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Author Topic Next Topic: Avalon Tippi Foam Cutter
Page: of 26

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 09/30/2018 :  5:53:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mostly I did some 'bedrock' on top of the bench work, but the green styrofoam is "first thoughts" for the topography along the back wall.

That's the HOn30 line going uphill from right to left, and there'll be a slate quarry in that left corner. A quarry is one of the few scenery concepts that actually is shaped like a corner :-) :-)

On the right, the idea is to work the slope of the hills so it looks like the track curves away from the viewer, instead of going straight through the view block. I'm not quite sure whether I want to do a full height view block, the height shown here, or something a little less tall that follows the topography.

And I still have lots of work to do on the other side of the view block.

But first I need to get another sheet of 2" styrofoam. The basic approach is to lay that as the bedrock about 1/2" below the height of the track and level), to give me something to build scenery onto, as well as having space for foundations under structures.

Today's Shorpy has a nice photo of a pair of storefronts along a sloping street:
http://www.shorpy.com/node/23875

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 09/30/2018 6:00:15 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7431 Go to Top of Page

ocalicreek
Crew Chief

Posted - 10/01/2018 :  12:46:28 PM  Show Profile  Visit ocalicreek's Homepage  Reply with Quote
That's a great Shorpy image. Makes me think of Ray Dunakin's work.

Your first shot in the above post somehow calls to mind the video MRH put out of Earl Smallshaw talking about the forced perspective town scene on the Middletown & Mystic Mines. I know a quarry scene is different altogether, but the scene as you have it now somehow makes me think of that video.

Galen


My Train Blog: http://ocalicreek.blogspot.com/

Country: USA | Posts: 628 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 10/01/2018 :  7:51:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A mock-up of the hill in front of the HOn30 tracks and slate quarry.

I think the profile of the backdrop hill is about a foot too high. it should probably stick up maybe 6"-8" above the narrow gauge track.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7431 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/10/2018 :  8:03:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I found some motivation and did a bit of scenery work. I put a piece of rosin paper over some of my styrofoam, and then painted that with full strength white glue. Here's the paper and the styrofoam. I want to retain the flat/level styrofoam pieces so I can cut through the hardshell to get to a sub-grade level surface. Then I can mount building foundations or platforms to make sure they're actually level/plumb.

Once this has hardened, I'll cover with a layer or two of traditional plaster wrap.

The one thing I've noticed is the rosin paper gets some small waves, that actually look pretty realistic (instead of being perfectly flat.) More tomorrow once the first sheet has dried.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7431 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/11/2018 :  3:31:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
More rosin paper laid down and glued.



The paper here is at the 'basement level' of the styrofoam. I think what I'll do for the city area that will be in the large flat space is to put everything on 1/4" foamcore with foundations of at least 1/4", and then go back and bring the terrain up to the actual street level with plaster cloth.

But first, I need to lay down plaster cloth on the upper slopes, and then plan out the streets.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 11/11/2018 3:58:02 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7431 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 11/11/2018 :  3:37:13 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Itís looking a lot like Arizona, Dave.


Country: USA | Posts: 4674 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 11/11/2018 :  4:00:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Michael Hohn

Itís looking a lot like Arizona, Dave.



Or Georgia red clay country!

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7431 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/18/2019 :  3:37:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, I kinda burned out on the layout side for couple months. I built some kits (see http://www.modelersforum.com/index.php?topic=4019.0 ), but now I'm getting back to the layout itself. I did some tests/experiment/practice on soldering rail with low temp solder. That didn't work out quite as well as I expected, but I got good enough results on the test that I decided to wire up some parts of the layout. That's when I discovered one section of track (the passing siding in front of the big town area) had badly kinked. I'm not quite sure how that happened (if it's thermal expansion, why isn't the rest of the layout showing this?), but I started making that repair. This weekend should be good for projects, if we don't lose power in the snow and wind.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7431 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/21/2019 :  3:43:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I ran the track bus wires today, including the terminal strips for the potentially removable section in front of the electrical closet. Russ Greene/New England Brownstone has the pieces for the viaduct that will go in that section, so that will probably be one of the first to move towards full scenery. But now I need to connect the feeders to the bus wires, and think about connectivity testing, etc.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7431 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/28/2019 :  8:31:13 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Russ Greene told me in advance about the new kit/parts he released at Springfield, for a stone bridge/viaduct. I designed the potentially removable section in front of the electrical closet expecting to put that bridge there. 12" straight section, 6" from track down to the bottom of the benchwork.


I did a test fit and then removed the splines and roadbed underneath the track. Minimum shimming needed to get the bridge level underneath the track.




The track curves at the right side, so I have to cut a small angle between the last arch and the abutment.






Next step is to figure out how to glue everything together to keep things aligned and ensure that there are no accidents. (You don't want 'accidents' with plaster kits :-( )

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 01/28/2019 8:35:45 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7431 Go to Top of Page

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 01/29/2019 :  12:11:33 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice looking. Russ does some beautiful work.

Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 11154 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 01/29/2019 :  12:19:19 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What a fabulous bridge. That's one advantage of modeling a East coast line.
how are going to cool the stone?

Bob


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4949 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/29/2019 :  08:43:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'll prime the mortar color (probably light grey), and then sponge-paint the stone colors (probably beiges, but I need to think about what kind of stone this is :-) ). I'll add highlights with Pan Pastels and chalks. I've done a lot of masonry that way (and even gave some clinics on coloring stone and brick.)

Stonework done this way on my Model Masterpieces CM roundhouse. That's put away, for when I tackle the big yard and engine terminal.

(The little structure in the front is actually a styrene kit, to show you can get the same coloring on plastic as well as plaster.)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 01/29/2019 08:55:06 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 7431 Go to Top of Page

railman28
Fireman



Posted - 01/29/2019 :  11:16:48 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice job getting the plastic to match. Don Ball recently built one of these kits. He too used a similar color. His has a bit more yellow. I personally prefer a darker color. Maybe it's the lighting in the photograph. But look at this Video;

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJ-tnYpq7Ow

For sure consistence is important on your railroad. I doubt a railroad would use different quarries unless they really had too.


It's only make-believe

Country: USA | Posts: 4949 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 01/29/2019 :  2:58:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The stone and architecture of the Como Roundhouse and the Colorado City roundhouse are very similar, although I think there was more than 20 years between their construction. See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m8DofjeW6Qs for some views of the CM roundhouse. (Before a brewery, it was a famous pottery maker and shop.)

The name "NE Brownstone" itself relates to the stone commonly used in New England (B&M, Boston & Albany, etc), which I'm pretty sure is a dark grey basalt rock that's relatively uniform in color. The point about consistent stone coloring is a good one. I'll need to think a bit more about that. Since I'm now taking geology courses, that puts some pressure on me to get the rock right! :-) :-)

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7431 Go to Top of Page
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