to paint the rocks. (The problem is, the more I learn about geology, the more it will bother me if it doesn't look right!!! :-) )

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 07/31/2019 09:48:01 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7741 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 07/31/2019 :  12:45:19 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

I would think the mdf requires a pretty stout frame to keep it in shape Here's an idea:



The top and bottom profiles would be plywood, as thin as possible to keep weight down. No matter what, I think the assembly would be rather heavy.

On rock molds and color, this could be a real block for both of us. It's hard to find molds representing sedimentary rocks. Are there small molds appropriate for N-scale that if strung along in a line would make the required layers?

Color: I've used graphics software to sample colors on photos to determine rgb color codes. If you have a photo of the rock you want to match, perhaps you could sample it in several places and average the results, use the program to print out a square of the average color, and match it at a paint store. That assumes you will have more than one area with that rock color.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 5258 Go to Top of Page

nortonw
Section Hand

Posted - 07/31/2019 :  6:31:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I believe Michael is right. MDF is a pretty dense material. Depending on how thick your 'bendable' MDF is, it could be difficult to work with, mostly due to the weight. If you assemble it off-layout, getting it into place could be problematic, due to the lack of access to the corner. It is probably worth the experiment though, so by all means, let us know how it goes.


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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 07/31/2019 :  6:48:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's the curveable MDF, from the rear. You can see how it's milled so it will curve but remain rigid.


And from the front, just set into place. There are some pieces on the benchwork that hold the MDF tight to the right curve (I did one of them so it would pivot to hold the MDF into shape.) I still need to trim it a bit before making this permanent.


dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7741 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/03/2019 :  3:31:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Backdrop tacked back into position over the 'flexible MDF'


Here's the view as you turn into the train room.

(Backdrop isn't quite plumb, I still have some adjustments to do on the MDF.)

Tomorrow my air-dry clay should arrive, that I'll use to position the rock castings into position. In the meantime, I think I'll putz around with the dam and mill pond.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7741 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 08/03/2019 :  4:17:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking Good, Dave!

If you want some "instant results" today, break out the acrylic tube paint (I use the low-end Liquitex) and have at the landforms. Mix black and white with some tan for rocks, black and yellow for various greens.

Avoid mixing too much... it's too much like Work and it makes things monochromatic.

It's surprising to see how much "change" you can accomplish in a very few minutes using the acrylic artist paints. And when the time comes to change things, change away.. the stuff is just paint....

Pete
in Michigan



Edited by - Orionvp17 on 08/03/2019 5:21:06 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 6694 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/03/2019 :  5:03:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Pete, that's a good idea. I have some sample paint in various "dirt-like colors" that I got when I was trying to match NE Brownstone's scenery dirt. I'll dig one of those out and put it on. I primed the piece of wood that represents the dam and mill pond. I -think- I'll paint the pond part as close to the backdrop's stream color as I can get, and then apply gloss medium. There are lots of techniques for doing waterfalls (water over the dam). I dug out my scenery books and started reading about how the experts have done it.

By the way, trimming that 'bendable MDF' is not easy. You have to set up something like a zero-clearance plate to keep the ribs on the back from splintering badly. The good thing is that they sand/file/scrape down pretty easily (after my -very rough- cut with the buzzsaw.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 08/03/2019 5:04:33 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7741 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 08/03/2019 :  5:27:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I used 0.060 or maybe 0.080 styrene sheet for curved backdrops, screwed it into drywall, taped, spackled, sanded and painted. That's likely to be tough for you with that door right there, but I didn't have those issues....

And for the record, I'm a big fan of the second-hand, paint store wrong-color-because-it-doesn't-match-the-curtains dirt-colored paints, as they go on well, behave, look like dirt and will eventually get covered over with scenery anyway.... Not having it look like Winter indoors is a Good Thing for me. I need Winter, I can usually look out the window!

Keep plugging, and please let us know how things work out!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 6694 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/03/2019 :  9:11:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Back to the rocks! Try ACE Hardware. Even in our podunk town, ACE can scan a hardcopy photo, and mix the color to an exact match in any of their paint platforms. They'll even do a half pint or pint sampler for you, for a couple of bucks.

Jim



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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/07/2019 :  11:20:59 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's the air-dry clay in between the rock castings and foundation pieces. Today I'll color it to match the rock.

The clay does shrink a bit, so yesterday I had to go back and fill some cracks and let it dry overnight.

The clay -only- sticks to your fingers, so it was a bit of a pain to get it into position. I used dental tools and similar clay tools to push the clay into the gaps and shape it.

And after a first coat of paint:


dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 08/07/2019 11:43:35 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7741 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 08/07/2019 :  1:47:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good Dave

It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 5223 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 08/07/2019 :  2:44:04 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Looks like a rough and rocky stream.

Mike



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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 08/07/2019 :  3:26:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike, I'm trying to think a bit 'geomorphologically'. Behind the dam would be some sort of outcropping, a fall line towards the coast. The stream bed itself would have been carved by glacial runoff through the outcropping, so that's my justification for a relatively narrow and rough bed. Does that make sense?

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7741 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 08/07/2019 :  9:44:08 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Makes sense to me, Dave.


Country: USA | Posts: 5258 Go to Top of Page
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