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Author Previous Topic: The Gallery: April 17 Modeling Plant Life Topic Next Topic: Having fun with the camera
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bpate
Fireman



Posted - 01/09/2004 :  7:46:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Great signs Mike, I shall have to do something like those on my pub when I built it.


Allen, the weather should be good at this time of year. It was about 25C when I took that shot. The roos are herd animals. They swept in, sat there for a few minutes and then all took off again.

William, I here is another photo showing the roos and some tree texture. The gum trees shed the bark in strips.




Country: Australia | Posts: 3090 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 01/15/2004 :  08:48:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The first to venture out in today's snow.

Bruce




Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3

Country: USA | Posts: 29559 Go to Top of Page

Marken
Fireman



Posted - 01/15/2004 :  7:42:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My neighbor Bruce and I spent a couple of hours on Saturday looking for toothy critters at one of our favorite ice fishing lakes. It was our first trip of the year.

The lake is mostly known for numbers and not size, but we have heard reports of some 20+ pound northerns being taken. But, you know how us fisherman are. A 2 pound fish grows about a pound every time a story is told.

Anyways, after Bruce iced 4 smaller northerns while I sat and watched, my tip up finally tripped. You always sort of know what size fish you have by how fast the lines goes out. The smaller ones almost always run like nuts, stop, turn the minnow in it's mouth and then slowly move off. The bigger ones slowly take line out and don't move as far.

Well, take a look and you'll see how fast my line went out.



She measured 44 1/2" and we estimated her to be around 24-26 pounds. Naturally, she was released as the pic shows.


In memory of Mike Chambers

Country: USA | Posts: 2944 Go to Top of Page

Johnnie C. Scott
Engine Wiper



Posted - 01/16/2004 :  11:57:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by bpate

Great signs Mike, I shall have to do something like those on my pub when I built it.


Allen, the weather should be good at this time of year. It was about 25C when I took that shot. The roos are herd animals. They swept in, sat there for a few minutes and then all took off again.

William, I here is another photo showing the roos and some tree texture. The gum trees shed the bark in strips.



Nice tree! We called 'em eucalyptus trees in California where I grew up.


Johnnie C. Scott- Old Curmudgeon

Country: USA | Posts: 379 Go to Top of Page

bpate
Fireman



Posted - 01/16/2004 :  5:33:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hi Johnnie, we call them eucalyptus as well here. Gum tree is just short hand for them. I understand they were introduced to California about the time of the gold rush. I was quite surprised to see them when I first went to LA back in the 80's.


Country: Australia | Posts: 3090 Go to Top of Page

bpate
Fireman



Posted - 02/06/2004 :  03:48:20 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is a pic of a koala seen just near our camp site on the Murrey river last week. Karen's daughter wanted to see a koala and I think we saw about five, the most we have seen in the wild for many years.




Country: Australia | Posts: 3090 Go to Top of Page

Dutchman
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/06/2004 :  05:56:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Barry,
He sure is a cute little tyke!


Bruce

Modeling the railroads of the Jersey Highlands in HO and the logging railroads of Pennsylvania in HOn3

Country: USA | Posts: 29559 Go to Top of Page

railcodger
Engine Wiper

Posted - 02/06/2004 :  3:12:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Keep the photos coming, Barry. Most interesting!

William



Country: USA | Posts: 181 Go to Top of Page

Marken
Fireman



Posted - 02/15/2004 :  9:26:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
This is a picture of the largest sturgeon speared on Lake Winnebago this year, breaking the 51 year old record of 180lbs by 8lbs. The fish was 87" long.




In memory of Mike Chambers

Country: USA | Posts: 2944 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/16/2004 :  6:35:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A flock of geese - about 2 dozen or so - have been wintering over in my little cove at the lake and crapping all over my front yard . I had hoped to get a photo or two of them this past weekend, but they took off everytime I started down the walkway to the shoreline. So this is the best I could get of them.



Also, there was a bald eagle out on one of the ice floes in the middle of the lake most of yesterday. I could see him perfectly with the binoculars. He was eating a large dead fish. Unfortunately, he was too far away for my camera to pick up in a photo. It's unusual for us to see eagles up at our end of the lake. Normally, they stay down in the Chalk Cliffs area of the lake, which is several miles south of us.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

anbhurst
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/16/2004 :  7:17:33 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Nice picture of the geese Mike. Are they Canada geese or another variety? They do not resemble the Canada geese we have out here in Oregon. Maybe it's just the way the light is striking them. In the past, we have had to catch and re-locate some of our over-populated geese because of the impact and mess they leave. You could probably build a tram with moving people silhouettes. That would keep them out of range of your camera and out of your front yard. We have lots of Bald Eagles out here.

Allen
Modelling the East in the West!


quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

A flock of geese. . .


Allen
Modeling the East in the West on the Northeastern Pacific RIM, Oregon, that is!

Country: USA | Posts: 7259 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/16/2004 :  8:35:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Allen, I don't think they're Canadian. I think they're Crapsalot geese. .

Actually, I don't know what variety they are. Maybe one of our hunters here will recognize them.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page

wrongsideofthetracks
Crew Chief



Posted - 02/17/2004 :  02:12:45 AM  Show Profile  Visit wrongsideofthetracks's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Canadian Geese????? Common Mike, the Canadian influence is everywhere! Geese, Jim Carey, beer, what will we think of next. It is part of our big take over of the US. We use the geese to infiltrate, those droppings ???? well I rather not say, but they they make for a wonderful lawn fertilizer, or grind up and you have wonderful Canadian natural ground cover for your layout. Hey wait a minute.....how about a new, all natural ground cover product.....WS should be all over this - 28 ounce shaker, I can see it now .

No Canadian Geese were hurt in the typing of this response.

Karl F.



Country: Canada | Posts: 902 Go to Top of Page

anbhurst
Moderator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/17/2004 :  02:36:56 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike,

After taking another look at your picture, I believe they are Canada Geese. The angle at which the picture was taken is deceiving with the exception of several birds, . .They are actually flying away from the camera. By the way, I was corrected some time ago that there is not such thing as a Canadian Goose or Geese. They are correctly identified as Canada Geese, but you can use your term of endearment.

Allen
Modelling the East in the West!

quote:
Originally posted by MikeC

Allen, I don't think they're Canadian. I think they're Crapsalot geese. .

Actually, I don't know what variety they are. Maybe one of our hunters here will recognize them.





Allen
Modeling the East in the West on the Northeastern Pacific RIM, Oregon, that is!

Country: USA | Posts: 7259 Go to Top of Page

MikeC
Administrator

Premium Member


Posted - 02/17/2004 :  10:47:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, their droppings may make good lawn fertilizer, but my dog won't roll in Scott's Turfbuilder. So I think I'll stick with Scott's, thank you, and rake the "natural" product over the seawall and into the water.




Country: USA | Posts: 21584 Go to Top of Page
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