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Author Previous Topic: Rebuilding my T&P layout HO scale Topic Next Topic: Cork Roadbed Thickness
Page: of 22

TRAINS1941
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/15/2018 :  4:47:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave good to see you taking everything into consideration!

Breaker box I mean if it was done right how often would need to open the door??
It would be of a pain in the arse crawling under to open the door for the electrician!!


Jerry

"And in the end, itís not the years in your life that count. It's the life in your years." A. Lincoln

Country: USA | Posts: 10994 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/15/2018 :  5:32:44 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'd be paying the electrician to work in the panel, so he'll earn his money :-) :-)

Here's a photo Russ Greene posted of his latest project. A drawing of same is in my previous photos.

I'll build some sort of mill building to the left of the bridge to disguise the wall/electrical closet corner.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7321 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 04/15/2018 :  6:25:39 PM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

It it were me, I would first move that turnout and spur to the other side of the panel closet. I would construct a 2 to 3 foot section that can be bolted to the permanent benchwork on either side and could be removed if necessary. You could scenic over the breaks in such a way that you could break things apart easily The important thing is that the framework, roadbed and track are not continuous between sections.

My philosophy is that when I am paying for work I want them to work as efficiently as possible.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4493 Go to Top of Page

nortonw
New Hire

Posted - 04/15/2018 :  7:17:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I too have a suggestion about the corner with the electrical box.

Using a section of your drawing I submit this idea: I crudely drew some lines on your drawing to indicate where I think you should make the section breaks to make the corner removable. No need to move anything, just give that section the ability to be removed in case any work ever needs to be done. It's not that hard and it alleviates the issue.

See what you think...



Norton

The V & T may live again, in my garage.

Country: USA | Posts: 35 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/15/2018 :  8:30:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hmmm. Maybe I should put the bridge on the door side of the closet. I was planning to put plywood underneath that whole structure (as the river sub-bed), which is pretty much what both Mike and Norton are suggesting.

There'll be a little bit of rework to do that.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7321 Go to Top of Page

AaronV
Section Hand

Posted - 04/16/2018 :  10:42:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Looks very interesting. Just wanted to chime in to say it looks like you're striking a good balance of careful planning and anticipating key design and construction issues, while still making progress with design and prepping the room.

Too bad about the stud finder. I have a mid-level one, I think it's from either Zircon or Bosch. Not the cheapest model but not high-end either. Works about 90-95% of the time and I couldn't imagine doing interior carpentry or electrical work or just mounting stuff on walls without it.

Aaron V.



Country: | Posts: 66 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/16/2018 :  12:55:14 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

If I make the section in front of the electrical closet door removable, the first question is "where does it go?" Everything else depends on that decision.

My thought is "It'll slide out to the right." That means trimming back the board that is currently sticking out on the right side. On the left side, you can see the screws holding the 1x4 into the walls. These mark the stud locations. The first screw to the left of the switch is about 15" from the door. So that makes the removable section 15" in that direction, and about 48" in the other direction with the edge lining up about 4" to the right of the wall. The shape is roughly triangular (48" x 15"), with the hypotenuse as the curve of the layout (as shown by the tape on the floor.)

The second thought is "how do I hold it up?" The current 1x4 across the door will be the back edge of the removable section. I can do a 2x4x6" piece just underneath where the current 1x4 is on the right side of the door. I can do another 2x4x15" on the left side, underneath the switch outlet. I'll screw the framing of the removable section into 1x4 that will be in the benchwork grid. But I think I'll need to do some sort of brace (post or diagonal) where the permanent benchwork sticks out from the left-hand wall.

The base itself will be 1/2" plywood. I'll screw the risers at the edges, so the track/splines will be supported both in the removable section and the permanent section. Once the splines are in place, I can cut those at the edge of the removable section. I'll leave the homabed and track itself intact, since removing this section will be "only if needed".

Thoughts?

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7321 Go to Top of Page

jbvb
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/16/2018 :  10:09:59 PM  Show Profile  Visit jbvb's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I would make it a lift-out, supported at its three corners (either side of the door and however far you need to go to the right (towards the main yard) to give access. Seems like a smaller amount of critical carpentry that way, but YMMV.


Country: USA | Posts: 5711 Go to Top of Page

Carrie Creek
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/17/2018 :  12:00:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I would suggest that the space between the outside corner of the left bench work and the hinge side of the door opening be at least 36Ē. You could have a big guy with a toolbelt come to fix he would like all the space possible. Besides the sharp corner at the end poking out.


Phil Z
POR (press on regardless)

Country: USA | Posts: 1500 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/17/2018 :  5:45:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, there's nothing like 1-1 set-up.

Originally, I was going to make the slide-out section about 15" wide. But when I looked at the resulting access (and how far the permanent benchwork would stick out), I decided to make this the full 24" wide. That will reduce the amount of support on the left side permanent benchwork, but I can compensate for that with some other measures to hold the plywood base in position.

Here's a peek from underneath, I might add some more bracing.


And from the top.

The board on the left represents the edge of the permanent benchwork. The slide-out section will have a matching piece (both sides). The black magic marker represents the edge of the benchwork through this section. Track level will be about 2" above the top of the benchwork. This scene will have that NE Brownstone bridge, so the plywood represents the base of the water feature.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Edited by - deemery on 04/17/2018 6:45:43 PM

Country: USA | Posts: 7321 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/19/2018 :  8:36:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yesterday the weather was warm enough I could run the table saw and finish shaping some wood. Today I got a lot accomplished, got most of the benchwork against the wall in the main room installed.

and

I still have to do the central blob, the framing for the small yard in the other room, and design and construct the swinging gate that will make the complete oval.

You can see the steel brackets that I'm using to reinforce the wall-mounted sections. The only problem with those (besides the expense) is they're not all square. I'll have to do some significant shimming when I get around to screwing the side that is parallel to the floor into the benchwork joists. That's very annoying.

I'll probably do the blob central framing tomorrow, that'll be a bit of a challenge by myself, but I think I know how to do it.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7321 Go to Top of Page

Michael Hohn
Fireman



Posted - 04/20/2018 :  07:23:53 AM  Show Profile  Visit Michael Hohn's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave,

Youíve accomplished a lot in a few days. Work looks very neatly done as well.

Mike


_______________________________________________________________________________________________
Nobody living can ever stop me, as I go walking that freedom highway -- Woody Guthrie

Country: USA | Posts: 4493 Go to Top of Page

BurleyJim
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/20/2018 :  10:55:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by deemery


You can see the steel brackets that I'm using to reinforce the wall-mounted sections. The only problem with those (besides the expense) is they're not all square. I'll have to do some significant shimming when I get around to screwing the side that is parallel to the floor into the benchwork joists. That's very annoying.


dave




How about putting them in a vise, and using a square and a hammer to 'adjust' them beforehand, instead of fighting with shims?

It's looking good!

Jim



Edited by - BurleyJim on 04/20/2018 10:57:35 AM

Country: USA | Posts: 3817 Go to Top of Page

MarkF
Engineer

Premium Member


Posted - 04/20/2018 :  12:08:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Your making great progress Dave. I used shelf brackets for my upper level around the walls. While they are very strong, they weren't square either!

Mark

Country: USA | Posts: 13726 Go to Top of Page

deemery
Fireman

Premium Member


Posted - 04/20/2018 :  4:38:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The spine for the blob is in place:

You can see the bracing on the lally column. This adds a lot of stability to the structure, unless there's an earthquake, I don't expect the column will move much :-)

And when you're working solo, clamps are your friends!


I need to add an intermediate set of legs (and sway bracing), and then do the cross-members for the blob itself. Once those are in place, this should be good and stable.

I'll need more wood, and I need to figure out how I'll do the small yard.

dave


Modeling 1890s (because the voices in my head told me to)

Country: USA | Posts: 7321 Go to Top of Page
Page: of 22 Previous Topic: Rebuilding my T&P layout HO scale Topic Next Topic: Cork Roadbed Thickness  
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