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Author Previous Topic: Rebuilding my T&P layout HO scale Topic Next Topic: Cork Roadbed Thickness
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deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/02/2019 :  6:23:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, my first idea was "glue the pieces together with strong wood glue, then add a thin styrene strip as a 'keeper' across the bottom."

Turns out that's not strong enough. The glue held, but the plaster behind it gave way. Worse, the whole assembly wasn't stiff enough and some of the arches separated

So I got 1/16 x 1" steel and used epoxy to glue everything that separated back together.


Then I discovered the piers are about 3/32" too tall to fit, so I filed and sanded them down. I got a bit too enthusiastic with this, and chipped some of the pier bottoms. The large parts I glued back together. Anyway, more epoxy and they're in place.


Tomorrow, I'll attach the small pilaster pieces between the arches, and touch up/fill cracks, gaps and chips. Then I can prime (i normally prime plaster, because I usually have glued something together and of course any attempt at staining the raw plaster will have nasty white parts where the stain didn't penetrate the glue. So priming gives me a much more consistent starting point.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 02/02/2019 6:32:34 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7319 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 02/02/2019 :  8:07:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It coming along fine Dave and looking good too.

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4860 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/02/2019 :  8:36:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
One more photo, bridge back in position.


dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7319 Go to Top of Page

Orionvp17
Fireman

Premium Member

Posted - 02/02/2019 :  8:42:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Looking good, Dave!

Pete
in Michigan



Country: USA | Posts: 6275 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 02/02/2019 :  8:49:16 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Beautiful viaduct, Dave. It has an early look to it, most appropriate. I expect it will be a focal point on your layout.

Mike



Country: USA | Posts: 4491 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2019 :  1:20:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The "mortar has been repointed", with the gaps filled between the castings. You can see the tools I used for that. Extra credit if you know what that nylon "toothbrush" was used for originally.


Now to let this dry thoroughly, then do a good inspection prior to priming. I bought some Chooch tunnel portals at Springfield, I'll paint those at the same time (right now they're soaking in 'Barney juice', 10% solution of "Super Clean." to remove any mold release compound.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7319 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2019 :  3:18:18 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Primed with light grey ("Bob Ross" brand) gesso. This will also be the mortar color, so it's important that the primer get into all the cracks. But you also don't want to fill in any of the relief, so I thin the gesso a bit and then go back over it several times to make sure it's a thin but covering coat.


Once this is dry, I'll start sponge painting the stone color, being careful to keep stone color out of the mortar cracks.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 02/03/2019 6:44:38 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7319 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2019 :  4:33:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice job Dave.

Jerry

"And in the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 10992 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 02/03/2019 :  5:18:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave, the paint really makes the stones “pop”.


Country: USA | Posts: 4491 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2019 :  6:44:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I suspect if I mixed burnt umber in with the grey, I'd get a good "New England Brownstone" basalt look. But that's not the color I'm going for :-)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7319 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2019 :  8:28:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My approach for painting masonry is to drybrush various colors using makeup wedge sponges. Here I show each layer and the paint I used.


I alternate lighter and darker coats


Drybrushing with sponges gives good coverage but keeps the paint out of the mortar joints.


And the bridge in position after the first couple of paint colors.


This clearly lacks definition, but I've run out of make-up sponges :-) (Each layer chews up a sponge, because there's so much stone to cover.) So it needs at least one more lighter base color, and then a top-down very light color for highlights. After that, i start with chalks/Pan Pastels. But enough for tonight...

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 02/03/2019 8:29:09 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7319 Go to Top of Page

Empire of the Air
Engine Wiper



Posted - 02/03/2019 :  8:30:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by deemery

Extra credit if you know what that nylon "toothbrush" was used for originally.

dave




Sure looks to me like the brush from a military weapons cleaning kit.

Regards,
Wallace



Country: USA | Posts: 105 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/03/2019 :  8:47:09 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Empire of the Air

quote:
Originally posted by deemery

Extra credit if you know what that nylon "toothbrush" was used for originally.

dave




Sure looks to me like the brush from a military weapons cleaning kit.

Regards,
Wallace



We have a winner! The infamous M-16 toothbrush. (I found this at a train show tool vendor, mine were all worn out. She didn't know exactly what they were until I told her.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7319 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 02/04/2019 :  4:10:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
(The forum ate my first post )

I finished up the coloring. I thought the overall tone was too grey, so I added a relatively heavy coat of a medium tan.

Then I added some white to the light grey, as well as some more water, to get a transparent coat that toned down the tan.

The last coat of paint was an off-white, drybrushed with a bristle fan brush (hard to find but worth it), in a downward-only motion.


Next I moved to pastels/chalks. I turn pastel sticks into chalk by rubbing them over a small piece of wallboard sanding screen. I applied them with the brush, putting some chalk on a stone and smoothing it out. The chalks give me more control in coloring individual stones. I also tried a new technique, I rubbed the pastel stick on a stone, and then used a "Colour Shaper" to smooth out and distribute color. These are basically paintbrushes with rubber tips, instead of bristles/hairs. See https://www.rexart.com/colour_shapers.html


And here's the bridge in location, to check how it looks with the current layout lighting.


That's the coloring, at least for now.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7319 Go to Top of Page

Grubes
Crew Chief



Posted - 02/10/2019 :  11:15:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Interesting how the lighting really changes how it looks. I think seeing it on the layout is the only true judge. From your picture, looks great.

Dave



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Page: of 22 Previous Topic: Rebuilding my T&P layout HO scale Topic Next Topic: Cork Roadbed Thickness  
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